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2019 Covention

MSHA Convention Program

Thursday Sessions
Friday Sessions
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Thursday

7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Session 1 - Round Robin

This informal session will allow presenters and attendees to converse and interact on topics related to research or clinical practice in speech-language pathology or audiology. Presenters will speak for 10-15 minutes on a research or clinical topic within their scope of expertise and allow 5-10 minutes of discussion and questions among the attendees.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the history of Missouri licensure and certification requirements related to the schools
  • Identify at least three issues impacting service delivery
  • List pending legislation impacting our professions at both a state and national level

Level of Learning: Introductory

8:15 pm - 9:15 pm

Session 2 - Ask MSHA

This session will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of MSHA Executive Board members and ASHA Advisory Council to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate level training programs, state licensure requirements and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s (DESE) implementer model. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Participants will be given an opportunity to ask questions and to contribute to the discussion.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Restate two main points from the presenter’s ideas or research
  • Cite two resources for further research on the topics presented
  • Articulate one way they could apply this new research or clinical practice in their work setting

Level of Learning: Introductory

Friday

8:00 am - 4:15 pm

Day Institute - Cognitive Rehabilitation: Practical Interventions and Personalized Planning

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Consultant

In this innovated day institute, you will receive instructions in 101 evidence-based techniques, strategies and interventions for all levels of cognitive impairment. Whether a patient presents with a mild head injury or severe cognitive impairment, this seminar teaches which approach to take and which avenue of interventions to pursue. The institute addresses the 8 Core Foundations of all Cognitive Domains, assessment procedures for each and discusses individualized therapy techniques. The Stages of the Patient Awareness and Acceptance of their Deficit is discussed in length followed with interventions techniques for each Stage. You will be presented with techniques that will change the brains neuroplasticity, as well as offer compensatory strategies and enhance a person’s procedure memory. This institute emphasizes the importance and effectiveness of creating highly individualized treatment strategies and provides attendees with the needed skills to choose and adapt techniques into tailored, personalized therapy plans. Active case studies will be examined and participants will learn to design a patient profile with therapy interventions and document goals according to Medicare Regulations.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain 101 Cognitive therapy techniques addressing all levels of cognitive impairments
  • Describe knowledge on changing the brains neuroplasticity by discussing State-of-the-Art techniques
  • Identify patients levels of awareness and acceptance, their self-efficacy and how to facilitate the patients ownership of their therapy goals and program
  • Document patient-centered goals, measure progress and justify medical necessity

Level of Learning: Advanced

Day Institute - Master Self-Regulation to Transform Aggression Into Communication, Tantrums Into Self Control and Defiance Into Cooperation

Jill A. Molli, MEd, Loving Guidance, Inc.

Self-regulation is the ability to manage our thoughts, feelings and actions in service of a goal. It is also about effectively using emotions as signals that alert us to the actions needed to sustain a relationship. We are social beings with social brains. Our relationships with others are what sustains us or destroys us. Aggression, tantrums and defiance are psychological signals that direct us to change our behavior, much like physiological signals of thirst, hunger and tiredness direct us to drink, eat and sleep. Ignoring children's internal states (a common practice) risks malnourishing their social-emotional development, much like ignoring hunger risks malnourishing their physical growth. Discipline is not something you do to children. It is something you develop within them. Our internal guidance system consists of our emotions and feelings. Most adults struggle to access this basic system and, as a consequence, find it difficult to help children learn to listen to theirs. The adult often overlays the child's existing internal guidance with a secondary system that seeks approval or attempts to control others, rather than depending on the innate wisdom of internally motivated self-regulation. This day institute seeks to help adults unravel and discover their own self-regulation issues. It then provides concrete skills and lessons for adults to help children develop theirs. Our relationship with our emotions shapes our brains, perceptions, potential for success and the health of all our relationships. In this institute, you will learn the five steps to self-regulation in order to transform upset into life skills.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify how the brain learns to self-regulate
  • Identify how to literally wire children for self-control
  • Identify the five essential steps in teaching positive behavior
  • Describe how to create and implement a safe place in a classroom

Level of Learning: Introductory

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Session 3 - Using Natural Language Development to Guide AAC Intervention

Gretchen Bright, BS, Prentke Romich Company

Many SLPs exit graduate school with a strong understanding of Brown’s Stages of Language Development. Those insightful stages provide a clear direction when working with children with language delays. When AAC is introduced to our non-verbal clients, we should not deviate from the guidance of Brown’s Stages. Furthermore, the neurology of how words are learned also needs to be taken into consideration and applied when using AAC. In this session, we will examine both critical aspects of language development, as well as the tools, resources and therapy approaches that are available to effectively teach language to those who are non-verbal.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the stages of language development
  • Utilize AAC therapy approaches to teach language in a stage-based way
  • List at least three natural language teaching techniques used with verbal children that can be carried over to AAC

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 4 - Development of Inner Ear Gene Therapy as a Treatment for Hearing Loss and Dizziness

Wade Chien, MD, FACS, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Hearing loss and dizziness are common disorders affecting the world’s population today. Unfortunately, the current treatment options for these patients are limited. Gene therapy is a promising treatment modality that has the potential of reversing the disease process in the inner ear. In this session, we will discuss the progress that has been made in developing gene therapy as a treatment for hearing loss and dizziness and the challenges that lie ahead in translating gene therapy from the bench to bedside.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Become familiar with the concept of inner ear gene therapy
  • Become familiar with the applications of inner ear gene therapy to treat hearing loss and dizziness
  • Understand the challenges of inner ear gene therapy

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 5 - For Adults Only: Applications for Assessment and Therapy

Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

Clinician and patient use of personal technology in the form of smartphones and tablets is expanding. This session explores the use of smartphone and tablet accessibility features and applications to increase our patients' communication, independence and safety, and to promote extra-clinical practice and skill generalization. Evolution of applications, free versus paid applications, application benefits and pitfalls, EBP and explore applications for swallowing, speech-language, AAC, cognition and voice will be discussed. SLPs knowledge of how applications work, who they can benefit and ways to incorporate them into therapy will be presented. In addition to SLP-specific applications, information on general applications to promote safety and independence will be provided, along with discussion about device accessibility features for low-vision, hearing and touch to increase patient acceptance.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three smartphone/tablet accessibility features that can be used to maximize a patient's cognitive-communication skills
  • Discuss five application and describe their use in-session and extra-clinically to target goals
  • Differentiate between strong and weak applications and explain three characteristics of strong applications
  • Explain two benefits of application use for therapy and skill generalization

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 6 - School Services Update

Elizabeth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District; Pat Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty Public Schools; Diane Golden, PhD, Past Policy Coordinator for Missouri Council of Administrators of Special Education; Karen Allan; Naomi Brunner, MS, CCC-SLP, Blue Springs R-IV School District

The purpose of this session is to inform the MSHA membership with respect to proposed and/or new standards and the impact on speech-language pathologists working in the school setting. The new eligibility criteria for language impairment and sound system disorder will be reviewed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the current language impairment and sound system disorder criterion
  • Describe the changes with the new language impairment and sound system disorder criterion
  • List changes with eligibility criterion regarding voice and fluency disorder

Level of Learning: Introductory

1:00 pm - 4:15 pm

3:15 pm - 4:15 pm

Session 8 - AAC and Aphasia: Bridging Communication and Life Participation

Amanda Hettenhausen, MAR, CCC-SLP, Saltillo Corporation

Communication intervention for a person with aphasia is challenging. It’s emotional and carries unique experiences for each person, requiring a customized approach to therapeutic goals. With the increased availability of both low-end and high-end technology to support communication, individuals with aphasia and their conversation partners (i.e., family, friends, health professionals, etc.) are interested in how augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) may benefit someone with aphasia. This session will review current best practices for AAC and aphasia, with a focus on the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia (LPAA). This approach places an emphasis on empowering the person with aphasia and their communication partners to re-engage in life post-stroke. Examples of AAC supports, features and intervention strategies will be shared. Case examples and therapy outcomes will be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia
  • Identify three examples of AAC supports that may benefit a person with aphasia
  • List two intervention strategies that may benefit a person with aphasia

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 9 - Stepping Stones to Blast Off

Jamie Klupe, MS, CCC-SLP, Special School District of St. Louis County

Working with students who have severe physical limitations and complex communication needs can be daunting for service providers. Many factors must be considered when making decisions regarding a student’s communication system including point(s) of access, cognitive ability and student motivation for communication. If these factors are not appropriately addressed, it could lead to feelings of frustration and failure on the part of the communicator as well as service provider. This presentation will highlight a single student with Cerebral Palsy who has had a successful transition from using switches to activate cause-effect toys to her use of two step scanning using the CoreScanner vocabulary file from Prentke Romich. CoreScanner is a vocabulary file that uses the Unity language system and is based on the Language Acquisition Through Motor Planning (LAMP) approach. This system provides the user the opportunity to learn how to scan and select using their speech generating device. Communicators begin by learning to scan to a single message and progress through seven levels, gradually increasing their access to more vocabulary. Participants will review CoreScanner, learn how an interdisciplinary team approach led to the determination of this vocabulary file choice, review videos and data regarding student progression through levels, implementation strategies used by the team and use of CoreScanner in the academic setting.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate the seven levels of the CoreScanner vocabulary files
  • Explain how CoreScanner uses motor planning with switches to facilitate language acquisition
  • Analyze implementation and generalization strategies
  • Describe the importance of a multi-disciplinary team approach in determining communication modes for students with complex needs

Level of Learning: Introductory

3:15 pm - 5:15 pm

Session 11 - Vestibular Dysfunction and Assessments in Patients With EVA and Superior Canal Dehiscence

PWade Chien, MD, FACS, Johns Hopkins School of Mediciney

In this session, we will discuss the clinical presentation of enlarged vestibular aqueduct and superior canal dehiscence. We will also discuss the assessment and treatment options for these patients.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the clinical presentation of patients with EVA and SCD
  • Discuss the clinical assessment of patients with EVA and SCD
  • Discuss the treatment options for patients with EVA and SCD

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 11 - What SLPs Need to Know About RTI and MTSS

Mindy Bridges, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas Medical Center

In the past two decades, educators and researchers have been interested in the use of educational frameworks that allow children to be identified as having reading disabilities if their response to appropriate, evidence-based instruction is substantially below those of their peers (e.g., Fuchs & Fuchs, 2006; Haager, Klinger, & Vaughn, 2007). In this presentation, information related to this framework of multi-tiered systems of support will be provided. The presenter will discuss research related to important aspects of this framework, including universal screening, progress monitoring, and appropriate levels of instruction and intervention. Although the discussion will be centered around those children at risk for reading disabilities, the concepts are applicable to other educational areas such as speech and language disorders and math.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss components of Response to Intervention/MTSS
  • Discuss issues to consider when choosing screening measures
  • Identify important factors to consider when planning intervention for struggling readers

Level of Learning: Intermediate

4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session 12 - Teaching Student Clinicians to Use Evidence-Based Practice for Preschool Vocabulary Instruction

Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP; Greta Hull, MS, CCC-SLP, from University of Missouri-Columbia; Abby Eubank, MS, CCC-SLP

The field of speech-language pathology emphasizes evidence-based practice (EBP) as the most appropriate approach for providing services in clinical settings. Despite a substantial evidence-base to guide the use of robust vocabulary instruction, it appears that there is limited implementation of EBP in vocabulary instruction in educational and clinical settings. In this presentation, we will share findings and implications for practice from a recent research project conducted to examine ways to teach EBP to undergraduate student clinicians. We will include an overview of EBP in explicit vocabulary instruction during shared storybook reading with preschool children using content developed as part of the project.

Participants were enrolled in a clinical practicum in a university-based speech and language preschool program and completed teaching modules that taught strategies for evidence-based vocabulary instruction during shared storybook reading with preschool children. During the semester-long practicum experience, participants were provided with brief teaching modules that taught strategies for evidence-based vocabulary instruction during shared storybook reading. Each week, participants completed short lesson plans and videotapes during shared storybook reading sessions with preschoolers. Half of the participants received brief, emailed performance feedback. After watching the modules, student clinicians were more likely to use evidence-based practices in their shared storybook sessions. For example, student clinicians chose more appropriate vocabulary words and used more child-friendly definitions. Participants who received emailed performance feedback indicated that the feedback was helpful in improving their use of EBP.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize key strategies in evidence based practice in vocabulary instruction
  • List challenges to implementation of evidence-based practice in clinical settings
  • Describe ways to design effective learning opportunities to increase use of EBP

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 13 - Surviving Supervision: Training in Paying it Forward

Melissa Passe, MA, CCC-SLP; Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP; Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A; Trish Hanson, MA, CCC-SLP, from Truman State University

As of January 1, 2020, every speech-language pathologist (SLP) who supervises a student or mentors a clinical fellow (CF) will need to have two hours of continuing education in supervision training. This presentation will offer introductory training in clinical supervision and will address the various supervisory needs of specific work settings. This presentation will be helpful to students as well as practicing professionals in the field as the presenters demystify the ins and outs of clinical supervision from both the student and supervisory perspective.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify important aspects of supervision as they relate to a school setting
  • Identify important aspects of supervision as they relate to a medical setting
  • Identify important aspects of clinical feedback
  • Differentiate between important aspects of supervision from a student's perspective and the supervisor's perspective

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 14 - What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Stronger

Cassie Gates, MS; Jennifer Fox, MEd, from Warrensburg R6

Therapy groups and classrooms, no matter the grade, size or subject, will require classroom management and behavior strategies. Many classroom teachers and speech-language pathologists feel the stress and may even feel inadequate when it comes to behaviors in their classroom. Being able to brainstorm different behavior strategies with practitioners in the field is a huge asset to having a successful classroom. We have taken numerous behavior strategies from our own classroom experiences and made them easy, quick and efficient so that any educator can implement them. It is our hope to lead an informal discussion of behavior strategies that educators can take back to their therapy rooms and schools the next day and see a decrease in negative behavior and an increase in positive behavior. We will allow professionals to ask, network and learn together in an informal format while providing our expertise on quick, easy and effective social, emotional and behavioral interventions. Student behavior in the therapy room, hallway, playground, cafeteria and classroom does not always seem to be what it used to be. Students themselves do not always seem to be the way they used to be. Whether it is an increase in students being identified with disabilities, an increase in student from lower socioeconomic status or an increase in students without social skills due to the technological world being such a focus with our youth, the behavior strategies discussed will be relevant to today’s students. We are passionate about teaching behaviors, not just assuming our student know how to act.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify relevant strategies for common behavior issues found in classrooms today
  • Distinguish why a behavior is occurring (the function) and be able to perform strategies in their therapy sessions, thus, increasing instructional time
  • Recall at least one of the discussed three-step strategies and perform that specific strategy to extinguish students’ negative behaviors while increasing students’ positive behaviors
  • Recall the information they have gained back to their school and share with colleagues/administrators/parents

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 15 - Brain Injury: Causes, Impact and Resources

Maureen Cunningham, CFRE, Brain Injury Association of Missouri; Charity Shelton, MS, CCC-SLP, CBIS, Mercy Neuro Outpatient Therapy Services

Brain injury can happen to anyone, anywhere and anytime. The results can include reduced cognitive functioning, limited mobility, vision, hearing or balance challenges and mental health disorders. Being aware of causes of acquired or traumatic brain injury, recognizing the signs of a potential undiagnosed brain injury and being familiar with community resources to complement speech-language pathology treatments are vital for best practice care for patients, clients and consumers impacted by brain injury.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify causes and types of brain injury
  • Discuss the impacts of brain injury for clients, patients and consumers
  • Make referrals to community based services to complement the care they provide for clients, patients and consumers

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 16 - Ethical Issues in Speech-Language Pathology

Klaire Brumbaugh, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Meghan Berti, MS, CCC-SLP, Therapy Lifetime Consultants, LLC; J. Gaylord, MA, CCC-SLP, Capital Region Medical Center

Speech-language pathologists face ethical issues, decisions and dilemmas on a daily basis. This educational session will describe ethical issues often faced in healthcare settings, school-based settings and in supervision of students and support personnel, as well as provide decision-making models to improve understanding and use of strategies to make ethical decisions. Examples of information that will be discussed are ethical considerations when adopting new assessments and ethical considerations during supervision practices. Analysis of the code of ethics put forth by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association will be used to support the ethical decision-making process.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Improve understanding of ASHA Code of Ethics
  • Explain ethical issues in speech-language pathology in various settings
  • Describe decision-making models to improve ethical decision-making

Level of Learning: Intermediate

5:30 pm - 6:30 pm Saturday

7:00 am - 8:00 am

8:00 am - 9:00 am

Session 19 - Finishing Strong: Clinical Fellowship Decision

Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

This program is designed for graduate students and focuses on the importance of making good professional decisions when choosing a clinical fellowship (CF) practice setting. A brief overview of potential practice settings, the importance of the CF-mentor relationship, how to find a job and common pitfalls to avoid will be explored. Understanding that the CF represents the final piece of a new clinician's education will be emphasized.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two potential CF practice settings
  • Identify three ways to find a CF position
  • Explain two elements of a successful CF-mentor relationship
  • Identify two positive and two negative signs when weighing a job offer

Level of Learning: Introductory

8:00 am - 10:00 am

Session 20 - Patterns of Development in Younger Siblings of Children With Autism

This session reviews patterns of development in younger siblings of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The recurrence risk for ASD in younger siblings of children with ASD is around 20% (Landa et al., 2007; Ozonoff et al., 2011). An additional 28% of younger siblings of children with ASD have been found to exhibit broader delays in development (but not ASD) (Ozonoff et al., 2014). These broader developmental delays were often detectable by first birthdays, using standard testing across motor, cognition, language, social and/or behavioral domains. Delays were commonly seen in social communication and interaction. Taken together, clinicians and families are motivated to closely monitor the overall development of high-risk infant siblings as well as implement appropriate early interventions as needed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the recurrence risk for autism in younger siblings of children with ASD
  • Describe patterns of developmental delay in younger siblings of children with ASD who do not have autism
  • Describe developmental surveillance needs of high-risk infant siblings

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 21 - Ensuring a Foundation for Communicative Competence: The Buck Stops Here!

