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2019 Covention

MSHA Convention Program

Thursday Sessions
Friday Sessions
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Thursday

7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Session 1 - Round Robin

This informal session will allow presenters and attendees to converse and interact on topics related to research or clinical practice in speech-language pathology or audiology. Presenters will speak for 10-15 minutes on a research or clinical topic within their scope of expertise and allow 5-10 minutes of discussion and questions among the attendees.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the history of Missouri licensure and certification requirements related to the schools
  • Identify at least three issues impacting service delivery
  • List pending legislation impacting our professions at both a state and national level

Level of Learning: Introductory

8:15 pm - 9:15 pm

Session 2 - Ask MSHA

This session will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of MSHA Executive Board members and ASHA Advisory Council to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate level training programs, state licensure requirements and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s (DESE) implementer model. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Participants will be given an opportunity to ask questions and to contribute to the discussion.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Restate two main points from the presenter’s ideas or research
  • Cite two resources for further research on the topics presented
  • Articulate one way they could apply this new research or clinical practice in their work setting

Level of Learning: Introductory

Friday

8:00 am - 4:15 pm

Day Institute - Cognitive Rehabilitation: Practical Interventions and Personalized Planning

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Consultant

In this innovated day institute, you will receive instructions in 101 evidence-based techniques, strategies and interventions for all levels of cognitive impairment. Whether a patient presents with a mild head injury or severe cognitive impairment, this seminar teaches which approach to take and which avenue of interventions to pursue. The institute addresses the 8 Core Foundations of all Cognitive Domains, assessment procedures for each and discusses individualized therapy techniques. The Stages of the Patient Awareness and Acceptance of their Deficit is discussed in length followed with interventions techniques for each Stage. You will be presented with techniques that will change the brains neuroplasticity, as well as offer compensatory strategies and enhance a person’s procedure memory. This institute emphasizes the importance and effectiveness of creating highly individualized treatment strategies and provides attendees with the needed skills to choose and adapt techniques into tailored, personalized therapy plans. Active case studies will be examined and participants will learn to design a patient profile with therapy interventions and document goals according to Medicare Regulations.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain 101 Cognitive therapy techniques addressing all levels of cognitive impairments
  • Describe knowledge on changing the brains neuroplasticity by discussing State-of-the-Art techniques
  • Identify patients levels of awareness and acceptance, their self-efficacy and how to facilitate the patients ownership of their therapy goals and program
  • Document patient-centered goals, measure progress and justify medical necessity

Level of Learning: Advanced

Day Institute - Master Self-Regulation to Transform Aggression Into Communication, Tantrums Into Self Control and Defiance Into Cooperation

Jill A. Molli, MEd, Loving Guidance, Inc.

Self-regulation is the ability to manage our thoughts, feelings and actions in service of a goal. It is also about effectively using emotions as signals that alert us to the actions needed to sustain a relationship. We are social beings with social brains. Our relationships with others are what sustains us or destroys us. Aggression, tantrums and defiance are psychological signals that direct us to change our behavior, much like physiological signals of thirst, hunger and tiredness direct us to drink, eat and sleep. Ignoring children's internal states (a common practice) risks malnourishing their social-emotional development, much like ignoring hunger risks malnourishing their physical growth. Discipline is not something you do to children. It is something you develop within them. Our internal guidance system consists of our emotions and feelings. Most adults struggle to access this basic system and, as a consequence, find it difficult to help children learn to listen to theirs. The adult often overlays the child's existing internal guidance with a secondary system that seeks approval or attempts to control others, rather than depending on the innate wisdom of internally motivated self-regulation. This day institute seeks to help adults unravel and discover their own self-regulation issues. It then provides concrete skills and lessons for adults to help children develop theirs. Our relationship with our emotions shapes our brains, perceptions, potential for success and the health of all our relationships. In this institute, you will learn the five steps to self-regulation in order to transform upset into life skills.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify how the brain learns to self-regulate
  • Identify how to literally wire children for self-control
  • Identify the five essential steps in teaching positive behavior
  • Describe how to create and implement a safe place in a classroom

Level of Learning: Introductory

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Session 3 - Using Natural Language Development to Guide AAC Intervention