Kimberly Gerth, MA, CCC-SLP, Rockwood School District; Cheryl Livingston, MS, CCC-SLP, Special School District of St. Louis County

Society associates independence with the ability to functionally communicate our needs and desires, to protest, to ask and answer questions, to advocate, to share information and to have social interactions. In our efforts to help students navigate their world, we often find they learn to take their cues from the adults in their lives and become prompt-dependent, rather than independent. Students with autism, multiple disabilities or other developmental delays may need structured, carefully-planned intervention and support from the special education team (including the family) in order to achieve communicative competence in a variety of settings and with a variety of communication partners. What is a speech-language pathologist to do with a young child who does not seem to want to interact with others, or with an older student who should already have these basic skills but does not? Where do speech-language pathologists even start? Are there prerequisite skills that a child must develop? What is the sequence to follow when teaching functional communication skills? How do you know what has been done with the child in the past, and how effective it was? What goals should be written? How is the student’s progress assessed? Looking at the big picture will help guide decision-making. Our session challenges participants to prioritize independent communicative competence at whatever age and stage the child is currently at. With a coordinated team approach, along with a conscious plan to avoid the creation or continuation of a prompt-dependent interaction pattern, the likelihood that the buck stops here increases dramatically.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role of the speech-language pathologist in collaborating with other members of the student’s team to create an environment which fosters independent communication skills
  • Identify the foundational skills that are necessary for a child to become an independent communicator with adults and peers in his environment
  • Describe the concept of basic self-advocacy and how it fosters communicative competence in students of any age
  • List at least two strategies for evaluating the current communication skills of a student, in order to see a big picture view of them and prioritize goals for intervention

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 22 - Instructional Techniques to Increase Early Literacy Skills in Young Students

Mindy Bridges, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas Medical Center

Early intervention with young children at risk for later having reading disabilities is critical to ensuring future academic success. Research over the past decades has provided much insight on the early skills that young children need in order to become good word readers and comprehenders (for a review, see Hogan, Bridges, Justice, and Cain, 2011). Such skills include letter-sound knowledge, phonological awareness, vocabulary and narrative language. In this presentation, a brief overview of these skills will be provided and then direct intervention techniques will be shared.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the importance of early identification for students at risk for later-reading disabilities
  • Name and briefly describe at least two skills that are related to later reading success
  • Apply intervention techniques to their own clinical practice

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 23 - Children With Hearing Loss and Diverse Needs

Christine Yoshinaga-Itano, PhD, CCC-A, University of Colorado Boulder

This session will present information about children who are deaf or hard of hearing from non-English speaking homes and those with additional disabilities. Forty-percent of children who are deaf or hard of hearing have identified additional disabilities, such as autism and cognitive disability. Early diagnoses of additional disabilities, such as autism, are critical to assuring optimal outcomes. Screening for autism and identifying risk behaviors in a child who also is deaf or hard of hearing is challenging but possible. Modifications of interventions typically effective for infants and/or children who are deaf or hard of hearing to be appropriate for autism or other disabilities, such as cognitive disorders or speech motor disorders need to occur as early as possible, to optimize effectiveness and require interdisciplinary collaborations. Additionally, a significant percentage of children who are deaf or hard of hearing are growing up in homes which are non-English speaking. These children may have Mandarin, Russian, German, Somali, Arabic, Farsi, Urdu, Tagalog, Cantonese or Spanish as the primary home language. The session will provide language outcome data on children in Spanish-speaking homes, and individual case studies of children in other language environments. Intervention strategies for infants and/or children who are deaf and hard of hearing and growing up in environments that are non-English speaking will be presented and will include information about determining whether their amplification (hearing aids and cochlear implants) has programs and maps that assure the ability to discriminate all phonemes of their home language.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify how to screen for autism in infants and/or children who are deaf or hard of hearing
  • Describe predictors of language outcomes of children who are deaf or hard of hearing in Spanish-speaking homes
  • Describe modifications of intervention strategies for infants and/or children who are deaf or hard of hearing to accommodate for learning spoken languages other than English
  • Describe modifications to typical interventions for children who are deaf or hard of hearing for children with autism

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:00 am - 11:00 am

Session 24 - Evaluating and Treating Adolescents and Adults Who Stutter

J. Scott Yaruss, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Michigan State University

This session will help speech-language pathologists provide comprehensive treatment for adolescents and adults who stutter. The session will begin with a brief review of a framework for understanding the disorder from the perspective of the speaker and suggest meaningful, practical strategies for helping speakers overcome the burden of stuttering. Strategies will address surface stuttering behaviors, negative reactions by the speaker and those in his/her environment, functional communication difficulties and the negative impact of stuttering on the speaker’s overall quality of life.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the factors that might bring adolescents and adults who stutter to treatment
  • Describe the entirety of the stuttering disorder based on the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)
  • Explain how treatment can address all of the components of stuttering identified in the ICF
  • Develop a comprehensive treatment plan for adolescents and adults who stutter

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 25 - Join the Revolution: Individuals With Aphasia Using AAC

Julie Hanson Gatts, MA, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

This first part of this presentation will provide a brief overview of the basic components that need to be considered when fitting an individual with an acquired disorder with an Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Device and/or Speech Generating Device (SGD). Several high-tech systems that are available and fit the needs of adults with acquired disorders will be presented. Discussion of various page sets and layouts within each will occur. Low-tech systems will be discussed very briefly and in the context of fitting individuals with something that provides them with a voice. Individualization of a page set within a system will be discussed as an important component to fitting and supporting for long term use of a system. Funding issues and resources will be presented. The second part of the presentation will focus on strategies for individualizing user layout, teaching effective use of the device and communication partner training as components to successful long-term use of an AAC/SGD. Evidence and resources related to use of AAC/SGD systems by adults who have aphasia will be shared. The importance of incorporating AAC/SGD at all stages of recovery for individuals with aphasia who need augmentation with communication will be emphasized. Funding issues and sustainability of intervention and use will be discussed as this can be a barrier for professionals and consumers.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three different user layouts on a high tech AAC/SGD that would be appropriate for an individual with an acquired disorder
  • Identify two guiding factors when individualizing a page set for an individual with an acquired disorder
  • Identify three different strategies to use when teaching an adult with acquired disorders how to effectively use their communication system
  • Describe at least three components of communication partner training and the rationale for it

Level of Learning: Intermediate

9:00 am - 11:30 pm

Session 26 - NSSLHA Share Session

Ashley Grohmann, University of Central Missouri; Kim Stewart, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Kaitlyn Fessler; Michelle Vomund, MEd, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

The NSSLHA Share Session will comprise of NSSLHA members and advisors from eight universities in Missouri. The members will share their chapter’s successes and ideas, as well as gain information from other chapters to improve their NSSLHA meetings, membership, philanthropic events and participation with National NSSLHA.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association chapter organizations
  • Explain ideas related to dues, philanthropic events, and professional advocacy
  • Improve NSSLHA Executive Board meetings to improve overall organization of the chapter
  • Describe the benefits with membership of National NSSLHA

Level of Learning: Introductory

9:15 am - 10:15 pm

Session 27 - Speech-Language Pathology Assistants in Missouri: Current Requirements and Use

Katherine Ermgodts, MA, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

In the state of Missouri, speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs) are defined as trained professionals who work under the supervision of licensed speech-language pathologists, helping children and adults improve communication skills. (Missouri Board of Healing Arts [BHA]). In Missouri, SLPAs may conduct screenings, implement treatment plans, document progress and assist the speech-language pathologist in assessment and treatment. Under state guidelines, SLPAs are not permitted to diagnosis communication or swallowing disorders, make eligibility determinations, conduct or interpret assessments or create or modify treatment plans. The Missouri Board of Registration for the Healing Arts (BHA) Advisory Commission is responsible for regulating SLPAs in the state. Missouri established state licensure for assistants in 2013. Recent research in the use, training and employment of SLPAs and their supervisors has revealed several themes related to assistants and their impact on the field. Some recent data indicates a potential need for education and training for SLPAs and supervising speech-language pathologists. The purpose of this session is to explore the current use, regulation, education and employment settings of speech-language pathology assistants in Missouri. Scope of practice and roles and responsibilities for SLPAs will be discussed. ASHA’s recommended scope of practice for SLPAs will also be reviewed and incorporated. Guidelines for supervising speech-language pathologists will be presented as part of this session.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the state licensing requirements for speech-language pathology assistants
  • Identify the requirements to supervise a speech-language pathology assistant
  • Differentiate the role and scope of practice of a speech-language pathologist and a speech-language pathology assistant

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:00 am - 11:00 am

Session 28 - Fostering Early Social Communication Skills Through Partner Games

Kimberly Gerth, MA, CCC-SLP, Rockwood School District

SLPs who work with young children with autism and other significant communication needs are always looking for ways to help students make connections with their peers, as well as ways that their peers can connect with them. These children often have a difficult time developing pretend play skills and may not interact with peers during classroom activities because they do not have basic turn-taking, sharing or language skills. Partner Games were developed in an attempt to bridge that gap and thereby give all children a common ground for interacting successfully. Independent participation in Partner Games may involve actions such as cooperative building, giving/receiving items, passing items and/or trading items. Early nonverbal communication skills are targeted: joint attention, anticipation and visually orienting to a peer. All games are relatively short to play and have a definite beginning and end, which helps children with predictability. Children participate in games with a peer partner and work together towards a common goal. Partners give each other a high-five at the conclusion of each activity, to celebrate a game well-played together. Based on preliminary results of Partner Games implementation, it is expected that students who participate will demonstrate increased joint attention, improved visual attention to peer models, higher levels of engagement with peers during center time, increased task persistence during play activities and greater awareness of peers as possible play partners. Children will also develop a foundation for social interaction that can then be expanded into verbal turn-taking and conversational skills.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the early foundational skills that are necessary to develop reciprocal communication interactions with peers
  • List the benefits and risks of providing different types of cues and prompts to young students with autism and related developmental delays
  • Identify ways that the use of Partner Games can lead to improved social language skills with peers

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 29 - Language Intervention in Multi-Tier System of Supports

Elizabeth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District; Patricia Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty School District; Dawn Callahan Dennis, EdD, CCC-SLP, EBS Healthcare

This panel of speech-language pathologists will present an overview of how language interventions can be utilized within a Multi-Tier System of Supports (MTSS) as an effective approach to improve educational outcomes for children. The panel will discuss collaboration of resources and strategies, opportunities for intervention and suggests for collection of progress monitoring data.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand how language interventions fit into multi-tier system of supports
  • Describe a variety of approaches to provide support for students in the areas of language strategies, intervention and data collection

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Sesion 30 - SBest Treatment for Phonological Disorder

Julie Hoffmann, MA, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

Come review best treatment methods for working with children with phonological disorder. Phonological Disorder has been well-researched and several approaches have proven to be very successful in remediation of this disorder. Learn how to expedite progress and increase speech intelligibility by making important therapy decisions related to therapy targets and approaches. Most current research will be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain current research on remediation of phonological disorder in children
  • Describe how to individualize choosing most appropriate sound targets and approaches for a children with phonological disorder
  • Demonstrate understanding of several phonological disorder therapy approaches based on EBP

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 31 - Traumatic Brain Injury in a Prison Population

Addison Pittman, BS; Paige Wilson, BS; Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Rockhurst University

This research examined traumatic brain injury (TBI) in incarcerated individuals and knowledge of individuals working with this population. This study employed a survey design to assess knowledge of brain injury in faculty providing courses and services to an area women’s prison. Additionally, focus groups were conducted with survey participants. Participants were presented with a fictitious case of an incarcerated individual with TBI. Participants were asked to discuss the case as well as provide opinions, perceptions and ideas on working with this individual. This study was conducted to add to the literature on working with individuals who are incarcerated with TBI.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • define traumatic brain injury and explain the signs and symptoms of such
  • Identify why there is a high rate of prevalence of TBI in a prison population and explain the importance of incarceration assessment and care availability
  • Discuss the influence of TBI on incarcerated individuals and understand other people’s opinions on the topic

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 32 - Issues in Licensure and Certification

Brenda Martien, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

This session will provide information regarding licensure and certification for SLPs and audiologists in Missouri. It will include recent changes due to legislative and regulatory actions and will allow participants to ask questions to assist in complying with Professional Registration and Department of Elementary and Secondary Education requirements. Some common issues that applicants for licensure or renewal of licensure will be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss requirements for licensure in the state of Missouri
  • List three changes in licensure and/or certification as an SLP, audiologist or SLP-assistant over the last three years
  • List four reasons licensure as an SLP or audiologist in Missouri may be denied licensure

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 33 - Thinking About a PhD

Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP; Stacy Wagovich, PhD, CCC-SLP, from University of Missouri-Columbia

This presentation will provide an overview of the process involved in obtaining a PhD in our discipline. Topics will include how to select a focus of study and a mentor, the typical timeline for completion of the degree, opportunities for funding and a general sense of what being a doctoral student is like. If you ae thinking you may be interested in a career in academia, now or in the future, this is the session for you!

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Outline the typical sequence of steps in completing a research doctorate
  • Consider the pros and cons of doctoral study and a research career
  • Describe experiences and funding opportunities available for doctoral students in our field

Level of Learning: Introductore

Session 34 - Dysphagia Evaluations: The Evolution of the Gold Standard

Mallory Moore, SLPD, CCC-SLP, CoxHealth

One of the greatest questions amongst speech-language pathologists providing services for individuals with dysphagia is finding the gold standard for assessing dysphagia. This presentation will explore the evolution of dysphagia evaluations, evidence supporting those evaluations and the latest research for instrumental swallowing assessments. New research findings specific to individuals with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis & Parkinson’s disease, via completion of simultaneous instrumental assessments, will be discussed. These findings will challenge the definition of what speech-language pathologists consider the gold standard in evaluation for those with dysphagia while encouraging speech-language pathologists to critically analyze the needs of their patients.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of the clinical swallow evaluation
  • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of instrumental assessments of swallow, specifically the modified barium swallow study and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallow
  • Explain new research findings that influence the gold standard of dysphagia evaluations

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 35 - Hidden Hearing Loss: Differential Diagnosis, Diagnosis and Clinical Cases

Wafaa Kaf, MD, PhD, C-AAA, FAAA, Missouri State University

Several adults with normal hearing sensitivity often complain of difficulty hearing with background noise. Comprehensive audiological evaluation should be performed to determine and distinguish between different pathologies that cause difficulty of speech perception in the presence of normal hearing. Is it an auditory processing disorder, an auditory neuropathy disorder or a hidden hearing loss? This presentation will highlight possible mechanisms of hidden hearing loss and test battery used to document presence of hidden hearing loss.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe clinical manifestations of hidden hearing loss
  • Explain hidden hearing loss and its mechanism
  • Discuss audiological evaluation specific to hidden hearing loss
  • Identify signs of hidden hearing loss from the case presentation

Level of Learning: Intermediate

12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

President's Celebration - Rediscovering My Identity

0.1 ASHA CEU available

John Kindschuh, JD, BA

I will discuss how my September 2013 cerebellar stroke initially stole my ability to talk and walk. Through many hours of therapy, I began relearning my faculties, especially how to speak again. For example, in my initial speech therapy (ST), I accomplished the following tasks, practiced minimal pairs with a mirror, watched how my lips and tongue formed differently for words such as bat, bet and bit, stated simple sentences, said multi-syllabic words, emphasizing the appropriate syllable in the word we were practicing, used a metronome to ensure my speech aligns with the beat, read poetry for inflection and built-in rhythm and other things. At Maryville University, I am asked to do more advanced things in speech, including the following breath support, volume control, pitch, use compound sentences, read passages approximately two pages in length, whisper, use smaller lip movements and avoid saying a final sound on words that end in -d, -w, -n or -ing. Of all the therapies, I will discuss how ST was the most difficult for me. You would think physical therapy (PT) would be the most draining because of the sheer physical exertion. Though I was tired after PT, I was barely able to talk after ST. My mouth was exhausted! I had to think about many different things that go into speech during the entire session. Every speech therapist would affirm that I worked very hard!

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify how many components go into relearning speech
  • Reinforce that speech therapists help people's lives
  • Encourage clients/patients to work extremely hard

Level of Learning: Advanced

2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Session 36 - A Framework to Enhance Social-Communicative Competence for Individuals With ASD

Colleen O’Leary Card, MS, CCC-SLP, BCBA, Special School District of St. Louis County

This session will provide an overview of the core social-communication deficits of individuals across the autism spectrum, and an overview of The SCERTS Model ®, a comprehensive, multidisciplinary educational framework designed to support children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The SCERTS Model® is a lifespan framework that can be used to support individuals of all ages and developmental abilities to expand their social and communicative competence. An additional session will provide participants an opportunity to develop an action plan utilizing the principles of The SCERTS Model® to address core developmental challenges faced by children with ASD.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify core challenges in social-communication faced by children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) at different stages of development
  • Identify core challenges in emotional regulation faced by children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) at different stages of development
  • Identify essential components of a comprehensive intervention program for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) based on core social-communication deficits and incorporating evidence-based practices

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 37 - How to Finally Clean Up That Pesky Lisp!

Julie Hoffmann, MA, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis Universitys

Both frontal and lateral lisps are often very difficult to treat, even when the SLP has been practicing for a number of years. Specific oral-motor and speech-production issues associated with lisps will be fully explained as related to strident sound productions. Come learn or re-learn a number of beneficial therapy methods to remediate the persistent frontal, lateral or mixed lisp.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe specific oral-motor and speech production issues that cause lisps
  • Identify several effective therapy approaches to remediate lisps based on issues causing each client's lisp
  • Explain facilitation methods for strident sounds s, z, sh, ch, and j

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 38 - Language Outcomes and Predictors of Children With Hearing Loss

Christine Yoshinaga-Itano, PhD, CCC-A, University of Colorado Boulder

This presentation will present longitudinal outcomes of children with hearing loss at seven years of age. Predictors that include both uncontrollable variables (cognitive ability, degree of hearing loss, mother's level of education) as well as controllable variables surpassing EHDI (Early Hearing Detection and Intervention) 1-3-6 guidelines, parent talk and language outcomes at 36 months when transitioning from parent-infant to Part B services. Information will also be provided about predictors of language outcome from over 400 participants from twelve states in a large cross-sectional study. Predictors of the population of children, as well as subgroups such as children with both bilateral and unilateral hearing loss and children with hearing aids and those with cochlear implants, will be discussed. Implications of these research findings on intervention strategies will be presented, including the use of LENA technology for progress monitoring of parent language strategies and characteristics of the acoustics of the daily language environment. Examples of how this technology has impacted individual case studies of children with diverse needs will be discussed. The use of this technology with children who do not speak English in the home (e.g., Mandarin, Russian, German, Spanish, Arabic), as well as children with and without additional disabilities, will be discussed. The technology has been useful screening for additional disabilities such as autism and speech disorders not attributable to hearing loss.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify both uncontrollable and controllable variables that predict language outcomes in children who are deaf or hard of hearing
  • Identify intervention strategies and progress monitoring strategies that can to monitor the variable of parent language
  • Identify strategies for screening for additional disorders in children who are deaf or hard of hearing that can impact speech and language development

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm 2:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session 40 - Early Childhood Stuttering Therapy: A Practical Approach

J. Scott Yaruss, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Michigan State University

Stuttering in preschool and young school-aged children can be one of the more challenging disorders for speech-language pathologists to treat. Many clinicians have wondered about which children need treatment and what are the most effective ways to help children overcome their difficulties with speech fluency. This session is designed to help clinicians answer these and other difficult questions so they will be able to provide effective treatment young children who stutter. The session will begin with an overview of key concepts in stuttering therapy, including specific techniques for helping young children who stutter improve their speech fluency and overall communication. The presenter will provide specific examples of treatment goals, strategies and therapy activities that can be adapted for a variety of settings. Particular attention will be paid to strategies for working with parents, including sample dialogues so participants will understand how to answer the questions parents often ask. Participants will have the opportunity to ask about specific children on their caseloads so they will leave from the session with a better understanding of the nature of stuttering and increased confidence in their ability to help young children who stutter and their families overcome the burden of this challenging disorder.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Develop individualized treatment approaches aimed at helping preschool children overcome their speaking difficulties
  • Effectively educate parents about three strategies for facilitating preschool children’s fluency at home and in other situations
  • Apply three strategies for helping preschool children improve their speech fluency directly
  • Describe two strategies for helping preschool children develop healthy, appropriate attitudes toward stuttering and their speaking abilities

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 41 - Aphasia Couples Therapy - Part 1

Larry Boles, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of the Pacific

This two-part session will cover Aphasia Couples Therapy (ACT) as follows. Part 1 will address the historical context. Although some may see this as a fringe method for delivering therapy, there is a 20-year history for social approaches that will reassure SLPs that others have blazed the trail. After this review, more specific information will be shared in Part 2 that documents ACT and some particular techniques within ACT that are beneficial to our patients. Evidence for the efficacy of ACT will be shared.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three studies that provide efficacy evidence for ACT
  • Identify three studies that provide efficacy evidence for social approaches to treatment of aphasia
  • List three goals that are objective, measurable, and reimbursable

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 42 - Why, What and How: Executive Function Intervention in Acquired Disorders

Julie Hanson Gatts, MA, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

This talk will present the WHY: A review of the evidence available related to intervention in executive function and associated disorders for individuals with acquired disorders; the WHAT: Discuss and brainstorm creating specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timely (SMART) goals for individuals with executive function and associated disorders; and the HOW: Present and discuss techniques and strategies for increasing independence in daily life through executive function and association disorders intervention.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Express increased confidence with being able to develop SMART goals related to executive function
  • Identify two new strategies to implement in intervention that will assist with improving executive function and related disorders

Level of Learning: Intermediate

4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

Session 43 - Evidence-Based Literacy Practices in Schools: What SLPs Need to Succeed

Mindy Bridges, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas Medical Center; Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri-Columbia; Jessica Smith, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

In this session, we will lead a discussion on the role of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in assessment and intervention in literacy. The ASHA guidelines (2000) are very clear that an SLP is part of the team of individuals involved in assessing and intervening in children with reading disabilities. The guidelines explain that SLPs have specific knowledge and expertise related to reading and writing and therefore SLPs should play a critical and direct role in the development of literacy for children and adolescents with communication disorders. It is imperative that we, as a field, understand the complexity of reading development and disorders in order to implement evidence-based practice (EBP) related to literacy. However, many SLPs may not have completed coursework nor had clinical experiences to prepare them for this responsibility. In fact, when reviewing course content related to top SLP programs in the country, only two programs included a specific course dedicated to reading and/or writing development and disorders. We will present results of a survey of school-based SLPs to explore knowledge of literacy as well as the challenges to implementation of EBP.

We will focus on three key questions: What knowledge do SLPs need to implement EBP in literacy in school settings? What skills do SLPs need to implement EBP in literacy in school settings? What supports do SLPs need to implement EBP in literacy in school settings? For each question, an example case will illustrate potential challenges facing SLPs, present relevant survey results and identify and discuss related resources.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the knowledge, skills and supports needed for SLPs to implement EBP in assessing and treating literacy development and disorders in school settings
  • List potential barriers to implementation of EBP related to literacy in school settings
  • Identify potential resources to support the use of EBP in literacy by SLPs in school settings

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 44 - Side Effects May Include Headaches, Nausea and … Fluency?

Matt Krause, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, University of Missouri-Columbia

There is no FDA approved medication for stuttering ... yet. However, there are and have been drugs in clinical trials exclusively for the treatment of stuttering. This session will review the historical and current research for the medical treatment of stuttering, discuss how this research relates to current understanding of potential causal mechanisms for stuttering and what SLPs should know to assist future clients who stutter.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Distinguish between previous and currently studied medications for stuttering and their respective chemical mechanisms
  • Differentiate between historical and modern causal theories for stuttering
  • Distinguish between the roles of physicians and SLPs in the medication prescription process
  • Differentiate between FDA approved uses for medications and off-label uses

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 45 - Interesting Audiology Cases: Bridging the Gap Between Audiologists and Speech Pathologists

Whitney Hayden, AuD, CCC-A; Jennifer Baird, MA, CCC-A, from Cox Health Hospital; Wafaa Kaf, MD, PhD, C-AAA, FAAA, Missouri State University

A series of interesting cases will be presented demonstrating the vast adult audiology patient profile and how bridging the interdisciplinary gap between audiologists and speech-language pathologists can provide the best care for patients who have strokes, ear cancer and other diagnoses. Also, some interesting rare, pediatric audiology cases and the role of the audiologist throughout the child’s development will be presented.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the variety of audiology cases with speech-language pathology-related issues
  • Discuss the importance of audiologists and speech-language pathologists working together to provide the best care for patients
  • Compare and contrast our individual roles while serving our clients

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Sunday

7:15 am - 8:15 am

8:30 am - 9:30am

Session 47 - Co-Teaching for AAC Therapy and Implications for Broader Application

Annie Filla, MA, CCC-SLP, Special School District

Multiple barriers to providing effective Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) therapy exist in the school setting. Some of these include management of negative behaviors, inadequate training of communication partners, learned helplessness and limited early success in functional communication. This presentation seeks to remediate some barriers to providing AAC therapy by outlining a program for applying co-teaching principles to therapy in the school and clinic setting. Over two years of implementing a co-teaching model for AAC therapy, student outcomes included decreased learned helplessness from over-prompting, increased carryover of skills to other settings and increased use of communication for a variety of functions. SLP outcomes included more accurate data collection, fewer missed therapy sessions and increased collaboration with teachers and support staff. Participants will learn principles of co-teaching as they relate to the field of speech-language pathology, as well as the broader application of co-teaching to training other school/clinic professionals and family members. Implementation ideas and resources, possible client goals and meaningful data collection ideas will also be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the six approaches to co-teaching and discuss the application of these approaches to speech/language therapy
  • Discuss two benefits and barriers to using co-teaching methods for AAC therapy
  • Describe the prompting hierarchy and its use in therapy for AAC users
  • Provide an example of how co-teaching principles can be applied when training other professionals and communication partners

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 48 - Tell Me a Story: Using Narratives for Assessment and Intervention

Laura Crites, MA, CCC-SLP, Special School District of St. Louis County

Narrative skills require well-developed language in all areas. Acquiring skills for story retelling increases a child’s ability to understand texts and events in their daily experience. Good narratives support writing and verbally expressing stories and experiences. Skills for retelling are acquired through models, explicit teaching and a framework for retelling. These skills develop as the child’s language understanding, vocabulary and cognition grow. Pragmatic language includes retelling comprehensible stories and events in a sequenced fashion, while considering listener perspective. Deficits in narrative language skills, especially after teaching, may indicate the need for further assessment. Working on narrative skills is a productive method for addressing language in an RtI model. This session provides a literature review, basic overview of narrative components, methods for obtaining a narrative sample, systems used to evaluate narratives and a model to teach narrative skills.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the key components of narratives for the purpose of assessment and identification of students who may benefit from RtI instruction targeting story retelling
  • Use narratives in therapy to improve targeted language skill
  • Locate and use a variety of tools to assess a narrative sample as part of a language sample and for progress monitoring purposes

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:30 am - 10:30am

Session 49 - Enhancing Social Communication: Hands-On Practice and Application

Colleen O’Leary Card, MS, CCC-SLP, BCBA, Special School District of St. Louis County

This session will provide an overview of the core social-communication deficits of individuals across the autism spectrum, and an overview of The SCERTS Model®, a comprehensive, multidisciplinary educational framework designed to support children with ASD. The SCERTS Model® is a lifespan framework that can be used to support individuals of all ages and developmental abilities to expand their social and communicative competence.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the core social-communication deficits of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) across different stages of development
  • Prioritize learning objectives based on core social communication and emotion regulation challenges of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
  • Utilize the SCERTS framework to develop a meaningful intervention plan for an individual with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 50 - Assessing Auditory Processing in Children: Appropriate Evaluations and Interpretation

Jay Lucker, EdD, CCC-A/SLP, FAAA, Howard University

Audiologists are asked to evaluate children for auditory processing disorders all the time. Most audiologists learn to use what is called a pass/fail approach in which the child is given tests and if the child passes all tests the child is not diagnosed with an auditory processing disorder. If the child fails usually two measures at -2 standard deviations or only one measure at -3 standard deviations, the child is identified as having an auditory processing disorder. This is the method supported by AAA, ASHA, EAA and others. Then, once the child is diagnosed with APD, a common list of accommodations and possible treatments are recommended by the audiologist, which can be called same size fits all. This presentation focuses on what auditory processing disorders are really all about focusing on a multisensory processing approach. From this approach the specific/different types of auditory processing disorders are described with the methods for evaluation each specific area or type of auditory processing disorder. The end result is to identify that a child has a very specific type of auditory processing disorder. The specific sensory systems that contribute to each type of disorder are discussed along with specific recommendations for accommodations and general recommendations for treatment based on each specific type.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the various types of auditory processing disorders using a multisystem approach
  • Identify the different systems involved in processing for each type of auditory processing disorder
  • Identify appropriate accommodations for each specific type of auditory processing disorder
  • Identify possible referrals that are needed when a child with an auditory processing disorder has problems involving different systems other than only the auditory system

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:30 am - 11:30 am

Session 51 - Aphasia Couples Therapy - Part 2

Larry Boles, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of the Pacific

This two-part session will cover Aphasia Couples Therapy (ACT) as follows. Part 2 will cover the ways in which the speech-language pathologist can use ACT in his/her practice. Audience participation will be encouraged and measurable objectives will be encouraged.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List three goals that are objective, measurable and reimbursable
  • Identify two traits that ideal candidates for ACT would have
  • Identify two exclusionary traits for people for whom ACT would be inappropriate

Level of Learning: Intermediate

9:45 am - 10:45 am

Session 52 - MATerials (Make And Take): Let's Get Hands-On With Professional Development!

Jeanna Antrim, MS, CCC-SLP; Maggie Judson, MS, CCC-SLP, from Belleville Area Special Services Cooperative (BASSC)

Come MAT with us! MATerial trainings (make and take) was a program developed by the presenters during the 2017-2018 school year to encourage increased AAC strategy, visual support, literacy and assistive technology use in the classroom. Teachers and related service personnel participated in trainings that provided evidence-based strategies to increase student's learning in the classroom setting. Participants experienced hands-on time with making materials that related to the information provided during the training. Pre- and post-surveys were provided to both obtain information regarding the comfort level and frequency with using visual supports, adapted reading materials, core communication boards and assistive technology in the classroom, as well as to gain feedback from the participants about the program. The participants reported an overall increase in familiarity and comfort with visual supports and adapted reading materials. MATerial Trainings were well received and will continue next year as a result. We want to share with you how we got this program off the ground, the topics we covered, the format we used and the lessons we learned. Participants of this training will have the opportunity to experience a shortened MAT training and walk away with an adapted book that they assemble and adapt. Please join us so you can MAT!

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss three ways to implement hands-on professional development training in various settings
  • Describe two benefits of participating in a hands-on professional development opportunity
  • Identify three strategies of an effective design and implementation of professional development

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 53 -Metacognitive Strategies to Improve Social Communication

Megan Reynolds, MA, CCC-SLP, Speech Language Learning Systems, Inc.

Students with social communication deficits often lack executive functioning and metacognitive skills. Self-awareness, self-monitoring and self-regulation are critical when learning and interacting socially. For students to become effective communicators and generalize pragmatic language skills, they must be able to recognize when and how to use those skills. Instruction in metacognitive strategies helps students become more self-aware and monitor themselves. This strategy-based presentation will provide an overview of metacognition and describe tools to support students’ active engagement in the social learning process during individual and group therapy.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe key components of metacognition
  • Identify executive function challenges in individuals with social communication deficits
  • List metacognitive strategies used to internalize social learning
  • Implement visually based, engaging metacognitive techniques

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:45 am - 11:45 am

Session 54 - School-Based Enterprises: Here You Go, Have a Nice Day!

Laurel Duever-Collins, MA, CCC-SLP; Christy Segress, BS, from Columbia Public Schools

Have you ever wondered if it is possible to have a school-based enterprise that is run by students with moderate to severe Autism and other disabilities? How about using this model to measure behavior, adaptive behavior, language, social, vocational, math and reading goals? What about having this program run by upper elementary, middle schoolers and high schoolers? It is possible! Come hear about how we started a coffee business at a middle school that has expanded into two other buildings and gives our students real-life experiences with work and adaptive skills that are difficult to teach in a classroom setting. We will discuss the process of setting up a coffee shop, how we maintain our products and cash-flow and what goals we measure and how we measure them. We will also give examples of growth we have seen in students who have worked in the coffee shop the last four years.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Start a school-based enterprise with students with moderate-severe disabilities
  • Measure student progress on a variety of goals during a school-based enterprise
  • Differentiate and assess ability levels of students to have a group that would allow a school-based enterprise to be successful

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 55 - No I.E.P. Required: Let's T.A.L.K.

Melissa Finneseth, MS, CCC-SLP; Kerry Boehm, from Lee's Summit R-7 School District

If you are looking for a proven and innovative way to address speech and language concerns without a lengthy evaluation and SPED diagnosis, this presentation is for you! Join Melissa Finneseth, speech-language pathologist and Kerry Boehm, principal, as they share the multi-tiered approach developed by Lee's Summit Parents as Teachers. Parent Educator training, parent/child communication consultations, home speech and language programs, T.A.L.K. groups and speech improvement services have been making an impact in the area of communication for over 15 years in the Lee's Summit community. Consider implementing these responses to intervention strategies in your school district, as well!

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List the multi-tiered approach to communication concerns being utilized in the Lee's Summit community and school district
  • Assess the similarities and differences between I.E.P.s and T.A.L.K. groups/speech improvement services
  • Understand the sources that may be available to fund a similar program in their school district

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:45 am - 12:45 pm

Session 56 - Appropriate Evidence-Based Treatments for Children With Auditory Processing Disorders

Jay Lucker, EdD, CCC-A/SLP, FAAA, Howard University

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are asked to treat children identified with an auditory processing disorder all the time. However, what is often a problem is that SLPs do not get sufficient information regarding what specific type of auditory processing disorder exists. They may be told the child failed this or that test, but not what specifically is deficient and how these deficiencies are affecting the child leading to the SLP being unable to treat each specific factor involved in the type(s) of auditory processing disorder(s) present. This presentation focuses on what auditory processing disorders are really all about focusing on a multisensory-processing approach. From this approach the specific and different types of auditory processing disorders are described, identifying the specific behavior and learning problems that are caused by each specific type of auditory processing disorder. After identifying each specific type, specific accommodations and mostly treatments will be described and demonstrated with audience participation so that each treatment is better understood. The focus of these discussions are on what goals are needed, as well as what activities and programs might be appropriate for use with children with different types of auditory processing disorders. Sample cases will be presented with discussion with the whole group about cases they might want discussed as examples.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the various types of auditory processing disorders using a multisystem approach
  • Identify the different systems involved in processing for each type of auditory processing disorder
  • Identify appropriate accommodations and treatment the SLP should recommend for children with different types of auditory processing disorders
  • Demonstrate various treatment strategies and activities to help children with specific auditory processing disorders

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Session 57 - How to Motivate Practice Beyond Therapy: A Hands-On Workshop

Rebecca Frisella, MS, CCC-SLP; Angela Adrian, MA, CCC-SLP, from Saint Louis University

Discouraged when you prepare materials for caregivers to practice in the natural environment and there is little to no follow through? Although research has proven that home practice accelerates progress, we have often experienced lack of carryover at home. This session is an interactive opportunity to create and apply simple, affordable and effective activities for home practice. First, we will discuss how to motivate caregivers to practice with their preschoolers. We will provide examples of various home programs that have been successful for preschool children with speech and language delays. Next, we will discuss specific cases and the different types of home programs implemented. We will then divide into small groups assigned with different case studies. Each group will develop their own home practice activities and present ideas and rationales to the entire group.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify specific techniques to promote carryover of language literacy and speech skills in the natural environment
  • Create individualized home programs that are easy, affordable and effective
  • Integrate information and discuss its application within the context of a case study

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Session 58 - Reflux Dysphagia, Polypharmacy and the Repeat Hospitalization Link

Jeanna Winchester, PhD, SLP-A; Carol Winchester, MS, CCC-SLP, from Dysphagia Management Systems, LLC

The consequences of dysphagia can be severe dehydration, malnutrition, aspiration, choking, pneumonia and death. This presentation will discuss the risks of dysphagia in patients utilizing more than two medications at one time that can cause gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Polypharmacy-related risks to reflux dysphagia and the increased risk of repeat hospital admissions will be discussed. Repeat hospital admissions correlate with a breakdown of the Five Systems of Dysphagia. They are frequent, costly, preventable and deleterious. The functional management of the Five Systems of Dysphagia is critical to reducing the likelihood for repeat hospital admissions through the management of risk.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List the risk factors for reflux dysphagia
  • Document dysphagia risks in patients taking medications for pain management and/or neuropsychiatric disturbances
  • Document the symptoms of dysphagia for each of the five individual systems
  • Demonstrate the possible strategies for managing dysphagia risk in patients taking two or more GI and/or reflux medications concurrently

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:45 am - 12:45 pm

Session 59 - Empowering SLPs: Hearing Screening, Amplification and Auditory Training

Maureen Fischer, MS, CCC-A; Saneta Thurmon, MA, CCC-SLP/A, from Saint Louis University

The number of students who are deaf or hard of hearing in the mainstream school population is increasing due to new technologies and more effective interventions. Recommended tools for hearing screening are changing. SLPs in the school setting are the go to clinicians for dealing with issues related to hearing and hearing loss. At this time, registered SLPs in Missouri outnumber AUDs about 10 to 1. Many schools have access to an SLP, but not an AUD. This sets up unique challenges for the SLP who may not have had training or experience in dealing with issues related to hearing and hearing loss. The purpose of this presentation is to inform SLPs who may feel they lack knowledge in dealing with issues related to hearing and hearing loss. Particularly, we will discuss a new method of hearing screening now recommended by ASHA for use in the six month-preschool population. We will discuss the best ways to find resources related to hearing aid and cochlear implant troubleshooting, as well as basic device troubleshooting. Finally, we will discuss incorporating AR goals into your student’s IEP. Armed with this information, it is our hope the SLP will feel more comfortable filling their important and necessary role as the go to clinician on all things hearing.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe appropriate hearing screening tools, per ASHA recommendations, for pediatric patients
  • Identify a few reliable resources for information on basic methods of hearing aid and CI troubleshooting
  • Formulate appropriate auditory training goals for IEPs from case studies presented in the course

Level of Learning: Intermediate

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Session 59 - The What, Why and How of Evidence-Based Practice

Lisa Goran, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri; Janet Gooch, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University /p>

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is essential for optimal service provision. This session provides a history and overview of EBP in the medical and educational fields. We will discuss the definitions of EBP used by SLPs and educator preparation programs and methods for the implementation of EBPs in the clinic and classroom. Common barriers and concerns about the use of EBPs will be discussed and practical resources will be shared. Participant outcomes include a working definition of EBPs and resources for implementation.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the similarities and differences in the definitions of Evidence-Based Practice used by SLPs and educators
  • Identify at least three common barriers/concerns related to using EBPs
  • Identify at least three practical evidence-based resources for educators and SLPs

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Student Technical Sessions

Friday, April 5, 1:00 pm to 4:15 pm

ST 1 - Increasing Narration Skills in Preschool Students

Kaitlin Hackbarth; Nicole Tonkovic; Adriana Arabas, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elminger, AuD, CCC-A