Gretchen Bright, BS, Prentke Romich Company

Many SLPs exit graduate school with a strong understanding of Brown’s Stages of Language Development. Those insightful stages provide a clear direction when working with children with language delays. When AAC is introduced to our non-verbal clients, we should not deviate from the guidance of Brown’s Stages. Furthermore, the neurology of how words are learned also needs to be taken into consideration and applied when using AAC. In this session, we will examine both critical aspects of language development, as well as the tools, resources and therapy approaches that are available to effectively teach language to those who are non-verbal.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the stages of language development
  • Utilize AAC therapy approaches to teach language in a stage-based way
  • List at least three natural language teaching techniques used with verbal children that can be carried over to AAC

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 4 - Development of Inner Ear Gene Therapy as a Treatment for Hearing Loss and Dizziness

Wade Chien, MD, FACS, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Hearing loss and dizziness are common disorders affecting the world’s population today. Unfortunately, the current treatment options for these patients are limited. Gene therapy is a promising treatment modality that has the potential of reversing the disease process in the inner ear. In this session, we will discuss the progress that has been made in developing gene therapy as a treatment for hearing loss and dizziness and the challenges that lie ahead in translating gene therapy from the bench to bedside.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Become familiar with the concept of inner ear gene therapy
  • Become familiar with the applications of inner ear gene therapy to treat hearing loss and dizziness
  • Understand the challenges of inner ear gene therapy

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 5 - For Adults Only: Applications for Assessment and Therapy

Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

Clinician and patient use of personal technology in the form of smartphones and tablets is expanding. This session explores the use of smartphone and tablet accessibility features and applications to increase our patients' communication, independence and safety, and to promote extra-clinical practice and skill generalization. Evolution of applications, free versus paid applications, application benefits and pitfalls, EBP and explore applications for swallowing, speech-language, AAC, cognition and voice will be discussed. SLPs knowledge of how applications work, who they can benefit and ways to incorporate them into therapy will be presented. In addition to SLP-specific applications, information on general applications to promote safety and independence will be provided, along with discussion about device accessibility features for low-vision, hearing and touch to increase patient acceptance.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three smartphone/tablet accessibility features that can be used to maximize a patient's cognitive-communication skills
  • Discuss five application and describe their use in-session and extra-clinically to target goals
  • Differentiate between strong and weak applications and explain three characteristics of strong applications
  • Explain two benefits of application use for therapy and skill generalization

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 6 - School Services Update

Elizabeth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District; Pat Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty Public Schools; Diane Golden, PhD, Past Policy Coordinator for Missouri Council of Administrators of Special Education; Karen Allan; Naomi Brunner, MS, CCC-SLP, Blue Springs R-IV School District

The purpose of this session is to inform the MSHA membership with respect to proposed and/or new standards and the impact on speech-language pathologists working in the school setting. The new eligibility criteria for language impairment and sound system disorder will be reviewed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the current language impairment and sound system disorder criterion
  • Describe the changes with the new language impairment and sound system disorder criterion
  • List changes with eligibility criterion regarding voice and fluency disorder

Level of Learning: Introductory

1:00 pm - 4:15 pm

3:15 pm - 4:15 pm

Session 8 - AAC and Aphasia: Bridging Communication and Life Participation

Amanda Hettenhausen, MAR, CCC-SLP, Saltillo Corporation

Communication intervention for a person with aphasia is challenging. It’s emotional and carries unique experiences for each person, requiring a customized approach to therapeutic goals. With the increased availability of both low-end and high-end technology to support communication, individuals with aphasia and their conversation partners (i.e., family, friends, health professionals, etc.) are interested in how augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) may benefit someone with aphasia. This session will review current best practices for AAC and aphasia, with a focus on the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia (LPAA). This approach places an emphasis on empowering the person with aphasia and their communication partners to re-engage in life post-stroke. Examples of AAC supports, features and intervention strategies will be shared. Case examples and therapy outcomes will be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia
  • Identify three examples of AAC supports that may benefit a person with aphasia
  • List two intervention strategies that may benefit a person with aphasia

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 9 - Stepping Stones to Blast Off