Previous research shows that increased narration skills in young children correlates with higher literacy skills later in their academic career. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to assess the narrative skills of preschoolers before and after intervention is provided. By assessing the narration skills of the students before and after intervention, we can assess whether the intervention was beneficial.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Define narration skills
  • List different types of narration skills
  • Describe how narration skills can be increased in preschool students
  • Describe how narration skills lead to literacy

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

ST 2 - Perception of Disability in Communication Disorders Students

Charlotte Hutchison; Melanie Jones; Amy Pattee, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elminger, AuD, CCC-A

Within the literature, there were numerous studies of various health-related fields, such as nursing, that gauged their perceptions on disability. Although there were not as many resources within the health-related field of communication disorders, our team found ourselves attracted to the disability studies minor that some communication disorders students at Truman State University choose to adopt. While this minor is useful in the field, we began to consider if the department itself adequately covers topics of disability. Ultimately, the purpose of this study is to compare the perception of disability between communication disorders majors with or without a disability studies minor throughout different times in the major. Given that the field of communication disorders often interacts with disability, it is important for these individuals to have a positive perception and accurate understanding of disability. Being current undergraduate students, our team feels it is important to analyze how prepared the future contributors to this field are to interact with disabilities on a possibly daily basis.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Compare and contrast the medical versus social model of disability
  • List three important considerations for communicating with someone with a disability
  • Identify behaviors of undergraduate communication disorders students towards concepts of disability

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

ST 3 - SLP’s Perspectives on Vocabulary Assessment: A National Survey

Brianna Guzman, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Sara Steele, PhD, CCC-SLP

This study will identify the various approaches used by clinicians to formally and informally assess vocabulary knowledge and word learning. Speech-language pathologists (n = 357) who work in school settings completed an online survey that included multiple choice, multiple answer and open-ended questions about procedures for identifying vocabulary delays and monitoring progress towards vocabulary goals. Percentages and frequency counts were calculated and a qualitative analysis of open-ended questions was conducted. Next, the survey findings were compared to literature on best practices for vocabulary assessment. In addition to researching vocabulary assessment within English speaking children, subtopics will be explored: hearing-impaired, bilingual and ELL children. Results will allow for a holistic understanding of how SLPs assess vocabulary in school settings.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Discuss how vocabulary is acquired at the school-age level
  • Describe the most important factors to consider when assessing vocabulary
  • Describe speech-language pathologists’ perspectives on assessing vocabulary
  • Identify the strengths and weaknesses of different assessment tools when assessing vocabulary

 

Introductory | Audiology

ST 4 - Articulatory Motor Performance as a Function of Phonetic Complexity

Mary Salazar, BA; Jessica Lisenbee, BS; Molly Sifford; Alex Linderer; Lori Bharadwaj; Ashton Strong; Morgan Hakenewerth, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Mili Kuruvilla, PhD

Current speech tests used for assessing dysarthria in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are relatively insensitive to dysarthria onset, which is insidious and highly variable. These tests rely on subjective perceptual judgments to estimate speech intelligibility and rate, which are coarse estimates of dysarthria severity with modest inter-rater reliability. Therefore, there is a significant need to improve diagnostic accuracy and progression monitoring so that clinicians can time speech interventions better. To address this need, the current study aims to determine word complexity effects on speech performance because early dysarthria in PD may be best observed during speech movements that are relatively complex. Our strategy is to compare tongue motor performance as a function of word complexity across 15 individuals with PD and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The target words vary in their motor demands, i.e., phonetic complexity, which was determined using a theoretical framework of speech development (Kent, 1992). While participants produce 20 words ranging in phonetic complexity, tongue movement data will be collected simultaneously using 3D electromagnetic articulography with sensors affixed to the tongue tip and dorsum. Tongue speed and range of motion from five to ten repetitions of each word will be averaged to determine between-group differences in tongue motor performance. Our preliminary data (n = 16) support our hypothesis that complex words are more sensitive to mild dysarthria in PD compared to simple words. These findings suggest that phonetic complexity may be an important variable to leverage in speech tests to improve diagnostic and prognostic accuracy.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Discuss the strengths and limitations of current dysarthria testing
  • Describe the effects phonetic complexity has on articulatory motor performance in progressive dysarthria
  • Explain the benefits of using phonetically complex stimuli in the assessment of progressive dysarthria
  • Describe differential impairment of the articulators in progressive dysarthria

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

ST 5 - Caregiver Interactions With Children 0-3

Nicole Batinick, BS; Valerie Hagedorn; Nicole Tonkovic, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elminger, AuD, CCC-A

The strength of a child’s oral language skills is related to their success with literacy. Literacy skills are predictive of long term academic achievement. Therefore, having a strong foundation of oral language skills is imperative for success in reading and in school. Research has shown how much children are spoken to from birth to three is correlated with language abilities later in life. The purpose of this study was to examine how many utterances are spoken to children ages zero to three by their daycare providers at Early Head Start (EHS) locations, because children in EHS are from a low socio-economic status and are at risk for language and literacy delays. Three observers collected the data from two EHS locations in Kirksville, MO. Preliminary data revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between how many utterances were spoken to the children at site one vs site two. Further research needs to be conducted to discover how often children are being spoken to by their caregivers at professional daycare settings as well as what training is given to the caregivers on language enrichment for the children.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the connection between oral language skills and literacy development.
  • Recall the criteria for a child qualifying for Early Head Start in Missouri.
  • Recall three techniques they can utilize to increase verbal utterances spoken to children in childcare settings.

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

ST 6 - Glottal Fry Usage Amongst Varying Ages

Jessica Holth, BS; Grayson Nickolaison; Abigail Fones, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP

Glottal fry is the frequent and over-use of the lowest of the three speaking registers in the United States. The objective of this research project was to find the age when glottal fry usage becomes significantly more prominent. Participants were between the ages of 11 and 25 years old and were not known to have disordered speech or hearing. Before granting consent, the participants were told that the researchers were looking at their speech characteristics while they read the Caterpillar Passage. They were also asked to answer a short questionnaire with items related to general health, vocal habits and entertainment influences. Results are not yet available, but will be reported once data collection is complete.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Define the term glottal fry
  • Identify the common age at which people start using glottal fry
  • Identify some factors, such as vocal behaviors and media influence, that may increase the prevalence of glottal fry

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

ST 7 - Downward Shift in Female Vocal Fundamental Frequency: 2012-2018

Erin Tippit; Allison Jarombek, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Dana Fritz, PhD, CCC-SLP

For the past six years, women aged 19-21 were asked to determine their vocal fundamental frequency using the freeware speech analysis program PRAAT. They were also asked to find their vocal range using the software as well a virtual piano or standard piano keyboard. Few research studies are available in current day that document female vocal fundamental frequency, although some evidence of a downward trend has been observed. In this study, median female vocal fundamental frequency shifted from 294 Hz to 220 Hz with piano keyboard correlates of D4 (above C4/middle C) to A3. Although vocal range has been found to be relatively stable in this study over time, a clear trend of women speaking at the bottom of that range has been noted.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Differentiate between fundamental frequency and vocal range
  • Identify decrease in fundamental frequency over time
  • Distinguish between factors influencing changes in fundamental frequency
  • Compare Hertz values with their piano keyboard correlates

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

ST 8 - Intervention for a Speech Sound Disorder/VPI From Cleft Palate: Case Study

McKenzie Kist, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Christi Baker, MS, CCC-SLP

This presentation will address the treatment and effects of intensive intervention for a severe speech sound disorder and velopharyngeal (VP) incompetence caused by a cleft palate. The subject of this case study is a nine-year-old female who underwent a second cleft palate surgery for VPI incompetence during the intervention period. Intervention prior to and following the surgical repair followed treatment guidelines provided by the Mercy Kid’s Cleft Palate Craniofacial Team in St. Louis, MO. The clinician-directed intervention approach focused on improving the client’s speech intelligibility by improving articulation, decreasing hypernasality and increasing her use of strategies during communication breakdowns.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe the impact of velopharyngeal insufficiency and hypernasality on speech intelligibility
  • Identify potential treatment strategies for clients with repaired cleft palates
  • Recall strategies that clients can implement during instances of communication breakdowns

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

ST 9 - Evaluation of an Early Head Start Screening Protocol

Christine Bollinger; Molly Stolze, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elminger, AuD, CCC-A

The purpose of this project is to determine if the information given by Truman State Speech and Hearing Clinic to Early Head Start program staff and parents regarding hearing screening results and follow-up actions is sufficient and easily understood. Subjects consisted of caregivers and teachers of two Early Head Start locations. The parents/caregivers and teachers filled out surveys after their child went to Truman Speech and Hearing Clinic for their hearing screening. Data collected from these surveys included how caregivers and teachers respond to and understand hearing screening results and what Truman State University can do to improve the information provision process.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe the importance of early childhood hearing screenings
  • Identify caregivers' and teachers' understanding of the hearing screening process
  • Assess whether caregivers and teachers are receiving adequate information regarding the hearing screening process/results

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

ST 10 - Effects of Tongue Exercise in a Rodent Model of Dysphagia

Erika Murphy, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Teresa Lever, PhD, CCC-A

The tongue plays a crucial role in the swallowing process and impairment can lead to dysphagia, particularly in neurological conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease and stroke. This project utilizes our previously established rodent model that develops dysphagia as a consequence of only tongue dysfunction. This model was created by injecting a toxin into the genioglossus muscle of the tongue for selective death of motor neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus, a brainstem region that directly innervates the tongue via the hypoglossal nerve. Our goal is to investigate the effect of tongue exercise on tongue function in three groups of male rats: 1) toxin injection plus exercise (n=7); 2) toxin injection plus sham exercise (n=7); and 3) control injection plus exercise (n=7). For each group, a custom spout with adjustable lick force requirement was placed in the home cage overnight for 12 hours on days four and six post-tongue injection. For the two exercise groups, the lick force requirement was set to 50 percent greater than maximum voluntary tongue force, measured using a force lickometer. Assessment of the following outcome measures is underway: overnight water consumption during exercise; baseline and end-line swallow function measured using videofluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) and baseline and end-line lick force measured using a force lickometer. Swallow metrics are analyzed using our automated VFSS analysis software designed specifically for our project. Results will provide insight regarding tongue exercise as a potential treatment to ameliorate alterations in tongue function in neurologically impaired patients.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Recognize the importance of including animal models in research
  • Explain signs and symptoms of dysphagia in neurologically impaired patients
  • Discuss emerging therapeutics for dysphagia in neurologically impaired patients

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

ST 11 - Current State of Collaboration Between Speech-Language Pathologists and Behavior Therapists

Beth Hickle, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Laura O’Hara, PhD, CCC-SLP

In both speech-language pathology and behavior therapy, best practice is interprofessional collaboration. However, this is not always the case. Collaboration may be limited or non-existent between these two fields, which may negatively impact client outcomes as behavior and communication are correlated, especially in populations such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study surveyed the current state of collaboration between certified speech-language pathologists and behavior therapists. Survey results were analyzed for trends and clinical implications were discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Discuss the importance of collaboration between the fields of speech-language pathology and behavior therapy
  • Identify ways to further collaborate with behavior therapists
  • Execute interprofessional collaboration between speech-language pathologists and behavior therapists

 

Intermediate | Multi-Interest

ST 12 - Attitude and Knowledge Towards Classroom Acoustics and Background Noise Remediation

In May 2010, the Acoustic Society of America and the US Access Board finalized the development of classroom acoustic standards. These recommendations set criteria for maximum background noise and reverberation time in unoccupied classrooms. These regulations have not yet evolved into laws yet, leaving them voluntary and oftentimes neglected to be implemented in classrooms (Knetcht, Nelson, Whitelaw, Feth, 2002). The purpose of this research project is to analyze and identify reasons why classroom acoustics regulations regarding unoccupied background noise levels are not being implemented into elementary school classrooms. Through surveying of a variety elementary school teachers in the Saint Louis area, information will be gathered on the compliance, implementation and knowledge of the detrimental effects of background noise in classrooms. After results have been obtained, directions for future research and/or trainings will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify three common sources of classroom background noise
  • List at least three detrimental effects of noise on student learning
  • Identify appropriate background noise levels that are most conducive to student success
  • Identify three reasons why classroom acoustics regulations regarding unoccupied background noise levels are not being implemented into elementary school classrooms

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

Student Technical Sessions

Saturday, April 6, 2:30 pm to 5:00 pm

ST 13 - Implicit Bias/Negative Attitudes Towards Individuals With Disabilities

Courtney Claxton, BS, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Klaire Brumbaugh, MS, CCC-SLP

Due to the nature of the profession, speech-language pathologists are in constant contact with individuals with a multitude of physical and intellectual disabilities, regardless of the professional setting the provider is in. While explicit bias (the expression of attitudes and beliefs about a person on a conscious level) may be less evident among speech-language pathologists, implicit bias (bias that is subtle or unconscious) may still be reflected in the service provided to an individual with a disability. To provide adequate services to individuals within various settings, it is critical for speech-language pathologists to have an understanding of what their own implicit biases and attitudes are when working with these special populations of differently abled individuals. Implicit bias and attitudinal scales have been developed to analyze implicit bias against individuals with disabilities. It is critical for the clinician to consider the methods of providing clinical services to these differently abled individuals, including wait time, tone, rate of speech and use of visual and verbal instruction, when evaluating treatment efficacy. The knowledge of what implicit bias is, how can be assessed, coupled with education on how to adequately provide services to these individuals, will be beneficial to future and present clinicians.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the prevalence of disability in the United States
  • Define what implicit bias is in regards to individuals with disabilities
  • Recall various scales related to disability bias and what this means for clinical practice as present and future speech-language pathologists
  • Apply techniques from literature related to effective and appropriate teaching strategies for individuals with disabilities to clinical practice.

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

ST 14 - Unraveling the Variable Clinical Phenotypes in ALS

Ellyn Andel, BS; Kathleen Lewis; Margaret Brothers, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Teresa Lever, PhD

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with no cure. Existing treatments increase survival by only a few months without any impact on functional outcomes. To hasten progress toward finding effective treatments, our lab has been studying a new mouse model of ALS that we have shown develops dysphagia as well as marked variability in limb paralysis, similar to people with the disease. Phenotypic variability in ALS has not been systematically studied, yet may provide important insights into disease pathogenesis and treatment discovery. The main goal of this study is to characterize the anatomical site(s) of onset (i.e., specific limb or craniofacial region) and pattern of disease progression in individual mice to establish a clinical phenotype classification scheme for this model. A secondary goal is to determine whether clinical phenotype is inherited. To do this, we studied one ALS-affected male breeder and offspring (n=29) from 4 months of age (presymptomatic) until disease end-stage (i.e., 20% body weight loss). Limb function was assessed weekly via walking corridor and clinical scoring tests. To assess craniofacial function, videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) testing was conducted monthly, and tongue force was tested weekly using a force lickometer. Data analysis is ongoing; however, preliminary results show that clinical phenotype is not inherited, and mice with forelimb phenotype have quicker disease progression and worse dysphagia than mice with hindlimb phenotype. Ultimately, we hope to use this mouse model to identify effective treatments for each ALS clinical phenotype, particularly those most affected by dysphagia.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Recognize the importance of using animal models in ALS research
  • Identify methods for early detection and pattern of disease progression in ALS
  • Discuss the translational implications of better defining the onset and progression of ALS

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

ST 15 - Leadership Roles Among Faculty in Higher Education Missouri CSD Programs

Marie Fleming, BS, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Mitzi Brammer, PhD, CCC-SLP

This study analyzes the gender differences among professionals within the fields of speech-language pathology and audiology. Furthermore, it describes differences among male and female faculty in communication sciences and disorders higher education programs, with an emphasis on leadership with regard to recruitment and retention. Previous studies have found that there is a disproportionate amount of male faculty in communication sciences and disorders programs compared to the national number of male speech-pathologists and audiologists in general. However, no research has been conducted that analyzes communication sciences and disorders faculty who hold leadership positions and if those positions are also disproportionately held by male faculty. Through a survey sent to communication sciences and disorders faculty of higher education programs in Missouri, it is hoped to discover whether or not there are significant gender differences in leadership. If so, the study will also begin looking at why such gender differences occur.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the number of women who hold leadership positions in higher education CSD programs in Missouri
  • Describe how men and women are perceived by others in terms of leadership within their department
  • Describe how men and women perceive themselves in terms of leadership within their department

 

Intermediate | Multi-Interest

ST 16 - Knowledge of Communication Disorders of Caregivers in Assisted Living Facilities

Katelyn Krull, Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

The purpose of this project is to investigate the extent of the knowledge of the employees working with residents at an assisted living facility regarding communication disorders and hearing loss. The mental wellness of the employees will be investigated, as well as the treatment of the residents and the communication between the residents and the employees. This topic is being explored because the researcher wanted to learn how communication disorders can affect those who are not directly affected by communication disorders, including caregivers and employees. The researcher was also interested in the level of education and training of communication disorders that employees at assisted living facilities receive. Additionally, the researcher has a family friend with a communication disorder who is a resident at an assisted living facility. A literature review was completed to collect background knowledge on the topic of caregivers of individuals with a communication disorder and hearing loss. Research about communication limitations, Presbycusis and caregiver mental wellness was found. Employees at assisted living facilities in Kirksville, Missouri are being surveyed to evaluate the perceived treatment and communication of the residents, the amount of education about communication disorders and hearing loss the employees received and how their job affects their mental wellness.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the amount of training and education of communication disorders and hearing loss a caregiver in an assisted living facility has received
  • Judge the quality of treatment offered to individuals with communication disorders or hearing loss in an assisted living facility
  • Analyze the quality of mental wellness a caregiver has from caring for individuals with a communication disorder or hearing loss
  • Discuss the amount and quality of communication between caregivers and individuals with a communication disorder or hearing loss in an assisted living facility

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

ST 17 - The Prevalence and Demographics of AAC Users Birth-21 in Missouri

Allison Phelps, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Gale Rice, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster will provide an overview of the existing research on national and state demographics of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) users, adding new information about learners ages birth-21 in Missouri. Results of an online survey collected from licensed SLPs in Missouri will be analyzed. A needs assessment for speech-language pathologists working with AAC users will be discussed. The clinical, sociological and legislative implications of data will be explained.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe the characteristics of learners who use AAC in Missouri and their communication systems
  • Identify three areas of need for SLPs serving learners who use AAC
  • Explain the implications of changing demographics and their impact on policy, clinical decisions, and social dynamics

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

ST 18 - Amplification for People with Aphasia (PWA)

Devin Fisher, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Amanda Eaton, PhD, CCC-SLP

Current literature suggests that amplifying auditory input may be beneficial for people with auditory processing deficits. However, there is limited research regarding the impact of amplification on speech comprehension in people with aphasia (PWA). The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of amplification on auditory comprehension in PWA. PWA and neurologically-normal controls with normal hearing were recruited from Fontbonne University’s Eardley Family Clinic and the general Fontbonne community. Auditory comprehension was measured in consistent testing environments with speech stimuli presented at 65 dB SPL (baseline) and 85 dB SPL (amplified) conditions. Condition and test order were counterbalanced across participants. Analyses included within-subject and between-subject differences on two listening tasks; discourse comprehension and direction following, with and without amplification. It was predicted that PWA would exhibit greater increases in comprehension in comparison to the control group when provided amplification. It was also predicted that PWA would demonstrate improved comprehension with amplification across tasks. Lastly, it was predicted that effects of amplification would differ based on aphasia sub-type. Results and potential clinical implications will be discussed. The poster will also provide a review of dissociated auditory comprehension deficits in PWA and explain the impact of impaired attention and resource allocation on diverse comprehension skills.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Explain the impact of attention and resource allocation on auditory comprehension deficits in PWA
  • Differentiate between narrative discourse comprehension and isolated-sentence/directive comprehension
  • Describe the potential use of amplification for PWA with auditory processing deficits

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

ST 19 - Listening Habits of College Students in a Workout Environment

Emily Alves; Jessica Holth, BS; Abigail Fones, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A/p>

Noise-induced hearing loss is preventable, but many young people do not use hearing protection and unnecessarily expose themselves to loud levels of noise through personal listening devices. The objective of this research project was to discover if there was a significant difference between the loudness level of music played on students’ devices in different environments. Participants were students at Truman State University who brought their personal listening devices to the student recreation center. A decibel level measurement of the personal listening devices was recorded as the students entered the student recreation center and after they completed their exercise regime.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the average decibel level Truman State students listen to personal listening devices in a workout environment
  • Distinguish student’s attitudes and habits towards listening to music during a workout using a personal listening device
  • Identify whether students are likely to change the volume of their music during a workout due to the presence of background music

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

ST 20 - A Case Presentation of Accent Modification With a Vietnamese Male

Taylor Wiseman, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Dana Fritz, PhD, CCC-SLP

A case study of a Vietnamese adult male participating in the MU Accent Modification and Pronunciation Program (MU AMP) will be presented, which will illustrate procedures that led to notable qualitative and quantitative improvements in speech and language production over the course of a semester. Qualitative outcomes included the participant's confidence and additional positive feelings about improvements in his English language performance in formal and informal speaking situations after participation in this program. Quantitative improvements will be illustrated using pre- and post-measures of performance on the Sentence Intelligibility Test (SIT). Results indicated that the participant's skills and intensive interest in participation as well as individualized and targeted clinician-driven activities were key to these positive outcomes.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify areas of speech and language often targeted in accent modification
  • Identify participant personal skills that led to positive outcomes
  • Name at least two speech and/or language activities appropriate for accent modification work

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

ST 21 - The Effect of Chronic Childhood Otitis Media on Learning Style/a>

Amy Donaldson; Melissa Hinckley, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

The purpose of this study was to determine whether students who have a history of otitis media as children and/or adults have a relative strength in visual vs. auditory learning. There has been little research completed that explored the secondary educational impact in someone who has a history of chronic otitis media. The study participants were undergraduates at Truman State University with and without a history of otitis media. The subjects were tested to determine learning style preference and which learning style resulted in greater information retention and success.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Differentiate between auditory and visual learning styles.
  • Describe how otitis media may impact preferred learning style and language.
  • List one way otitis media can potentially impact hearing sensitivity.

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

ST 22 - Clinician-Interactive Speech DDK Analysis Software

Brianna McCarthy; Ashley Kloepper, BS; Yang Yang Wang, BS; Ke Gao, BS; Tuo Zhao, BS; Minguang Song, BS, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Teresa Lever, PhD, CCC-SLP

Speech diadochokinetic (DDK) rate is widely used to detect dysarthria. However, there is abundant untapped information in the speech DDK signal that may facilitate earlier detection and better treatment monitoring of dysarthria. To extract clinically useful, novel information, we developed custom speech DDK analysis software with more capabilities than commercially available DDK analysis tools. Innovative aspects include a clinician-interactive interface to correct automated event detection/classification errors, quantification of syllable pronunciation accuracy and resultant syllable confusion matrix to guide treatment planning and quantification of speech rate alteration (decay versus acceleration). For preliminary software validation, we collected speech DDK samples from 17 healthy, young adult females using an iPad and our custom DDK app that guides participants through 12 DDK tasks in random order: three standard monosyllables (pa, ta, ka), one standard multisyllabic non-word (pa-ta-ka), two real-word multisyllabic alternatives (pattycake and buttercup) that are frequently used in clinical practice without corresponding published norms and six additional minimal pair syllables (ba, da, ga, la, ma, ha) for automated recognition accuracy training. Each 15-second DDK trial was repeated twice per participant. Audio samples (n=408) were analyzed with our custom DDK software and validated by manual review. Our software was >97 percent accurate for syllable detection and >89% accurate for syllable recognition. Speech rate decay (an indicator of fatigue) was ~10% for each trial. Software refinement is underway for improved syllable recognition accuracy and quantification of additional acoustic features (e.g., syllable shape, duration, rhythm, and amplitude) in preparation for validation with older neurotypical and clinical populations.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the advantages of having clinician-interactive capability in speech DDK assessment software
  • Recognize the importance of accurate syllable detection and its use in assessment and guiding treatment
  • List the strengths and limitations of existing commercially available speech DDK analysis tools

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

Poster Sessions

Friday, April 5, 5:30 – 6:30

SP 1 - Treating Speech Sound Disorders With Expansion Points

Ashley Gibson, BS; Miranda Zavadil, BS; Holli Meuschke, BS, from University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Klaire Brumbaugh, MA, CCC-SLP

Expansion Points (EXP) is a method that combines aspects of the traditional articulation treatment along with aspects of phonological treatment. This type of method differs from the traditional (TRD) method in many ways. A significant difference between the TRD and EXP method are the number of targets selected during intervention and the method of instruction. Guidance on how to select appropriate targets will be discussed and examples will be given. The method of instruction and teaching hierarchy will be outlined. Students will provide information on their experience utilizing the intervention hierarchy.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Understand how traditional articulation intervention differs from Expansion Points Intervention
  • Demonstrate ability to select appropriate targets and stimuli words
  • Understand what the Expansion Points is and how to implement it in therapy

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic.

SP 2 - Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Dysarthria: Characteristics, Intervention and Options

Natalie Sipole, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Amanda Eaton, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of the poster is to compare restorative and compensatory approaches for dysarthria in ALS. This poster will provide an overview of the dysarthria characteristics in patients with ALS, and treatment methods for improved communication. The success of interventions specific to speech production will be reviewed. Additionally the benefits and challenges of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices will be summarized.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Explain dysarthria characteristics associated with ALS
  • Describe the strengths and weaknesses of speech production, restorative and compensatory intervention approaches in the ALS population
  • Identify various alternative treatment options and the appropriateness of AAC devices for patients with ALS

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 3 - Therapy Techniques for SSDs Associated With Repaired Cleft Palate

Jessica Catlett, BS; Megan Kreitman, BS; Sarah Meine, BS; Anne Bedwinek, PhD, CCC-SLP, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Anne Bedwinek, PhD, CCC-SLP

ASHA Special Interest Group 5, Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, Continuing Education Committee offers this poster as a practical guide for therapeutic management of school-aged children with speech disorders associated with repaired cleft palate and/or velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD). Appropriate referral to a craniofacial team and evidence-based treatment techniques are emphasized.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe three general therapy guidelines for children with cleft palate speech or VPD.
  • Identify and describe common compensatory articulation errors associated with cleft palate speech or VPD.
  • Describe three specific speech therapy techniques to achieve correct articulatory placement.

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 4 - Hispanic Perspectives on Bilingualism and Bicultural Socialization

Madeline Reilly, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Deborah Hwa-Froelich, PhD, CCC-SLP

The Hispanic population is the largest and fastest growing minority in the US. Therefore, in order to provide appropriate services, it is important to understand the Hispanic culture. Currently, there is a disconnect between the number of bilingual speech language pathologists (SLPs) in the US and the number of English-language learners (ELLs) receiving speech and language services in the US. While about half of SLPs report that they provide therapy for Spanish-English bilinguals, few meet the requirements of a bilingual service provider or feel qualified in serving multicultural populations. Because Hispanic perspectives about child rearing and language learning may differ from those in the United States, SLPs need to understand these differences to work effectively with Hispanic parents and in providing appropriate services for Spanish-English bilingual children. The purpose of this study is to analyze parental perspectives about raising their children bilingually within a society that promotes a monolingual English-speaking culture. Spanish-English bilingual parents will be recruited and interviewed. Interviews and field notes will be analyzed through a tiered level of analysis.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe the relationship between cultural socialization and language acquisition
  • Describe Spanish-English speaking bilingual perspectives on child-rearing
  • Discuss how the information presented will guide clinical practice with Spanish-English bilingual parents and their children

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

SP 5 - Rhythmic Entrainment With Biofeedback for Acute Post-Stroke Apraxia of Speech

Laura Sankey, BA, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Whitney Postman, PhD

This clinical case report contributes to the literature on effectiveness of rate and rhythm control approaches to acquired apraxia of speech by describing a case of significant gains in response to Rhythmic Entrainment in the earliest phase post-stroke. It reports the remarkable progress in motor-speech control of DB, a 58-year-old, right-handed, college-educated, monolingual, English-speaking gentleman who incurred a left frontoparietal stroke on July 1, 2017. In response to one Hz auditory pulses and audio-visual and proprioceptive feedback, the participant demonstrated progress in independent motor-speech control for sentence production up to 11 syllables.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Define Rhythmic Entrainment according to the principles of Nuerologic Music Therapy
  • Explain the rationale for implementing Rhythmic Entrainment in treatment protocols for acquired Apraxia of Speech
  • Describe the therapeutic techniques of inner rehearsal, multimodal biofeedback and self-pacing as stated in this case study of Apraxia of Speech

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 6 - Awareness and Advocacy of Aphasia

Lizz Brooks, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Carmen Russell, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster will provide an overview of Aphasia and the importance of advocacy for both people with aphasia (PWA) and their family/friends as it relates to overall quality of life (QOL). Risk factors that impact these individuals such as identity loss, isolation, etc. will be distinguished. The available community involvement and supports, as it relates to improving QOL, will be assessed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Explain the importance of advocacy for PWA
  • Distinguish QOL risk for PWA (isolation, bullying, identity loss)
  • Assess various available supports in place for PWA and their family/friends.

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 7 - What Words Do Preschool Children Learn Incidentally?

Leah Moehlenbrock, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP

Incidental word-learning tasks provide information on how children learn new words from the context in which the words are presented. The purpose of this study is to describe incidental word learning in preschool children and present what types of words children learn incidentally. Performance will be compared to an explicit word learning task as well as standardized expressive and receptive vocabulary assessments. Twenty-nine children completed the incidental word learning task (IWL) along with an explicit word learning task (EWL), a receptive vocabulary assessment (PPVT-4) and an expressive vocabulary assessment (EVT-2). A short story was developed for the incidental word learning task, where we included eight target words (four nouns and four verbs). The target words were included seven times throughout the story script. Pictures were added to the script to create a picture book which was then presented on a tablet. Children listened to the story on two separate occasions. There was a wide variety of performance on this task, however, children learned an average of two words. Analyses were conducted to see what types of words were learned most as well as comparisons of performance on other measures. This poster will provide interesting information about how typically developing preschool children learn words in incidental and explicit word learning tasks.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Discuss patterns of performance on an incidental word learning task
  • Describe incidental word learning
  • Compare different methods of word learning and vocabulary assessments

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 8 - Self-Reported Vocal Hygiene Practice in Novice Singers: A Retrospective Study

Lydia Cameron, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP

Singers often experience vocal challenges that lead to poor performance, laryngeal discomfort, emotional stress and anxiety. Studies indicate that education about vocal health and physiology can help singers avoid the development of vocal disorders and help establish optimal singing and speaking behaviors. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of vocal hygiene strategies by novice singers and students majoring in vocal music. The study focused on the analysis of vocal habits, symptoms and the use of vocal hygiene strategies in a sample of 26 novice singers. Results were compared to the evidence-based, vocal hygiene strategies used by trained singers. This finding warrants enhanced collaboration among speech-language pathologists, vocal pedagogues and medical professionals in the education of novice singers on vocal health and hygiene.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the nature of self-reported vocal problems in novice singers
  • List various physiology-based vocal hygiene strategies that are used by novice singers
  • Describe various evidence-based vocal hygiene strategies that enhance both conversational and singing voices

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 9 - The Presence of Speech-Language Pathologists in Juvenile Detention Centers

Rachel Tope, BS, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Bonnie Slavych, PhD, CCC-SLP

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) work in a variety of settings including hospitals, outpatient clinics and schools, to name just a few. These settings are well known to both student and licensed SLPs and are frequently included within curricula and used for clinical training sites. However, a less frequently considered setting, such as the prison, also requires the services of SLPs. This poster will elucidate the SLP’s position within the juvenile prison system by discussing services provided in detention centers compared with services provided in more traditional settings, highlight differences in carriage and training of as well as tools used by SLPs serving youth within the prison system and identify potential risks that may result from not providing needed services to this population, including differences between the risks for this population compared with clients who are not in the prison system. Finally, this poster will outline research needs for service provision within the juvenile research system.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Discuss the SLP’s position within the juvenile prison system.
  • Distinguish between the methods of service provision in detention centers compared with those in more traditional settings.
  • Evaluate potential risks that may result according to levels of service provision to youth in juvenile detention centers.

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 10 - An Overview of Social Communication Disorders in Adolescents

Anna Templeton, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Laura O’Hara, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster will provide an overview of the definition, symptoms, assessment and treatment methods for social communication disorder. The impact that social communication disorder can have on adolescents will be discussed. The available treatment methods of social communication disorder will be summarized. The efficacy of using individual and group therapy for treatment of those diagnosed with social communication disorder will also be reviewed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Define and identify the symptoms of social communication disorder
  • Recognize the impact of social communication difficulties on adolescents
  • Analyze the available methods of assessment for diagnosis of social communication disorder
  • Assess various available treatment methods for social communication disorder

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 11 - The Effect of Integral Stimulation on Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

Shelby Jacobs, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Laura O’Hara, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this poster is to investigate the effects of integral stimulation on children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). While current research suggests similarities between NF1 and childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), there is no research to suggest that established treatment approaches used for CAS are successful when used on children diagnosed with NF1. The research behind Integral Stimulation and the shared characteristics between CAS and NF1 will be identified. The effectiveness of using integral stimulation for treatment of children with NF1 will be reviewed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Explain the basics of the integral stimulation approach.
  • Identify the similarities between NF1 and CAS.
  • Assess whether integral stimulation is an appropriate therapy approach for children diagnosed with NF1.

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 12 - Treating Broca’s Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech Using PROMPT Techniques

Jodi Niehoff, BS, Southern Illinois University of Edwardsville
Supervisor: Misty Tilmon, MA, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this research project was to determine the effectiveness of treating Broca’s aphasia co-occurring with acquired apraxia of speech with PROMPT techniques. The study included a 44-year-old male with a diagnosis of nonfluent aphasia and apraxia of speech, ten years post onset. The participant was involved in three treatment cycles, totaling 34 weeks. Baseline data collection included three, 30-minute sessions over the course of one week. During baseline sessions, the participant produced a list of generalization probes which included 20 target words and 10 functional phrases. The participant’s productions of the probes were transcribed. Treatment sessions implementing PROMPT techniques then took place for five weeks during 50-minute sessions, occurring twice a week. Following treatment, post-test data were collected three times in one week. Data was collected when the participant produced the generalization probes. All productions were transcribed. Each cycle concluded with a four-week withdraw period in which the participant received no intervention. Maintenance data was collected at the end of each withdraw period and a final maintenance assessment was completed following the last cycle of treatment and withdraw period. Progress was measured by assessing the changes in the participant’s ability to produce each target word and phrase before and after treatment.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe pre- and post-intervention performance of the participant
  • Identify the potential barriers of communication for individuals with Broca’s aphasia co-occurring with acquired apraxia of speech
  • Obtain knowledge regarding the implementation of PROMPT as a treatment technique for individuals with Broca’s aphasia and acquired apraxia of speech

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 13 - The Impact of Theory of Mind on Reading Comprehension Deficits

Lauren McClain, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Lauren Wright-Jones, MS, CCC-SLP

Reading can be a very complex process, especially for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Many students with ASD succeed in reading accurately and fluently, but lack awareness in identifying underlying meaning behind the text. This poster will provide an overview of reading comprehension deficits in students with ASD and the overall influence of Theory of Mind (ToM) on reading comprehension. Strategies for enhancing ToM during intervention will be reviewed and summarized.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify reading comprehension deficits in students with ASD
  • Discuss Theory of Mind (ToM) and its connection to reading comprehension deficits
  • Analyze Theory of Mind (ToM) intervention strategies and outcomes for students with ASD

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 14 - The Role of the Speech-Language Pathologist in Concussion Management

Amanda Brown, BS, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Greg Turner, PhD, CCC-SLP

Due to the complexity and high incidence of sports-related concussions, models of injury management have been developed to assure the athlete safely returns to play and back to their academic responsibilities. These multidisciplinary management models contain the use of many professionals in the healthcare field, at times including the speech-language pathologist. The purpose of this research is to review the sequela of the disorder and the role of the speech-language pathologist within these collaborative frameworks in terms of identification and assessment of student athletes who have sustained a concussion.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Define the nature of a concussion and recognize common signs and symptoms
  • Discuss concussion management as a multidisciplinary approach
  • Define the speech-language pathologist’s scope of practice within concussion management

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 15 - The Effects of Different Genres of Music on Reading Comprehension

Sara Stevens; Holly Applegate; Taylor Mekus, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

The purpose of this project is to determine how different types of music affect the amount of information a participant can recall. Participants were asked to read a passage and answer comprehension questions about the passage with different genres of music. Information regarding information recall in relation to the background music present was collected and analyzed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe the effects of listening to music on reading comprehension
  • Identify one way that background noise can impact auditory comprehension
  • Compare and contrast common decibel levels of music selected by college students when studying and its impact on reading comprehension

 

Introductory | Audiology

SP 16 - How School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists Utilize Classroom-Based Interventions: A Survey

Madeline Gaul, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this study is to determine how school speech-language pathologists (SLPs) across the country utilize different classroom-based service delivery models. Data were collected from a survey, using the online survey engine SurveyMonkey. The link to the survey was posted on the online community message boards of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Special Interest Groups 1, Language-Learning and Education, 16, School-Based Issues. Survey questions sought to answer the following questions: What are the factors that influence speech-language pathologists to choose classroom-based models? What are the most commonly used classroom-based models? How long do speech-language pathologists spend using classroom-based models? Do demographics affect the selection of classroom-based models? Data were analyzed through statistical packages provided by SurveyMonkey. Results of this survey will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the factors that lead school-based SLPs to utilize classroom-based interventions
  • Identify the most popularly used classroom-based interventions
  • Identify how long school-based SLPs utilize classroom-based interventions

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 17 - Perspectives of the Deaf on Speech-Language Services

Laura Sankey, BA, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Deborah Hwa-Froelich, PhD

Individuals who are attitudinally deaf, or Deaf, make up a small portion of the United States population known as the Deaf community, who often identify with the cultural model of deafness. This model emphasizes the positive ways individuals who are deaf differ from individuals who are hearing in language, experiences and values. One characteristic that sets Deaf individuals apart is their use of American Sign Language (ASL) as a primary mode of communication. Researchers have investigated the perspectives of the Deaf on professionals such as physicians and psychologists but not speech-language pathologists. Although these researchers identified that themes of miscommunication and distrust were common among Deaf individuals, it is unknown what themes may exist between the Deaf and speech-language pathologists. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of the Deaf regarding the speech-language services they received and what recommendations would they would give to future speech-language pathologists. Individuals who are deaf and communicate primarily through ASL were recruited and interviewed. Participants also completed a cultural identity questionnaire. A team of researchers coded the data, themes and domains that emerged. Results will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe the differences between the medical and cultural models of deafness
  • Describe practices of speech-language pathologists that are viewed positively by the Deaf
  • Learn about helpful intervention practices the Deaf would like to receive

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

SP 18 - Does Animal-Assisted Therapy Improve Motivation and Language Skills in Children?