Jamie Klupe, MS, CCC-SLP, Special School District of St. Louis County

Working with students who have severe physical limitations and complex communication needs can be daunting for service providers. Many factors must be considered when making decisions regarding a student’s communication system including point(s) of access, cognitive ability and student motivation for communication. If these factors are not appropriately addressed, it could lead to feelings of frustration and failure on the part of the communicator as well as service provider. This presentation will highlight a single student with Cerebral Palsy who has had a successful transition from using switches to activate cause-effect toys to her use of two step scanning using the CoreScanner vocabulary file from Prentke Romich. CoreScanner is a vocabulary file that uses the Unity language system and is based on the Language Acquisition Through Motor Planning (LAMP) approach. This system provides the user the opportunity to learn how to scan and select using their speech generating device. Communicators begin by learning to scan to a single message and progress through seven levels, gradually increasing their access to more vocabulary. Participants will review CoreScanner, learn how an interdisciplinary team approach led to the determination of this vocabulary file choice, review videos and data regarding student progression through levels, implementation strategies used by the team and use of CoreScanner in the academic setting.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate the seven levels of the CoreScanner vocabulary files
  • Explain how CoreScanner uses motor planning with switches to facilitate language acquisition
  • Analyze implementation and generalization strategies
  • Describe the importance of a multi-disciplinary team approach in determining communication modes for students with complex needs

Level of Learning: Introductory

3:15 pm - 5:15 pm

Session 11 - Vestibular Dysfunction and Assessments in Patients With EVA and Superior Canal Dehiscence

PWade Chien, MD, FACS, Johns Hopkins School of Mediciney

In this session, we will discuss the clinical presentation of enlarged vestibular aqueduct and superior canal dehiscence. We will also discuss the assessment and treatment options for these patients.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the clinical presentation of patients with EVA and SCD
  • Discuss the clinical assessment of patients with EVA and SCD
  • Discuss the treatment options for patients with EVA and SCD

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 11 - What SLPs Need to Know About RTI and MTSS

Mindy Bridges, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas Medical Center

In the past two decades, educators and researchers have been interested in the use of educational frameworks that allow children to be identified as having reading disabilities if their response to appropriate, evidence-based instruction is substantially below those of their peers (e.g., Fuchs & Fuchs, 2006; Haager, Klinger, & Vaughn, 2007). In this presentation, information related to this framework of multi-tiered systems of support will be provided. The presenter will discuss research related to important aspects of this framework, including universal screening, progress monitoring, and appropriate levels of instruction and intervention. Although the discussion will be centered around those children at risk for reading disabilities, the concepts are applicable to other educational areas such as speech and language disorders and math.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss components of Response to Intervention/MTSS
  • Discuss issues to consider when choosing screening measures
  • Identify important factors to consider when planning intervention for struggling readers

Level of Learning: Intermediate

4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session 12 - Teaching Student Clinicians to Use Evidence-Based Practice for Preschool Vocabulary Instruction

Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP; Greta Hull, MS, CCC-SLP, from University of Missouri-Columbia; Abby Eubank, MS, CCC-SLP

The field of speech-language pathology emphasizes evidence-based practice (EBP) as the most appropriate approach for providing services in clinical settings. Despite a substantial evidence-base to guide the use of robust vocabulary instruction, it appears that there is limited implementation of EBP in vocabulary instruction in educational and clinical settings. In this presentation, we will share findings and implications for practice from a recent research project conducted to examine ways to teach EBP to undergraduate student clinicians. We will include an overview of EBP in explicit vocabulary instruction during shared storybook reading with preschool children using content developed as part of the project.

Participants were enrolled in a clinical practicum in a university-based speech and language preschool program and completed teaching modules that taught strategies for evidence-based vocabulary instruction during shared storybook reading with preschool children. During the semester-long practicum experience, participants were provided with brief teaching modules that taught strategies for evidence-based vocabulary instruction during shared storybook reading. Each week, participants completed short lesson plans and videotapes during shared storybook reading sessions with preschoolers. Half of the participants received brief, emailed performance feedback. After watching the modules, student clinicians were more likely to use evidence-based practices in their shared storybook sessions. For example, student clinicians chose more appropriate vocabulary words and used more child-friendly definitions. Participants who received emailed performance feedback indicated that the feedback was helpful in improving their use of EBP.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize key strategies in evidence based practice in vocabulary instruction
  • List challenges to implementation of evidence-based practice in clinical settings
  • Describe ways to design effective learning opportunities to increase use of EBP

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 13 - Surviving Supervision: Training in Paying it Forward

Melissa Passe, MA, CCC-SLP; Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP; Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A; Trish Hanson, MA, CCC-SLP, from Truman State University

As of January 1, 2020, every speech-language pathologist (SLP) who supervises a student or mentors a clinical fellow (CF) will need to have two hours of continuing education in supervision training. This presentation will offer introductory training in clinical supervision and will address the various supervisory needs of specific work settings. This presentation will be helpful to students as well as practicing professionals in the field as the presenters demystify the ins and outs of clinical supervision from both the student and supervisory perspective.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify important aspects of supervision as they relate to a school setting
  • Identify important aspects of supervision as they relate to a medical setting
  • Identify important aspects of clinical feedback
  • Differentiate between important aspects of supervision from a student's perspective and the supervisor's perspective

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 14 - What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Stronger

Cassie Gates, MS; Jennifer Fox, MEd, from Warrensburg R6

Therapy groups and classrooms, no matter the grade, size or subject, will require classroom management and behavior strategies. Many classroom teachers and speech-language pathologists feel the stress and may even feel inadequate when it comes to behaviors in their classroom. Being able to brainstorm different behavior strategies with practitioners in the field is a huge asset to having a successful classroom. We have taken numerous behavior strategies from our own classroom experiences and made them easy, quick and efficient so that any educator can implement them. It is our hope to lead an informal discussion of behavior strategies that educators can take back to their therapy rooms and schools the next day and see a decrease in negative behavior and an increase in positive behavior. We will allow professionals to ask, network and learn together in an informal format while providing our expertise on quick, easy and effective social, emotional and behavioral interventions. Student behavior in the therapy room, hallway, playground, cafeteria and classroom does not always seem to be what it used to be. Students themselves do not always seem to be the way they used to be. Whether it is an increase in students being identified with disabilities, an increase in student from lower socioeconomic status or an increase in students without social skills due to the technological world being such a focus with our youth, the behavior strategies discussed will be relevant to today’s students. We are passionate about teaching behaviors, not just assuming our student know how to act.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify relevant strategies for common behavior issues found in classrooms today
  • Distinguish why a behavior is occurring (the function) and be able to perform strategies in their therapy sessions, thus, increasing instructional time
  • Recall at least one of the discussed three-step strategies and perform that specific strategy to extinguish students’ negative behaviors while increasing students’ positive behaviors
  • Recall the information they have gained back to their school and share with colleagues/administrators/parents

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 15 - Brain Injury: Causes, Impact and Resources

Maureen Cunningham, CFRE, Brain Injury Association of Missouri; Charity Shelton, MS, CCC-SLP, CBIS, Mercy Neuro Outpatient Therapy Services

Brain injury can happen to anyone, anywhere and anytime. The results can include reduced cognitive functioning, limited mobility, vision, hearing or balance challenges and mental health disorders. Being aware of causes of acquired or traumatic brain injury, recognizing the signs of a potential undiagnosed brain injury and being familiar with community resources to complement speech-language pathology treatments are vital for best practice care for patients, clients and consumers impacted by brain injury.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify causes and types of brain injury
  • Discuss the impacts of brain injury for clients, patients and consumers
  • Make referrals to community based services to complement the care they provide for clients, patients and consumers

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 16 - Ethical Issues in Speech-Language Pathology

Klaire Brumbaugh, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Meghan Berti, MS, CCC-SLP, Therapy Lifetime Consultants, LLC; J. Gaylord, MA, CCC-SLP, Capital Region Medical Center

Speech-language pathologists face ethical issues, decisions and dilemmas on a daily basis. This educational session will describe ethical issues often faced in healthcare settings, school-based settings and in supervision of students and support personnel, as well as provide decision-making models to improve understanding and use of strategies to make ethical decisions. Examples of information that will be discussed are ethical considerations when adopting new assessments and ethical considerations during supervision practices. Analysis of the code of ethics put forth by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association will be used to support the ethical decision-making process.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Improve understanding of ASHA Code of Ethics
  • Explain ethical issues in speech-language pathology in various settings
  • Describe decision-making models to improve ethical decision-making

Level of Learning: Intermediate

5:30 pm - 6:30 pm Saturday

7:00 am - 8:00 am

8:00 am - 9:00 am

Session 19 - Finishing Strong: Clinical Fellowship Decision

Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

This program is designed for graduate students and focuses on the importance of making good professional decisions when choosing a clinical fellowship (CF) practice setting. A brief overview of potential practice settings, the importance of the CF-mentor relationship, how to find a job and common pitfalls to avoid will be explored. Understanding that the CF represents the final piece of a new clinician's education will be emphasized.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two potential CF practice settings
  • Identify three ways to find a CF position
  • Explain two elements of a successful CF-mentor relationship
  • Identify two positive and two negative signs when weighing a job offer