Madison Henry, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Susan Fulton, PhD, CCC-A

In speech therapy sessions, children are sometimes reluctant to interact with the therapist. Children are more likely to be relaxed when interacting with an animal than with an adult therapist (Barker, Rogers, Turner, Karpf & Suthers-McCabe, 2003). In fact, improvements in communication (Boyer & Mundschenk, 2014), stress levels (Creagan, Bauer, Thomley & Borg, 2015), reading (Friesen, 2010), language production (Boyer, 2007), and interaction (Elmac, Cevizci, Elmac & Cevizci, 2015) has been observed when using Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT). Especially in language therapy, children must freely and openly express themselves for effective remediation. AAT may be a useful tool in language therapy. However, research is scarce. This study investigated the benefits of AAT for children diagnosed with language disorder. The study utilized a between-subjects experimental design in which participants were divided into two groups: AAT-first or wait first. Both groups received AAT and a wait period. The study was conducted at the Southeast Missouri State University’s Center for Speech and Hearing. Outcomes included the Pediatric Motivation Scale (PMOT) and measures assessing the participants’ progress in therapy. Measures were taken during pre- and post-testing for comparison in data collection. Results will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the benefits of animal-assisted therapy
  • Describe the differences in motivational measures between groups
  • Describe the differences in their language therapy outcomes

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 19 - Relative Fundamental Frequency During Vocal Loading Using Sentence Repetition

Erin Tippit, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Maria Dietrich, PhD, CCC-SLP

Relative Fundamental Frequency (RFF) is a change of frequency, in semitones, between the ten cycles of the vowels leading up to and following a voiceless fricative. Decreased RFF values are associated with less healthy voices. This study examines whether a vocal loading task has an effect on RFF over time, and whether there is a difference in RFF between teachers with vocal fatigue and controls. A hypothesized decrease of RFF would suggest a decline in voice function with voice use. It is also hypothesized that a difference in RFF between controls and teachers will be evident. Methods: The data are from a larger project on the classification of vocal fatigue using neck surface EMG. Fifty-two adult women, including a subset of early career teachers with vocal fatigue, repeated two sentences (The dew shimmered over my shiny blue shell again and Only we feel you do fail in new fallen dew) fifty-five times each. Audio files from the first, twenty-eighth and fifty-fifth repetition were analyzed for RFF using PRAAT following a protocol from the STEPP lab (Boston University). Though data analysis is ongoing, the preliminary data provide some results. RFF values for cycles furthest from offset/onset remain relatively consistent across time periods, but RFF values have decreased at the cycles closest to the offset/onset over time. Conclusions: Our results to date suggest that vocally fatiguing tasks may affect voice function over time as detected by RFF and that RFF may be a sensitive marker of vocal fatigue.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe voice relative fundamental frequency
  • Describe how relative fundamental frequency is related to vocal fatigue
  • Describe a vocal loading task

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 20 - Effects of Kangaroo Mother Care on Mother-Infant Interaction: Maternal Behaviors

Rachel Hearnes, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Marcia Brown-Haims, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of mother-infant interaction. In this study, a between-group design was utilized to examine the differences between the interactions of mother-infant dyads who engaged in kangaroo mother care and the interactions of infants who engaged in traditional care. This study took place in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) follow-up clinic in the Midwest. Data were collected in a room located in the NICU follow-up clinic in which investigators videotaped the mothers interacting with their children. Outcome measures included the Mother-Infant Communication Screen (MICS) and additional measures regarding the mother and infant’s communication behaviors. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and data analysis was completed using a Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA). Contingent ANOVAs were conducted for each variable. Results demonstrating the differences between groups will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the effects of kangaroo mother care
  • Identify psychological and psychosocial effects of kangaroo mother care for the mother and infant
  • Identify the differences in maternal behaviors between groups using kangaroo mother care and those using traditional care

 

Introductory| SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 21 - Effects of Kangaroo Mother Care on Mother-Infant Interaction: Infant Behaviors

Amber Mayfield, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Marcia Brown-Haims, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of skin-to-skin contact, also known as kangaroo mother care, on the interaction between preterm infants and their mothers. In this study, a between-group design was used to examine the differences between the interactions of mother and infants who engaged in kangaroo mother care and the interactions of mother and infants who engaged in traditional care. This study took place in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) follow-up clinic. Data was collected in a room located in the NICU follow up clinic in which investigators videotaped the mothers interacting with their children. Interaction between mothers and infants were observed using an adaption of the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (BNBAS). Data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, v24, 2016) and data analysis was completed using a Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA). Contingent ANOVAS were conducted for each variable. Results demonstrating the differences between groups will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the effects of kangaroo mother care on infants
  • Identify various barriers to the use of kangaroo mother care
  • Identify the differences between the interactions of mother and infants who engaged in kangaroo mother care and the interactions of mother and infants who engaged in traditional care

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 22 - Treatment of Executive Function Deficits in Adults With TBI

Haylee Freeman, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Carmen Russell, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster will provide an overview of the definition, symptoms and specific cognitive treatment for executive function deficits in adults with TBI. The specific area of the brain that is responsible for executive functioning will be discussed. Cognitive intervention, specifically memory and attention, will be summarized. The efficacy will be discussed in depth as well.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Explain the science of executive functions and how TBI affects it
  • Distinguish symptoms and how to identify executive function deficits
  • Assess various cognitive treatment methods for TBI, in particular memory and attention tasks and their benefits

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

Poster Sessions

Saturday, April 6, 7:00 – 8:00

SP 23 - Effect of Treatment Frequency on the Efficacy of Memory Intervention

Ashley Bachmann, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Misty Tilmon, MA, CCC-SLP

The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of treatment frequency on the efficacy of intervention for memory impairment. In this study, an experimental, single-subject design was utilized for the purposes of investigating the effects of treatment frequency on memory impairment and quality of life. The study included a male in his 70's with mild word-retrieval and residual memory deficits following a traumatic brain injury. Spaced retrieval was utilized for all recall tasks during intervention. Treatment was provided in three, three-week phases for a total of twelve weeks. The participant attended treatment four times weekly in the first phase, twice weekly in the second phase and four times weekly in the final phase. Outcome measures were obtained via pre- and post-testing of the participant’s memory status and perceived quality of life before and after each treatment phase throughout the 12-week intervention period. Progress was measured using informal testing probes and quality of life measures. Treatment outcomes will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the effect of treatment frequency on memory
  • Identify the effect of spaced retrieval on memory impairments due to traumatic brain injury
  • Identify the effect of treatment frequency and memory therapy on quality of life

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 24 - Maternal Diet and Autism

Courtney Porter, BS, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Klaire Brumbaugh, MS, CCC-SLP

Links to chronic disease, neurological development and fetal and neonatal growth have been tied to the maternal prenatal diet consumed (Hornstra, 2000). The research community continues to learn more regarding factors during fetal development that impact their growth and overall health. Countless variables are at play during the fetal development of a child, with more continually discovered, some of which are connecting to later diagnoses of specific neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism. Post-mortem studies of the brains of individuals with autism, report fewer neurons in the amygdala, fusiform gyrus and the cerebellum, as well as signs of persistent neuroinflammation, have been noted (Amaral, Dawson, Geschwind, 2011). A systematic review of the literature on the impact folic acid may have on neurodevelopment and specifically, autism diagnoses, was completed in 2016, revealing 15 studies indicating a beneficial neurodevelopmental outcome for the children who received folic acid in utero and a negative correlation with diagnoses of autism (Gao et al., 2016). Results of a larger study, consisting of 85,176 mother-child pairs, support the use of folic acid prior to and immediately following the time of conception for a lower risk of autism spectrum disorder (Suren et. al., 2013). As indicated from the above literature, maternal choices have consistently been seen as an important factor in the neurodevelopment of the child during pregnancy. While evidence is not sufficient to create a causal relationship, nor to narrow down specific factors at this stage, science is headed in a positive direction.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify potential risk factors associated with maternal diet and later diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder in the child
  • Describe the benefit of folic acid on fetal development as it relates to autism spectrum disorder
  • Compare and contrast finding of current research relating to maternal diet and autism spectrum disorders

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 25 - A Study of Public Awareness of Speech-Language Pathology Services in Guatemala

Courtney McVeigh, BS; Meagan Hale, BS, from Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP

Given the shortage of trained speech-language pathologists in Guatemala, the primary focus of this study was to elicit the perspectives and knowledge of parents dwelling in one of the villages regarding their awareness of speech pathology services. An interview questionnaire was administered to nine parents living in the village. The primary investigators, as well as two interpreter, fluent in Spanish and English, participated in the data collection. The primary goal of the questionnaire was to elicit information on awareness of speech problems in children, awareness of referrals for speech pathology services in the region and factors that create barriers to receiving speech pathology services. The survey questionnaire also included respondent characteristics, such as level of education, income, occupation, household members, etc. Information obtained from the parents indicated that they had some amount of knowledge regarding speech problems in their children. The major barriers to access of speech pathology services were lack of financial resources and transportation. Global healthcare professionals must be cognizant of the resources and barriers pertaining to the rehabilitation services in developing countries.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe the level of awareness of speech problems and speech pathology services in Guatemala
  • Describe how referrals are made for receiving speech pathology services
  • Identify the barriers (e.g., economic, geographical, transportation) to accessing speech pathology services

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

SP 26 - Functional Communication Training Via Telepractice for Children With Autism

Brookelyn Schwartz, BS, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Klaire Brumbaugh, MS, CCC-SLP

Many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit challenging behaviors (e.g., hitting, biting, screaming) as a means to communicate their wants and needs. These behaviors need to be addressed as they form a barrier to communication. One intervention method used to address these behaviors is functional communication training (FCT). FCT assesses the challenging behaviors that the child exhibits and replaces that behavior with a socially appropriate behavior that serves the same function as the challenging behavior. The literature supports FCT as an evidence-based practice and it is used extensively. However, with the ASD population continuing to grow, it is difficult for speech-language pathologists to provide services to all the children who need it. One solution to this problem is to provide FCT intervention via telepractice. Telepractice allows for intervention services to be provided from a distance using telecommunications. This allows for clients to be served in their natural environments. Additionally, it allows for SLPs to possibly serve a greater number of individuals. This paper serves to support the use of telepractice as a delivery method for implementing FCT to children with ASD.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe functional communication training (FCT) and how it is an effective intervention method to use for children with ASD
  • Identify benefits of telepractice as it relates to serving children with ASD
  • Identify the effectiveness of FCT combined with telepractice as a beneficial service delivery method for children with ASD

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 27 - Comparison Between Active Vocal Cool-Down and Silence in Acappella Singers

Savannah Moore; Savanna Ott; Gretchen Sadler; Abbie White, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP

Singers typically perform a vocal warm-up prior to practicing, as warm-ups are seen as a vital part of a rehearsal. However, information about vocal cool-downs has only recently emerged in the literature and tends to be incorporated much less frequently. Thus far, literature supports the potential benefit of vocal cool-downs to maintaining a singer’s vocal health. This study compared the post-rehearsal voice quality of acapella singers after finishing a vocal cool-down using either a five-minute Kazoo routine (as a semi-occluded vocal tract exercise) or a designated ten-minute period of silence. Each singer participated in two sessions using a repeated measures experimental design with counterbalancing. The singers were randomized to either a kazoo cool-down or silence for their first session. They completed the other cool-down at their second visit. An audio recording of the singers’ voices, in which they recited sentences, read a paragraph out loud, vocalized sustained vowels and sang a short song, were taken before and after their rehearsal and once more following the vocal cool-down. The computer program Computerized Speech Laboratory was used to complete an acoustic analysis of the voice recordings. After each recording, there was a three question assessment asking subjects to rate their voice on a scale of 1 to 10 (with 10 being the best) regarding effort used, comfort of voice and confidence of voice. Statistical analysis was used to determine benefits of cool-downs and whether one was better than the other. These analyses and results will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify what constitutes a semi-occluded vocal tract exercise
  • Identify the proposed benefits of a vocal cool-down

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 28 - Does School-Based Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) Benefit Language Skills?

Kristen Zahner, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Susan Fulton, PhD, CCC-A

Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) is a developing field and has shown gains in the emotional and functional status of humans. Many studies have also shown positive gains in improvement during recreational, physical, occupational and speech-language therapy with the assistance of therapeutic animals. From previous literature, animals have been used more often in occupational therapy, physical therapy and counseling than in speech-language therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate if AAT benefits receptive and expressive language skills in school-aged children with a confirmed diagnosis of a language disorder. In this pilot study, two children (ages five and nine years) were recruited to examine the effectiveness of AAT as compared to traditional language therapy. This study was conducted at a rural, public elementary school in the mid-west. Data were collected in the private speech and language room of the elementary school where the investigators targeted the participant’s specific language goals. Outcome measures included screening probes (not administered during therapy sessions) and a measure of motivation, the Pediatric Motivation Scale (PMOT). Results demonstrating the differences between groups will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the benefits and limitations of animal-assisted therapy
  • Describe differences between traditional language therapy and traditional language therapy incorporating animal-assisted therapy
  • Describe the differences between participants in therapy outcomes

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 29 - Lost Listening: Serving Late-Identified Deaf/Hard of Hearing Children

Alexandra Levin, BA, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Jenna Voss, PhD, LSLS Cert. AVEd

During this poster, participants will explore issues of late-identified hearing loss in children and the impact on communication development. Reasons as to why children may be identified after the 1-3-6 timeframe and red flags for hearing loss will be discussed. Interprofessional practice facilitates communication development within this population. Thus, strategies to be used by professionals and caregivers will be reviewed. Finally, examination of systemic and individual factors, which can improve outcomes for young children along with directions for further study, will be proposed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify five reasons why children may be diagnosed with hearing loss after the ideal time frame
  • Recall two potential negative communicative outcomes for children who have later identified hearing losses
  • Describe three to five strategies used by caregivers and professionals to promote communication development for children who are later-identified

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 31 - Overview on Feeding an Infant With a Cleft Palate

Jacqueline Loudermilk, BA; Megan Rehmer, BHS, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Anne Bedwinek, PhD, CCC-SLP

It is well established that infants with isolated cleft palate, with or without cleft lip, have feeding difficulties that require modifications and/or compensations (Reid et al., 2007). Some infants with cleft lip and/or palate experience only mild difficulties, while others may have more significant feeding difficulties (Masarei et al., 2007). This poster reviews the available evidence and expert opinion to report current feeding guidelines for infants with cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Strategies to facilitate feeding success and optimize growth and development are emphasized.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe three feeding difficulties related to cleft palate anatomy
  • List three professionals that assist infants with cleft palate in the feeding process
  • Compare three different compensatory feeding strategies and/or facilitative techniques

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 32 - Development of a University Based Parkinson Voice Program

Raina Bueno, BS; Jacqueline Loudermilk, BS; Sarah Meine, BS; Megan Rehmer, BS; Mary Salazar, BS, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP

Parkinson's disease insidiously robs individuals of the ability to be heard. This poster looks at the development of a grant-funded, university-based, multi-component program designed to improve the vocal intensity of people diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's Plus. Through a grant from the Parkinson Voice Project, faculty and students were trained in the implementation of SPEAK OUT!, the individual component of this program and the LOUD Crowd, the group maintenance component. Participants' improvement in vocal intensity, participant recruitment, challenges in program implementation and future direction of the program will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify appropriate participants for the SPEAK OUT! and LOUD Crowd program
  • Discuss ways to adapt the program for individuals with reduced cognition
  • Explain the importance of the maintenance component of this program

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 33 - Relationship Between Print Awareness and Language Development in Children

Bailey Benes, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Lauren Wright-Jones, MS, CCC-SLP

This poster will provide an overview of the definition, components and effects of print awareness in young children. The basic process of child development, related to print awareness, will be discussed. A variety of print awareness components will be outlined. The possible benefits that these basic print awareness components have on child language development will be discussed. The effectiveness of print exposure to a young child will also be analyzed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify various awareness components
  • Discuss the possible benefits of print awareness in child language development
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of print exposure to a young child

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 34 - Auditory Comprehension Changes in Wernicke’s Aphasia After Constraint-Induced Auditory Therapy

Allyson Heller, BS, from Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Susan Fulton, PhD, CCC-A

The purpose of this research project was to determine if auditory comprehension deficits associated with Wernicke’s aphasia improved upon receiving Constraint Induced Auditory Therapy (CIAT) intervention. CIAT is an auditory training program that aims to strengthen the auditory pathways of individuals with auditory comprehension deficits through explicit auditory training tasks. Dichotic digits are presented binaurally and the individual is instructed to identify which digit is heard in the deficit ear. The study involved one male adult in his 60’s with Wernicke’s aphasia and persistently severe auditory comprehension deficits. Over a four-month period, the participant received CIAT intervention during 12 bi-weekly sessions separated by six-week withdrawal periods. Outcome measures of this study were obtained via the following pre- and post- testing measures: Communication Confidence Rating Scale for Aphasia (CCRSA), the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39) and the Auditory Comprehension portion of the Western Aphasia Battery – Revised (WAB-R). Data collected as a result of post-testing measures were compared to the pre-intervention baseline phase, as well as to data collected as a result of the pre-testing measures administered after the withdrawal periods. Comparisons were also made to data collected during the intervention phase of the study.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the evidence-based approaches from which CIAT was derived (i.e., Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy and Dichotic Listening)
  • Identify the nature of auditory comprehension deficits associated with Wernicke’s aphasia
  • Describe pre- and post- intervention performance of the participant

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 35 - Motivation for Volunteering in Truman Students

Mikayla Kempf; Hannah Dunn; Kaylee Sisson, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

Many in the healthcare field are called upon to provide community outreach and service. This model of service often begins during the undergraduate years, with the hope to inspire a heart for service later in life for students. The purpose of this study was to explore the different motivational factors in undergraduate student volunteers. Students at Truman State University who volunteered for a communication disorders department event were surveyed. Survey questions were asked regarding their experience during the event, their motivation for volunteering their time and their perception of community service and outreach.