Level of Learning: Introductory

8:00 am - 10:00 am

Session 20 - Patterns of Development in Younger Siblings of Children With Autism

This session reviews patterns of development in younger siblings of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The recurrence risk for ASD in younger siblings of children with ASD is around 20% (Landa et al., 2007; Ozonoff et al., 2011). An additional 28% of younger siblings of children with ASD have been found to exhibit broader delays in development (but not ASD) (Ozonoff et al., 2014). These broader developmental delays were often detectable by first birthdays, using standard testing across motor, cognition, language, social and/or behavioral domains. Delays were commonly seen in social communication and interaction. Taken together, clinicians and families are motivated to closely monitor the overall development of high-risk infant siblings as well as implement appropriate early interventions as needed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the recurrence risk for autism in younger siblings of children with ASD
  • Describe patterns of developmental delay in younger siblings of children with ASD who do not have autism
  • Describe developmental surveillance needs of high-risk infant siblings

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 21 - Ensuring a Foundation for Communicative Competence: The Buck Stops Here!

Kimberly Gerth, MA, CCC-SLP, Rockwood School District; Cheryl Livingston, MS, CCC-SLP, Special School District of St. Louis County

Society associates independence with the ability to functionally communicate our needs and desires, to protest, to ask and answer questions, to advocate, to share information and to have social interactions. In our efforts to help students navigate their world, we often find they learn to take their cues from the adults in their lives and become prompt-dependent, rather than independent. Students with autism, multiple disabilities or other developmental delays may need structured, carefully-planned intervention and support from the special education team (including the family) in order to achieve communicative competence in a variety of settings and with a variety of communication partners. What is a speech-language pathologist to do with a young child who does not seem to want to interact with others, or with an older student who should already have these basic skills but does not? Where do speech-language pathologists even start? Are there prerequisite skills that a child must develop? What is the sequence to follow when teaching functional communication skills? How do you know what has been done with the child in the past, and how effective it was? What goals should be written? How is the student’s progress assessed? Looking at the big picture will help guide decision-making. Our session challenges participants to prioritize independent communicative competence at whatever age and stage the child is currently at. With a coordinated team approach, along with a conscious plan to avoid the creation or continuation of a prompt-dependent interaction pattern, the likelihood that the buck stops here increases dramatically.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role of the speech-language pathologist in collaborating with other members of the student’s team to create an environment which fosters independent communication skills
  • Identify the foundational skills that are necessary for a child to become an independent communicator with adults and peers in his environment
  • Describe the concept of basic self-advocacy and how it fosters communicative competence in students of any age
  • List at least two strategies for evaluating the current communication skills of a student, in order to see a big picture view of them and prioritize goals for intervention

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 22 - Instructional Techniques to Increase Early Literacy Skills in Young Students

Mindy Bridges, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas Medical Center

Early intervention with young children at risk for later having reading disabilities is critical to ensuring future academic success. Research over the past decades has provided much insight on the early skills that young children need in order to become good word readers and comprehenders (for a review, see Hogan, Bridges, Justice, and Cain, 2011). Such skills include letter-sound knowledge, phonological awareness, vocabulary and narrative language. In this presentation, a brief overview of these skills will be provided and then direct intervention techniques will be shared.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the importance of early identification for students at risk for later-reading disabilities
  • Name and briefly describe at least two skills that are related to later reading success
  • Apply intervention techniques to their own clinical practice

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 23 - Children With Hearing Loss and Diverse Needs

Christine Yoshinaga-Itano, PhD, CCC-A, University of Colorado Boulder

This session will present information about children who are deaf or hard of hearing from non-English speaking homes and those with additional disabilities. Forty-percent of children who are deaf or hard of hearing have identified additional disabilities, such as autism and cognitive disability. Early diagnoses of additional disabilities, such as autism, are critical to assuring optimal outcomes. Screening for autism and identifying risk behaviors in a child who also is deaf or hard of hearing is challenging but possible. Modifications of interventions typically effective for infants and/or children who are deaf or hard of hearing to be appropriate for autism or other disabilities, such as cognitive disorders or speech motor disorders need to occur as early as possible, to optimize effectiveness and require interdisciplinary collaborations. Additionally, a significant percentage of children who are deaf or hard of hearing are growing up in homes which are non-English speaking. These children may have Mandarin, Russian, German, Somali, Arabic, Farsi, Urdu, Tagalog, Cantonese or Spanish as the primary home language. The session will provide language outcome data on children in Spanish-speaking homes, and individual case studies of children in other language environments. Intervention strategies for infants and/or children who are deaf and hard of hearing and growing up in environments that are non-English speaking will be presented and will include information about determining whether their amplification (hearing aids and cochlear implants) has programs and maps that assure the ability to discriminate all phonemes of their home language.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify how to screen for autism in infants and/or children who are deaf or hard of hearing
  • Describe predictors of language outcomes of children who are deaf or hard of hearing in Spanish-speaking homes
  • Describe modifications of intervention strategies for infants and/or children who are deaf or hard of hearing to accommodate for learning spoken languages other than English
  • Describe modifications to typical interventions for children who are deaf or hard of hearing for children with autism

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:00 am - 11:00 am

Session 24 - Evaluating and Treating Adolescents and Adults Who Stutter

J. Scott Yaruss, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Michigan State University

This session will help speech-language pathologists provide comprehensive treatment for adolescents and adults who stutter. The session will begin with a brief review of a framework for understanding the disorder from the perspective of the speaker and suggest meaningful, practical strategies for helping speakers overcome the burden of stuttering. Strategies will address surface stuttering behaviors, negative reactions by the speaker and those in his/her environment, functional communication difficulties and the negative impact of stuttering on the speaker’s overall quality of life.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the factors that might bring adolescents and adults who stutter to treatment
  • Describe the entirety of the stuttering disorder based on the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)
  • Explain how treatment can address all of the components of stuttering identified in the ICF
  • Develop a comprehensive treatment plan for adolescents and adults who stutter

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 25 - Join the Revolution: Individuals With Aphasia Using AAC

Julie Hanson Gatts, MA, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

This first part of this presentation will provide a brief overview of the basic components that need to be considered when fitting an individual with an acquired disorder with an Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Device and/or Speech Generating Device (SGD). Several high-tech systems that are available and fit the needs of adults with acquired disorders will be presented. Discussion of various page sets and layouts within each will occur. Low-tech systems will be discussed very briefly and in the context of fitting individuals with something that provides them with a voice. Individualization of a page set within a system will be discussed as an important component to fitting and supporting for long term use of a system. Funding issues and resources will be presented. The second part of the presentation will focus on strategies for individualizing user layout, teaching effective use of the device and communication partner training as components to successful long-term use of an AAC/SGD. Evidence and resources related to use of AAC/SGD systems by adults who have aphasia will be shared. The importance of incorporating AAC/SGD at all stages of recovery for individuals with aphasia who need augmentation with communication will be emphasized. Funding issues and sustainability of intervention and use will be discussed as this can be a barrier for professionals and consumers.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three different user layouts on a high tech AAC/SGD that would be appropriate for an individual with an acquired disorder
  • Identify two guiding factors when individualizing a page set for an individual with an acquired disorder
  • Identify three different strategies to use when teaching an adult with acquired disorders how to effectively use their communication system
  • Describe at least three components of communication partner training and the rationale for it

Level of Learning: Intermediate

9:00 am - 11:30 pm

Session 26 - NSSLHA Share Session

Ashley Grohmann, University of Central Missouri; Kim Stewart, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Kaitlyn Fessler; Michelle Vomund, MEd, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

The NSSLHA Share Session will comprise of NSSLHA members and advisors from eight universities in Missouri. The members will share their chapter’s successes and ideas, as well as gain information from other chapters to improve their NSSLHA meetings, membership, philanthropic events and participation with National NSSLHA.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association chapter organizations
  • Explain ideas related to dues, philanthropic events, and professional advocacy
  • Improve NSSLHA Executive Board meetings to improve overall organization of the chapter
  • Describe the benefits with membership of National NSSLHA

Level of Learning: Introductory

9:15 am - 10:15 pm

Session 27 - Speech-Language Pathology Assistants in Missouri: Current Requirements and Use