Learner Outcomes:

  • List two factors that might influence students to participate in community outreach activities
  • Describe the benefits obtained by the volunteers when being part of a community outreach experience
  • List one way community outreach and service can be included in the communication disorders undergraduate experience

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

SP 36 - Individuals With Language Disorders in the Juvenile Correctional System

Mary Salazar, BA, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Ashleigh Boyd, MS, CCC-SLP

Research suggests that individuals with language disorders and/or cognitive disabilities are disproportionately represented in the juvenile correctional system. The school-to-prison pipeline refers to a trend in which children are incarcerated due to the severe zero tolerance policies of the public school system. Often, these children are from disadvantaged backgrounds and may benefit from speech-language therapy services. A literature review was conducted to identify prevalence rates, risk factors and cultural disparities associated with individuals with special needs who are incarcerated. Suggestions for improvement and resources for individuals with disabilities and their caregivers that are a part of the juvenile justice system will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Summarize the overrepresentation of individuals with language disorders and cognitive disabilities in the prison system
  • Describe risk factors associated with the incarceration of individuals with special needs
  • Identify resources for individuals with disabilities and their caregivers

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 37 - Comparative Study: Clinical Speech Measures for Early Identification of Parkinsonian Speech

Lyndsey Rector; Jerrica Horn; Magdalena Schneider; Megan Kane; Kathryn Kohnen; Kelly Fousek, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Mili Kuruvilla-Dugdale, PhD

Dysarthria onset in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is subtle and highly variable. Diagnostic accuracy is further hindered by the current clinical assessment approach, which relies on subjective judgments of speech intelligibility. Although intelligibility testing is time- and cost-effective, intelligibility scores are often inflated during early disease stages because of compensatory adjustments across speech subsystems. There is an urgent need to identify measures sensitive to dysarthria onset that are easily administered in multispecialty clinics, where the time demands on clinicians are high. One such measure is the speech severity index (SSI), which relies on a visual analog scale, to determine dysarthria severity based on specific deviant features like imprecise articulation. Our goal is to determine the diagnostic utility of SSI by comparing intelligibility and speech severity scores for mild dysarthria due to PD. As part of intelligibility testing, 15 individuals with PD and 15 age-and sex-matched healthy controls will read aloud randomly generated, unpredictable sentences that are later orthographically transcribed by two sets of listeners with minimal and modest levels of experience with motor speech disorders. For SSI, the same two sets of listeners will use the intelligibility recordings to rate dysarthria severity, based on specific parameters related to voice, articulation and rhythm, using a sliding scale ranging from 0-100. Percent intelligibility and severity will be compared within and between groups. In addition, rater experience on intelligibility and speech severity scoring will also be evaluated. SSI is expected to be sensitive to subtle speech problems in early PD not captured by intelligibility.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe the strengths and limitations of speech intelligibility testing
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the speech severity index and its diagnostic utility for the early detection of progressive dysarthria
  • Explain how rater experience impacts scoring on intelligibility and the speech severity index

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 38 - How Confident are Speech-Language Pathologists When Treating Hard of Hearing and Deaf Clients?

Hannah Moll, BS, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Maureen Fischer, MA, CCC-A

More and more, students who are Deaf and hard of hearing are mainstreamed at an early age and receiving services within a typical classroom. The school-based speech-language pathologist (SLP) is the professional most suited to do device maintenance and support as well as aural rehabilitation with these students. A recent study examined the confidence of speech-language pathologists in North Carolina who served school-aged children with cochlear implants in the school setting. Of the 190 participants surveyed, 21 percent of the participants had little to no confidence in managing cochlear implant technology or providing services to children with cochlear implants. The purpose of this research project is to survey speech-language pathologists across the country and collect data on their training related to, and confidence with, treating students who are Deaf and hard of hearing and utilizing assistive devices. By surveying speech-language pathologists across the country who are placed in school settings, information with be gathered on courses taken at the undergraduate and graduate levels, Deaf and HOH clients treated during practicum experience and externships, practical training in the workplace and subjective confidence report. After results have been obtained and analyzed, educational and CEU opportunities related to treatment of this population will be explored and suggestions for further research and training opportunities will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify if speech-language pathologists around the country feel adequately prepared to treat patients who are hard of hearing or deaf
  • Identify formal instruction or courses that were given at the graduate or undergraduate level to the speech-language pathologists that participated in the survey.
  • Identify what, if any practical training was offered or given in the workplace to the speech-language pathologists that participated in the survey

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 39 - Outcomes of Melodic Intonation Therapy on Adults With Aphasia

Sharon Witt, BS, Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Shatonda Jones, PhD, MA, CCC-SLP, CBIST

The purpose of this systematic review is to examine the effectiveness of Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) for adults who exhibit Aphasia following a stroke. A comprehensive search of the literature was conducted to identify peer-reviewed articles published between 2006 and 2016. A quality appraisal was completed for sources meeting inclusion criteria to identify the best available evidence. The systematic review identified a total of eight articles that fit the inclusion criteria and were representative of the best available evidence. The participants in each study were individuals who were diagnosed with aphasia post stroke and their spouses. Research indicated that in general, MIT can have positive outcomes for adults with aphasia. MIT was shown to increase left-hemisphere activation, improve articulation, increase phrase length, language repetition and spontaneous speech. MIT did not result in improvements in the ability to answer wh- questions and spontaneous language in the studies used in this systematic review. There are still questions about the input of the right-hemisphere and when MIT best serves patients in the time frame of stroke or brain damage. Based on research found in this review, the impacts of MIT still need to be studied in-depth. MIT works for patients with articulation difficulties and increasing phrase length consistently.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the appropriate practice for using MIT with individuals that have aphasia
  • Identify weaknesses in research as it relates to MIT
  • Identify the benefits of using MIT with individuals with aphasia

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 40 - The Necessity of Counseling Courses for Grad Students in Audiology and Speech Pathology Programs

Amy Miller, Missouri State University
Supervisor: Wafaa Kaf, PhD

There are millions of children and adults alike in the U.S. who have some kind of communication disorder. Many families and individuals in this scenario experience grief and behavioral issues due to this change in their daily lives. It is extremely necessary for audiologists and speech-language pathologists to have counseling knowledge and training to guide their clients efficiently through the process of intervention. While many grad students are knowledgeable on disclosing information to the clients and using necessary courses of intervention, they are lacking the necessary training on personal adjustment counseling. This makes them unprepared when confronted with client’s emotional and behavioral issues. An assessment of the current graduate counseling courses in the audiology and speech-language pathology curriculum was conducted by searching available online curriculum of graduate programs in the U.S. Findings emphasize the importance of incorporating counseling courses and training in the area of personal adjustment counseling into audiology and speech-language pathology graduate studies.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe grief and other behavioral reactions associated with communication disorders
  • Explain some of the counseling methods used to treat these symptoms
  • Identify the lack of counseling courses within audiology graduate studies across the nation

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

SP 41 - Beyond Nouns and Verbs: How Word Characteristics Impact Vocabulary Growth

Greta Roettgen, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP

Since there are many clinical methods of selecting vocabulary targets, clinicians need to know which methods will produce the best learning outcomes. The purpose of this research is to examine how word characteristics impact children’s vocabulary learning. Rather than focusing on word class or part of speech, words were analyzed based on the perceptual accessibility continuum (Hadley, 2018). This scale characterizes words based on shape, concreteness and imageability. The shape of a word is related to the consistent form or representation of the referent. For example, a concrete noun would be given a high score for shape, whereas action verbs would score in the middle of this range. Concreteness is defined as the ability to learn the word meaning through personal experiences or through the senses. Words scoring low on concreteness include those whose meanings can only be explained through language. Imageability is the ease to which a word can be visualized. The sample consisted of 36 words chosen from the Story Friends intervention program. This program provides explicit vocabulary instruction through pre-recorded storybooks. The words were coded based on the perceptual accessibility continuum and given a total score. The perceptual accessibility scores were then compared to the word learning outcomes of 40 preschoolers who received Story Friends intervention. Preliminary results show a positive correlation between perceptual accessibility scores and the children’s learning outcomes. The perceptual accessibility continuum was also compared to current methods of classifying words. These results will help clinicians choose vocabulary targets and design vocabulary intervention.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Define the three aspects of the perceptual accessibility continuum
  • Describe how perceptual accessibility is related to word learning
  • Describe how the perceptual accessibility continuum can be used to choose vocabulary words

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 42 - Acoustic and Aerodynamic Profile of Early Career Teachers With Elevated Vocal Fatigue Index Scores

Allison Walker, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Maria Dietrich, PhD, CCC-SLP

Teachers are at a high risk for voice disorders with typical symptoms consisting of hoarseness and vocal fatigue. The Vocal Fatigue Index (VFI) is a new instrument to assess vocal fatigue. In this study, we investigated the correlation between VFI scores and cepstral-spectral measures of dysphonia and aerodynamic measures of vocal function in early career teachers with vocal fatigue and controls. We predicted that higher VFI scores seen in the teacher group correlated with lower voice quality and decreased voicing efficiency. The data are from a larger study classifying surface EMG signals from the anterior neck for the early detection of vocal fatigue. The study includes seventeen female early career teachers scoring above the norm (>=11) on the VFI factor tiredness of voice (VFI-1) and 36 controls scoring below (<=10). Acoustic measures included cepstral peak prominence (CPP), low/high spectral ratio and the Cepstral Spectral Index of Dysphonia. Aerodynamic measures included mean subglottic peak pressure, mean airflow during voicing and laryngeal airway resistance. Preliminary results indicate that mean CPP was lower in teachers than controls. VFI-1 scores correlated with the standard deviation of low/high spectral ratio. Further, teachers had higher laryngeal airway resistance (higher subglottic pressure and lower airflow) than controls in both normal and loud speaking conditions. Greater self-reported VFI-1 scores in non-treatment seeking early career teachers with vocal fatigue are linked with subtle differences in voice quality and voicing efficiency potentially underlying the experience of vocal fatigue.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Explain the link between high Vocal Fatigue Index scores and acoustic measures
  • Describe the Vocal Fatigue Index as a self-report measure
  • Describe the relationship between higher laryngeal airway resistance and greater vocal fatigue

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 43 - Impact of Aphasia Couples Therapy on the Primary Conversational Partner

Jessica Jump, BS, Maryville University
Supervisor: Renee Schuster, EdD, CCC-SLP

This study focuses on the impact of Aphasia Couples Therapy (ACT) on the primary conversational partner from participation in ACT. Treatment approaches based on conversational exercises are still new and underdeveloped. Although there is a small number of studies done, it is growing. ACT provides communication supports and strategies not only for the individual with aphasia, but their main communication partner, as well, promoting functional communication. Involving the main conversational partner also provides the opportunity for greater carry over, because they are able to continue to use the techniques they have learned outside the clinical setting. The purpose of this research is to determine which communication strategies are deemed beneficial for the individual with aphasia and their primary conversational partner. This study analyzes data from interviews of the primary communication partners of individuals with aphasia. The interviews are semi-structured, allowing participants to express themselves in their own way and pace, with minimal restriction on their responses. The participants are between the ages of 40-89, and the population has a mix of both female and male participants, a total of six participants. In summary, this study promises to provide information on the effectiveness of ACT.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify therapy strategies that bridge the communication gap between persons with aphasia and their primary communication partner
  • Distinguish common perceptions of primary communication partners
  • Recognize the benefit of involving primary communication partners

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 44 - Symptoms of Autism Emerging Before Twenty Four Months of Age

Carolyn Knothe, BA, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Klaire Brumbaugh, MS, CCC-SLP

A review of the literature suggests there is a constellation of symptoms that begin to emerge in autistic infants between two to twenty-four months of age. These symptoms are evident in several significant developmental areas including the motor domain, social-communicative domain and in formation and structure of the brain. If one were to summarize these results in terms of a timeline, the change in eye gaze/eye fixation occurs first, at two to six months of age. This overlaps with the pull-to-sit head lag persistence, which is noticeable as a delay by age six months. From six to twelve months, an abnormal pattern of gesture use emerges. By age twelve months, the autistic infant may show a larger-than-average head circumference due to excessive numbers of neurons. This head size will decrease to within the range of average by age 24 months but the autistic brain will still display disorganized and dysfunctional long-range circuitry with an over-abundance of short-range circuitry, especially in the frontal and temporal regions. While these early onset symptoms may be exhibited in infants later diagnosed with autism, they are not easily recognized or tested by parents or the pediatrician at the typical well-child appointments. Specialized training and/or equipment is needed to measure eye gaze, brain structure and to interpret gesture use. However, screenings by the pediatrician at the six-month checkup could easily include a pull-to-sit test, and a head circumference screening at the twelve-month checkup could be included in standard autism screening tools.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify developmental delays in the motor domain occurring before 24 months of age that are common to infants later diagnosed with autism
  • Explain developmental delays in the social communication domain occurring before 24 months of age that are common to infants later diagnosed with autism
  • Describe anomalies in the structure and function of the brain occurring before 24 months that are common to infants later diagnosed with autism

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 45 - Job Satisfaction and Age in Practicing Speech-Language Pathologists

Allison Johnson, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between job satisfaction and age in practicing speech-language pathologists (SLPs). A correlational study design was utilized to examine the relationship between age and job satisfaction. An online survey (SurveyMonkey) was posted on the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA) special interests group's (SIG) webpages. The SLPs volunteered and completed the survey. Data was collected through SurveyMonkey. Results demonstrating the relationship between age and job satisfaction will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Verbalize the relationship between job satisfaction and age
  • Verbalize the factors related to job satisfaction
  • Verbalize the relationship between job satisfaction and age related to the sex of the respondent

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

Poster Sessions

Sunday, April 7, 7:15 – 8:15

PP 02 – Teletherapy and the SLP's Role in Treating US Military

Carlotta Kimble, PhD, CCC-SLP; Courtney Porter, BS; Ashley Grohmann, from University of Central Missouri

The prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among active duty members overseas has increased substantially in recent combat, requiring the need for speech language assessment and intervention. Unfortunately, the necessary accommodations for medical treatment and speech-language intervention have been unable to match the alarming rate of TBI cases overseas. A promising solution that is becoming more widely accepted and researched is teletherapy. This poster presentation will describe the role of teletherapy in serving individuals in geographically remote locations, with particular focus on speech-language pathologists treating U.S. military personnel who have sustained blast injuries. Collaboration with other professions for a multidisciplinary approach, path to care and treatment options will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify risk factors of United States Veterans in regards to traumatic brain injuries and resulting communication impairments
  • Describe the role of tele-therapy in serving individuals in geographically remote locations
  • Describe key components of a multidisciplinary team approach in serving individuals with mild traumatic brain injury
  • Describe tele-therapy path to care options for military clients

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

PP 03 - Enhancing Life Participation in Persons with Dementia Through Socially Validating Story-Telling

Alana Mantie-Kozlowski, PhD, CCC-SLP; Jennifer Pratt, MA, CCC-SLP, from Missouri State University

Individuals with dementing illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease may face treatment that contravenes their human rights secondary to stigma and discrimination associated with their condition (Alzheimer’s Society, 2015). Research supports holistic, patient-centered approaches to care for this population of our society, yet clinicians often struggle with how to demonstrate that their services are skilled, reasonable and necessary, which is a requirement for Medicare beneficiaries. As such, persons with dementia may not be offered the services that they are entitled to receive. This is particularly distressing given findings that point to potential neuroprotective effect of engagement in cognitively and intellectually stimulating social and leisure pursuits for those with dementia (Cartwright & Elliot, 2009). In keeping with public affairs pillars of Missouri State University, this high impact project was designed to extend our students’ understanding of the cultural experience of living with dementia, and then offer strategies for providing appropriate and compassionate interventions to this population. Through participation in this project, it was anticipated that students would expand their depth of learning and critical thinking skills as they engaged with persons with dementia. With stronger skills, they will be prepared to advocate for this population thus serving as future ethical leaders, which would benefit the populations they serve and the broader society. Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify specific procedures to facilitate patient responses during story telling
  • Identify characteristics and behaviors related to engagement during social communication
  • Differentiate behaviors characteristic of productive vs. nonproductive engagement
  • Identify student learning opportunities that exist outside of classroom and university clinic parameters

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

PP 04 - Weaver Syndrome

Michael McKaig, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Oklahoma

In 1974, Weaver described a newly discovered syndrome characterized by accelerated growth, advanced bone age, and typical facial appearance. Most children with this rare syndrome have low-pitched hoarse voices and delayed language development. Since the time of the original 1974 report, approximately 30 additional cases have been reported. We are not aware of any published descriptions of speech-language intervention with Weaver syndrome children. The purpose of this poster is to report communication assessment and treatment data obtained during a 13-month period from a white male with Weaver syndrome from the ages of 1:11 to 3:0.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the principal physical characteristics of Weaver syndrome
  • Identify the language characteristics of a child with Weaver syndrome
  • Identify the speech characteristics of a child with Weaver syndrome
  • Identify the voice characteristics of a child withy Weaver syndrome

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

PP 05 - Speech Perceptions and Cochlear Implants

Brittany Anderson, BS, AAS, AS, Fontbonne University

Speech perception is different for every child. There will be different levels of hearing, different scores, different understandings and different ways of life. As professionals, we need to be there to support the children to make sure they are getting the best auditory and communication access as possible. Start with assessing the children, attend to their needs and capabilities, implement strategies and give the best assistance to better their comprehension and language.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Explain speech perception
  • Utilize strategies for speech perception
  • Utilize different assessments for speech perception

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 46 - The Relationship Between Cognition and Presbycusis: A Systematic Review

Lydia Cameron, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP

Presbycusis, a complex degenerative hearing condition, is one of the most prevalent chronic problems in older adults worldwide. The prevalence of hearing loss increases with age: three-quarters of those 70 or older have a loss in at least one ear (Goman & Lin, 2016). With a rapid increase in the incidence of hearing loss with age, older adults might experience cognitive deficits due to increased comprehension load, reduced social interactions, fatigue and depression (e.g., Fortunato et al., 2016). The purpose of this systematic review of the literature was to explore the relationship between presbycusis and cognition while documenting various theoretical constructs explaining the nature of cognitive impairments due to hearing loss. Based on a preliminary analysis of the articles published between 2010 and 2018, it was found that a relationship existed between presbycusis and cognitive decline in older adults. While providing services to older adults, it is important for healthcare professionals to understand how hearing loss impacts cognitive performance and overall quality of life.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify various biomarkers related to presbycusis and cognitive decline in older adults
  • Describe the nature of cognitive decline in older adults with presbycusis
  • Summarize the theoretical constructs that explain the associations between presbycusis and cognitive decline in older adults

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 47 - Effects of Social Stories on Behavior in Children With Autism

Alyssa Whitney, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Marcia Brown-Haims, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this research project was to determine the effectiveness of social stories in increasing positive behaviors and decreasing problem behaviors that are often exhibited by children on the autism spectrum. The study involved three children with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, enrolled in kindergarten at the Cape Girardeau, Missouri Public Schools. Participants were involved in the research study for a total of 15 weeks. Baseline data were collected through classroom observations and teacher interviews during the first two weeks. The participants then received eight weeks of treatment using social stories. Participants were asked to engage in research activities for twenty minutes a day for two days per week. During this time, the child received one-on-one treatment with the researcher in which he or she was presented with the individualized social story. Treatment was withdrawn for four weeks and reassessment and observations of behaviors occurred during the final week. During the withdrawal period, the social story was removed from the classroom. Following the period of withdrawal, the children were again observed by the researcher in the classroom setting and the teachers were interviewed to assess generalization. Data were compared to the pre-intervention baseline phase, as well as to the data collected after the four-week withdrawal period. Comparisons were also made to data collected during the intervention phase of the program.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the components of a social story
  • Differentiate between positive behaviors and problem behaviors
  • Describe pre- and post- intervention performance of the participants