Katherine Ermgodts, MA, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

In the state of Missouri, speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs) are defined as trained professionals who work under the supervision of licensed speech-language pathologists, helping children and adults improve communication skills. (Missouri Board of Healing Arts [BHA]). In Missouri, SLPAs may conduct screenings, implement treatment plans, document progress and assist the speech-language pathologist in assessment and treatment. Under state guidelines, SLPAs are not permitted to diagnosis communication or swallowing disorders, make eligibility determinations, conduct or interpret assessments or create or modify treatment plans. The Missouri Board of Registration for the Healing Arts (BHA) Advisory Commission is responsible for regulating SLPAs in the state. Missouri established state licensure for assistants in 2013. Recent research in the use, training and employment of SLPAs and their supervisors has revealed several themes related to assistants and their impact on the field. Some recent data indicates a potential need for education and training for SLPAs and supervising speech-language pathologists. The purpose of this session is to explore the current use, regulation, education and employment settings of speech-language pathology assistants in Missouri. Scope of practice and roles and responsibilities for SLPAs will be discussed. ASHA’s recommended scope of practice for SLPAs will also be reviewed and incorporated. Guidelines for supervising speech-language pathologists will be presented as part of this session.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the state licensing requirements for speech-language pathology assistants
  • Identify the requirements to supervise a speech-language pathology assistant
  • Differentiate the role and scope of practice of a speech-language pathologist and a speech-language pathology assistant

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:00 am - 11:00 am

Session 28 - Fostering Early Social Communication Skills Through Partner Games

Kimberly Gerth, MA, CCC-SLP, Rockwood School District

SLPs who work with young children with autism and other significant communication needs are always looking for ways to help students make connections with their peers, as well as ways that their peers can connect with them. These children often have a difficult time developing pretend play skills and may not interact with peers during classroom activities because they do not have basic turn-taking, sharing or language skills. Partner Games were developed in an attempt to bridge that gap and thereby give all children a common ground for interacting successfully. Independent participation in Partner Games may involve actions such as cooperative building, giving/receiving items, passing items and/or trading items. Early nonverbal communication skills are targeted: joint attention, anticipation and visually orienting to a peer. All games are relatively short to play and have a definite beginning and end, which helps children with predictability. Children participate in games with a peer partner and work together towards a common goal. Partners give each other a high-five at the conclusion of each activity, to celebrate a game well-played together. Based on preliminary results of Partner Games implementation, it is expected that students who participate will demonstrate increased joint attention, improved visual attention to peer models, higher levels of engagement with peers during center time, increased task persistence during play activities and greater awareness of peers as possible play partners. Children will also develop a foundation for social interaction that can then be expanded into verbal turn-taking and conversational skills.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the early foundational skills that are necessary to develop reciprocal communication interactions with peers
  • List the benefits and risks of providing different types of cues and prompts to young students with autism and related developmental delays
  • Identify ways that the use of Partner Games can lead to improved social language skills with peers

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 29 - Language Intervention in Multi-Tier System of Supports

Elizabeth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District; Patricia Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty School District; Dawn Callahan Dennis, EdD, CCC-SLP, EBS Healthcare

This panel of speech-language pathologists will present an overview of how language interventions can be utilized within a Multi-Tier System of Supports (MTSS) as an effective approach to improve educational outcomes for children. The panel will discuss collaboration of resources and strategies, opportunities for intervention and suggests for collection of progress monitoring data.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand how language interventions fit into multi-tier system of supports
  • Describe a variety of approaches to provide support for students in the areas of language strategies, intervention and data collection

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Sesion 30 - SBest Treatment for Phonological Disorder

Julie Hoffmann, MA, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

Come review best treatment methods for working with children with phonological disorder. Phonological Disorder has been well-researched and several approaches have proven to be very successful in remediation of this disorder. Learn how to expedite progress and increase speech intelligibility by making important therapy decisions related to therapy targets and approaches. Most current research will be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain current research on remediation of phonological disorder in children
  • Describe how to individualize choosing most appropriate sound targets and approaches for a children with phonological disorder
  • Demonstrate understanding of several phonological disorder therapy approaches based on EBP

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 31 - Traumatic Brain Injury in a Prison Population

Addison Pittman, BS; Paige Wilson, BS; Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Rockhurst University

This research examined traumatic brain injury (TBI) in incarcerated individuals and knowledge of individuals working with this population. This study employed a survey design to assess knowledge of brain injury in faculty providing courses and services to an area women’s prison. Additionally, focus groups were conducted with survey participants. Participants were presented with a fictitious case of an incarcerated individual with TBI. Participants were asked to discuss the case as well as provide opinions, perceptions and ideas on working with this individual. This study was conducted to add to the literature on working with individuals who are incarcerated with TBI.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • define traumatic brain injury and explain the signs and symptoms of such
  • Identify why there is a high rate of prevalence of TBI in a prison population and explain the importance of incarceration assessment and care availability
  • Discuss the influence of TBI on incarcerated individuals and understand other people’s opinions on the topic

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 32 - Issues in Licensure and Certification