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 49 - Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) on Language Goals

Callista Nickelson; Kristen Zahner, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Susan Fulton, PhD, CCC-A

Animal assisted therapy (AAT) is a technique which incorporates animals into therapy sessions to promote and improve a variety of patient-specific goals. Studies have demonstrated that patients who receive AAT experience a variety of emotional, physical and psychological benefits. AAT has shown benefit in various settings (e.g., counseling, educational and psychological). Limited research has focused on the perceptions of AAT from the clinician’s and animal handler’s viewpoint. In a companion study, two children from a rural elementary school in Southeast Missouri, each with a diagnosed language disorder, participated in a randomized split-group experimental design study in which they received language therapy both with AAT and without AAT. The animals used in this study were trained pet therapy dogs. For this study, qualitative data was collected using questionnaires aimed at assessing the supervisors and animal handlers’ impressions of language therapy sessions with and without AAT. Qualitative analysis of the data from all groups will be completed. Results will focus on the themes that surface as a result of that analysis.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the overall effectiveness of animal assisted therapy on language goals
  • Identify qualitative data collected from supervisors and animal handlers
  • Recognize limitations associated with Animal Assisted therapy

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 50 - Who Is Helping Whom? Sibling Influence on d/Deaf Communication Development

Emily Crouse, BA, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Jenna Voss, PHD, CED, LSLS Cert. AVEd

This poster will investigate the impact of typically hearing siblings (SIB-H) on the communication development of their deaf/hard of hearing siblings (SIB-DHH). To better understand the effects of sibling relationships on communication, this research explores the perceptions of adults who are deaf/hard of hearing and parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing on this area of development. Literature that examines the impact of sibling relationships on the communication development of typically developing sibling dyads, siblings with a disability and SIB-H and SIB-DHH dyads will be reviewed. A survey of SIB-DHH and parents of deaf/hard of hearing and typically hearing children will be discussed. Results of the survey will inform practitioners to better understand the impact sibling relationships have had on communication development and the implications for family-centered intervention.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Examine extant literature to understand the influence of typically developing sibling dyads on one another’s communication development
  • Analyze data to understand influence of deaf/hard of hearing sibling dyads (SIB-H and SIB-DHH) on one another’s communication development
  • Synthesize and disseminate findings to practitioners to optimize family-centered intervention to promote communication development

 

Intermediate | Audiology

SP 51 - Barriers to Evidenced-Based Practice in the Field of Speech-Language Pathology

Chanel Coyne, BS, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Bonnie Slavych, PhD, CCC-SLP

Students of speech-language pathology are instructed to utilize evidence-based methods of practice to provide the most current and highest-quality treatment for their clients. Information from textbooks, journals, professors, client interviews and other sources are readily available and appear to almost seamlessly inform the student's practice. From the student's perspective, therefore, incorporating the trilateral principles set forth by ASHA appears to be a no brainer and perhaps does not involve great effort. However, licensed speech-language pathologists may hold different views. This poster will report the results of a cross-sectional survey aimed to discover barriers to practicing evidence-based methods in the field and without access to university resources. The discussion will involve possibilities to negotiate identified barriers. Findings from previous and similar research conducted in allied health fields will also be discussed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Discuss common barriers to the application of evidence-based methods of practice.
  • Analyze identified and other barriers to the application of evidence-based methods of practice.
  • Develop a plan for negotiation of barriers to integrate evidence-based methods of practice.

 

Intermediate | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 52 - Making Dynamic Assessments More Dynamic: The Importance of Hierarchical Prompting

Raina Bueno, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Beth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster will provide information to help clinicians better understand the use of hierarchical prompting during dynamic assessment. Static measures capture what a child knows on the day of assessment, whereas dynamic assessments are a measure of learning. Hierarchical prompts on dynamic assessments can give important information about the learning process and can inform how much support clinicians should be using during intervention. The purpose of this study is to examine the extent to which children with high- and low-vocabulary knowledge differ on an explicit word-learning task, specifically on the frequencies of their responses to hierarchical prompting. Thirty-six preschool children completed a static measure (i.e., PPVT) and a dynamic assessment of word learning (i.e., Explicit Word Learning; Kelley 2017). The Explicit Word Learning (EWL) task is a structured word-learning task designed to measure word-learning in response to teaching. The EWL includes brief teaching trials across multiple days as well as hierarchical prompting with semantic and/or phonological cues and indirect modeling. Analyses were conducted to compare performance on the EWL of children with high and low vocabularies, specifically analyzing how children responded to the hierarchical prompts. Children with high and low vocabularies differed in performance on the EWL, and a detailed analysis of responses to the hierarchical prompts will be presented. Samples of hierarchical prompts will be included to help clinicians understand how to use hierarchical prompting on dynamic assessments.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Utilize hierarchical prompting during dynamic assessments
  • Utilize hierarchical prompting to gather more information about a child
  • Describe advantages of hierarchical prompting

 

Advanced | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 53 - Effects of Constraint-Induced Auditory Therapy on Auditory Comprehension in Aphasia

Megan Schmidt, BS; Lydia Cameron, BS, from Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Misty Tilmon, MA, CCC-SLP

This single-subject case study investigated the efficacy of Constraint-Induced Auditory Therapy (CIAT) for a participant diagnosed with Wernicke’s aphasia following a cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Deficits in auditory comprehension are a hallmark symptom of Wernicke’s aphasia, affecting speech comprehension, conversational skills and overall quality of life. Interventions aimed at remediating this deficit have received minimal investigative and conclusive research. CIAT provides auditory training through isolated dichotic listening activities, requiring the listener to attend to a stimulus in the ear which shows a deficiency and ignore a stimulus in the other ear. The underlying intent of this practice is to strengthen weak auditory neural pathways via neuroplasticity. Prior to the start of CIAT training, the participant completed a full hearing evaluation (pure-tone audiometry, tympanometry, speech recognition thresholds, speech reception thresholds and otoscopy). Outcome measures for this study were obtained via pre- and post-testing of the participant’s auditory comprehension status before and after a four-month-long period of intensive bi-weekly CIAT sessions. Pre- and post-test data were objectively tracked using the Dichotic Digits Test and Competing Environmental Sounds Test. These standardized tests provided a generalized means of evaluating the participant’s auditory comprehension neural pathway functioning and proficiency. If proven to be a significantly beneficial intervention strategy for the participant in this study, continued CIAT discussion and research should be conducted so that others with similar symptoms may also experience improved auditory comprehension and quality of life.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Discuss the effect of aphasia on dichotic listening
  • Describe CIAT training procedures
  • Discuss the benefits of CIAT training on auditory comprehension

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 54 - How Personality Traits of CMDS Students Affect Their GPA and Overall Well-Being

Adrian Mehrer; Lauren Boeding, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

Previous research has suggested that certain personality traits, such as conscientiousness, can positively impact a college student’s academic success. This study particularly focused on how personality traits of undergraduate students studying communication disorders at Truman State University affected their academic success and overall well-being. A survey was compiled to examine different personality traits related to the Big Five: extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, openness to experiences and neuroticism. The survey also included questions related to a student’s overall mental well-being while in college.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Distinguish between the Big Five personality traits
  • Identify common personality traits among communication disorders students
  • Differentiate between personality traits among communication disorders students that contribute to their academic success versus their overall well-being

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

SP 55 - Social Skills Treatment for Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Natalie Terbrock, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Barbara Braddock, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster will describe social deficits that may result in peer rejection and social neglect in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). An evidence-based treatment model designed to improve social skills, The Program for the Education and Enrichment of Relational Skills (PEERS; Laugeson), will be discussed. Research examining the impact of PEERS on adolescent behavior and neural function will be reviewed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe social deficits and resultant peer rejection and social neglect in adolescents with ASD
  • Identify key outcomes of PEERS social skills treatment
  • Examine behavioral and neural function following PEERS social skills treatment

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 56 - Comparison of Prosodic Characteristics Before and After Induced Tongue Fatigue

Michaela Yates, BS; Karley Smith, BS, from Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP

Dysarthria of speech is a neurological condition where speech intelligibility is compromised due to problems during the execution of motor speech movements. Speech-language pathologists are likely to notice generalized fatigue in patients with dysarthria. Fatigue may also be felt in orofacial muscles. Though the literature regarding the effects of orofacial fatigue on swallowing and speaking is notably sparse, preliminary evidence indicates that these functions are rather robust. Given the little research on the effects of orofacial fatigue on speech intelligibility and tongue strength in dysarthria, the purpose of this case study was to compare prosodic characteristics (e.g., intonation, stress, rate, etc.) before and after induced tongue fatigue. A 28-year-old female with spastic-ataxic mixed dysarthria participated in the study. Data on tongue strength were collected using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI) and the prosodic features in speech samples were collected using the SonaSpeech Program. Multiple data points from each session were analyzed using the Paired Samples T-test. Though there were no significant differences in prosodic measures and tongue strength before and after induced tongue fatigue, the study does offer clinical insights into the effects of fatigue on prosody and speech intelligibility that warrant further research.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe speech and prosodic characteristics in dysarthria
  • Describe how tongue fatigue affects tongue strength
  • Describe how tongue fatigue affects prosody

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 57 – Peer-Mediated Intervention to Improve Social Competence in Students With ASD

Margaret Walukonis, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Lauren Wright-Jones, MS, CCC-SLP

The increasing prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in students calls for an evaluation of the existing evidence-based practice regarding the treatment of social skills in elementary and middle-school aged children. This poster will provide an overview of the effect of ASD on the social competency of school-aged children. Peer-mediated intervention and its six categories will be defined. The efficacy of peer-mediated intervention will be reviewed according to the following treatment factors: category, environment, interventionists/peers, activities, maintenance and collaboration among professionals and caregivers.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Explain the effect of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) on the social competency of young students
  • Define peer-mediated intervention and distinguish between its six categories
  • Assess the research concerning the efficacy and factors of peer-mediated intervention and display the ability to develop peer-mediated intervention for students with ASD

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 58 - SLP's Role Increasing Executive Function Ability in Blast-Induced TBI Patients

Kara Johnson, BS, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Anna Campbell, MS, CCC-SLP

The research regarding blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is new and gained attraction and momentum over the past decade. A blast-induced TBI negatively impacts multiple aspects of an individual’s life including physical disabilities, sensory deficits, behavioral changes, swallowing difficulties, social aspects, emotions, mental health, communication and executive function skills. Executive functioning is the mental ability to process old and new information, use of working memory, inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, emotional regulation and sequencing internal and external information. This cognitive-linguistic impairment decreases the quality of life in an individual. A speech-language pathologist (SLP) will assist in the following impairments the patient may have due to their blast-induced TBI: motor-speech, language, feeding/swallowing, memory and executive functioning. The SLP strives to improve these areas to the level of function it was at prior to the injury, or as close as possible. Executive functioning is imperative to an individual’s well-being to socialize, maintain a job, and process their environment which makes the treatment process the SLP provides vital for the client’s quality of life.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Discuss the four types of a blast-induced TBI
  • Describe the numerous areas (i.e., cognitive-linguistic, feeding/swallowing, social pragmatic skills, emotional regulation, short-term and long-term memory, orientation and auditory comprehension)
  • Describe intervention strategies SLPs use to facilitate the best improvement of executive function skills in patients with blast-induced TBI

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 59 - A University Clinic LENA Project: Parent Coaching

Kristen Levri, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Jenna Voss, PhD, CED, LSLS Cert.

Parent and caregiver coaching is an important aspect of speech-language therapy. Sometimes, as a new clinician, it’s hard to effectively coach parents in ways that help them promote communication development. Having a tool such a LENA could help with graduate student coaching practices. LENA technology, a data collection system, allows clinicians to easily collect, process and analyze the input and output of a child’s language environment. Clinicians then share this easy to read visual feedback with parents during intervention sessions. This study utilizes LENA technology as a means to increase graduate clinician’s confidence and competence with parent coaching. This poster will discuss the results of this high impact learning practice and implications for use in a university clinic setting.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Explain the effects of LENA technology on graduate clinician parent coaching
  • Evaluate their own parent coaching practices
  • Visualize the use of LENA in a university clinic setting

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 60 - Speech-Language Pathologists' and Classroom Teachers' Perceptions of Classroom-Based Intervention

Leah Gibbs, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and classroom teachers on classroom-based intervention. A survey was utilized to examine attitudes associated with classroom-based interventions. The survey was designed using Survey Monkey and distributed through ASHA Special Interest Group 1 (SIG 1) and Special Interest Group 16 (SIG 16). SLPs who are members of either SIG 1 or SIG 16 were asked to complete the survey and recruited classroom teachers with whom they collaborated to participate. The survey results were collected and analyzed through Survey Monkey.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify the perceptions of SLPs about classroom-based interventions
  • Identify the perceptions of classroom teachers for classroom-based interventions conducted in their classrooms by SLPs
  • Verbalize the outcomes of the study regarding whether perceptions of classroom-based interventions may be influenced by the amount of time that the intervention is utilized

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 61 - Does AAC Hinder Speech Production in Children With Developmental Disabilities?

Hayley Brooks, BS; Cecilia Smith, BS; Megan Werner, BS, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effect of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) on verbal speech development. To accomplish this, multiple databases were searched with systematic criteria and ultimately eight studies were identified as the best evidence available for the research question. Results indicated that the use of AAC does not hinder the development of speech. Modest gains in verbal speech production were found in some cases. Critical to the success of AAC is adequate training during the device implementation phase. Clinical implications including the importance of educating family and caregivers as to the benefits of AAC will be presented.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Differentiate between low tech and high tech augmentative and alternative communication devices
  • Identify the benefits of augmentative and alternative communication devices on verbal communication
  • Recall the criteria for implementing augmentative and alternative communication devices to promote natural speech production
  • Recall the importance of family and caregiver education when implementing augmentative and alternative communication devices

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 62 - Evaluation of Speech Disorders Associated With Cleft Palate

Morgan Abegg, BS; Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Anne Bedwinek, PhD, CCC-SLP

ASHA SIG 5 offers this poster as a practical review of assessment and management approaches for speech disorders associated with cleft palate and/or velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD). Causes of VPD are outlined and types of resonance disorders are described. This poster focuses on differential diagnosis and management algorithms for addressing articulation and resonance disorders in children with repaired cleft palate and/or suspected VPD. Collaboration between the community SLP and the cleft palate team is emphasized.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify and describe the three types of velopharyngeal dysfunction (VP insufficiency, VP incompetency and VP mislearning)
  • Describe the obligatory speech features of VPD and differentiate these from compensatory articulation errors associated with VPD
  • Describe two specific evaluation techniques for assessing resonance

 

Introductory | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 63 - Families Supporting Pragmatic Skills of Adolescents With ASD

McKenzie Kist, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Ashleigh Boyd, MS, CCC-SLP

This poster presentation reviews how deficits in social communication, or pragmatic language, can impact the quality of life for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and identifies evidenced-based, caregiver-led intervention approaches for targeting improved pragmatic skills. Strategies for parents and siblings to implement at home to support a child’s development of social skills will be addressed. Resources for social skills training for Missouri families will also be provided.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe how pragmatic deficits can impact the quality of life of individuals with autism spectrum disorder
  • Identify potential caregiver-led intervention approaches for targeting pragmatic skills
  • Identify potential strategies that parents and siblings can implement at home to support pragmatic skills
  • Recall available resources for Missouri families for social skills training

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 64 - Broader Autism Phenotype in Later-Born Siblings of Children With Autism

Madeline Ince, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Barbara Braddock, PhD, CCC-SLP

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a genetically-linked neurodevelopmental disorder. Later-born siblings of children with ASD are at about 20 times the general risk for developing the disorder. Research also shows that around 20 to 30 percent of later-born siblings of children with ASD have a broader pattern of disability without meeting the DSM-5 classification. This broader autism phenotype (BAP) was characterized by mild autism characteristics, such as language delays, social difficulties and/or atypical behavior in early development, as well as increased clinical concerns, related to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) concerns, speech-language difficulties, anxiety/mood problems and/or learning problems in the school-aged years. The BAP will be discussed in terms of genetic risk and clinical implications for high-risk siblings.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Describe the genetic risk for later-born siblings of children with ASD
  • Define the Broader Autism Phenotype (BAP) term
  • Discuss clinical implications for high risk siblings

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 65 - The Segmental and Prosodic Approach to Accent Modification

Nicole Winter, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Laura O’Hara, PhD, CCC-SLP

 

This poster will provide an overview of the definition of the nonnative accent, identify deviating speech production patterns and determine when speech therapy is appropriate. Available treatment methods will be discussed. The efficiency of segmental and prosodic therapy approaches will be assessed.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify deviating speech production patterns that cause the perception of an accent
  • Determine when accent modification is appropriate
  • Assess current treatment methods including the segmental and prosodic approach to promote communicative competency

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 66 - Shortage of AAC Devices for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Briana Neavill, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Gale Rice, PhD, CCC-SLP

The reasoning behind limited usage of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) will be discussed. This poster will provide research-based evidence towards effectiveness of AAC devices for children with ASD. Solutions for children with ASD not receiving devices will be summarized.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Explain the benefits AAC may have for children with ASD
  • Describe possible reasons for the shortage of AAC devices for children with ASD
  • Determine solutions for AAC shortages

 

Intermediate | SLP-Pediatric Topic

SP 67 - Response to LSVT Loud® and Maintenance Services for Parkinson’s Disease

Jennifer Riley, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this case study is to compare the performance of an active person with Parkinson’s disease (PD) at the end of treatment with LSVT LOUD with her performance up to 10 months follow-up. Her post-intensive treatment will be compared on the basis of her active lifestyle during voice therapy treatment, her inactive lifestyle post-treatment and her lack of self-initiated daily practice with the LSVT LOUD home exercises. The study will also look at the participant’s current progress with a new voice treatment program for PD, the LOUD Crowd, and determine if it is possible for persons with PD to retain the effects of intensive voice therapy through group therapy alone. The hypothesis is that the participant will regain the speech and voice benefits seen with LSVT LOUD within two months of LOUD Crowd group voice therapy. LSVT LOUD and the LOUD Crowd are recognized voice treatments for persons with PD.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Distinguish the benefits of continuing maintenance services for voice therapy in Parkinson’s disease
  • Identify three important measures of vocal improvement after voice therapy
  • Explain whether follow-up treatment protocols are an essential component of voice intervention for persons with Parkinson’s disease

 

Introductory | SLP-Adult Topic

SP 68 - Self-Identity and Social Communication in Children Who are D/HH

Traci Henry, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Susan Lenihan, PhD, CED

A compilation of research on how self-identity impacts social communication in children who are deaf/hard-of-hearing and who use hearing devices (hearing aids, cochlear implants, etc.) will be presented. Current research on the topic will be included, along with recommendations for professionals. In addition, the poster presentation will include information on media representation of people who are D/HH and the importance of more inclusive representation of this population.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Identify how self-identity in children who are deaf/hard-of-hearing and who use hearing devices affect social communication development
  • Identify the impacts that positive media representation can have on self-identity development for children in this population
  • Identify suggestions and recommendations for professional for more inclusive materials and representations of this population

 

Introductory | Multi-Interest

 
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