Brenda Martien, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

This session will provide information regarding licensure and certification for SLPs and audiologists in Missouri. It will include recent changes due to legislative and regulatory actions and will allow participants to ask questions to assist in complying with Professional Registration and Department of Elementary and Secondary Education requirements. Some common issues that applicants for licensure or renewal of licensure will be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss requirements for licensure in the state of Missouri
  • List three changes in licensure and/or certification as an SLP, audiologist or SLP-assistant over the last three years
  • List four reasons licensure as an SLP or audiologist in Missouri may be denied licensure

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 33 - Thinking About a PhD

Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP; Stacy Wagovich, PhD, CCC-SLP, from University of Missouri-Columbia

This presentation will provide an overview of the process involved in obtaining a PhD in our discipline. Topics will include how to select a focus of study and a mentor, the typical timeline for completion of the degree, opportunities for funding and a general sense of what being a doctoral student is like. If you ae thinking you may be interested in a career in academia, now or in the future, this is the session for you!

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Outline the typical sequence of steps in completing a research doctorate
  • Consider the pros and cons of doctoral study and a research career
  • Describe experiences and funding opportunities available for doctoral students in our field

Level of Learning: Introductore

Session 34 - Dysphagia Evaluations: The Evolution of the Gold Standard

Mallory Moore, SLPD, CCC-SLP, CoxHealth

One of the greatest questions amongst speech-language pathologists providing services for individuals with dysphagia is finding the gold standard for assessing dysphagia. This presentation will explore the evolution of dysphagia evaluations, evidence supporting those evaluations and the latest research for instrumental swallowing assessments. New research findings specific to individuals with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis & Parkinson’s disease, via completion of simultaneous instrumental assessments, will be discussed. These findings will challenge the definition of what speech-language pathologists consider the gold standard in evaluation for those with dysphagia while encouraging speech-language pathologists to critically analyze the needs of their patients.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of the clinical swallow evaluation
  • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of instrumental assessments of swallow, specifically the modified barium swallow study and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallow
  • Explain new research findings that influence the gold standard of dysphagia evaluations

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 35 - Hidden Hearing Loss: Differential Diagnosis, Diagnosis and Clinical Cases

Wafaa Kaf, MD, PhD, C-AAA, FAAA, Missouri State University

Several adults with normal hearing sensitivity often complain of difficulty hearing with background noise. Comprehensive audiological evaluation should be performed to determine and distinguish between different pathologies that cause difficulty of speech perception in the presence of normal hearing. Is it an auditory processing disorder, an auditory neuropathy disorder or a hidden hearing loss? This presentation will highlight possible mechanisms of hidden hearing loss and test battery used to document presence of hidden hearing loss.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe clinical manifestations of hidden hearing loss
  • Explain hidden hearing loss and its mechanism
  • Discuss audiological evaluation specific to hidden hearing loss
  • Identify signs of hidden hearing loss from the case presentation

Level of Learning: Intermediate

12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

President's Celebration - Rediscovering My Identity

John Kindschuh, JD, BA

I will discuss how my September 2013 cerebellar stroke initially stole my ability to talk and walk. Through many hours of therapy, I began relearning my faculties, especially how to speak again. For example, in my initial speech therapy (ST), I accomplished the following tasks, practiced minimal pairs with a mirror, watched how my lips and tongue formed differently for words such as bat, bet and bit, stated simple sentences, said multi-syllabic words, emphasizing the appropriate syllable in the word we were practicing, used a metronome to ensure my speech aligns with the beat, read poetry for inflection and built-in rhythm and other things. At Maryville University, I am asked to do more advanced things in speech, including the following breath support, volume control, pitch, use compound sentences, read passages approximately two pages in length, whisper, use smaller lip movements and avoid saying a final sound on words that end in -d, -w, -n or -ing. Of all the therapies, I will discuss how ST was the most difficult for me. You would think physical therapy (PT) would be the most draining because of the sheer physical exertion. Though I was tired after PT, I was barely able to talk after ST. My mouth was exhausted! I had to think about many different things that go into speech during the entire session. Every speech therapist would affirm that I worked very hard!

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify how many components go into relearning speech
  • Reinforce that speech therapists help people's lives
  • Encourage clients/patients to work extremely hard

Level of Learning: Advanced

2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Session 36 - A Framework to Enhance Social-Communicative Competence for Individuals With ASD

Colleen O’Leary Card, MS, CCC-SLP, BCBA, Special School District of St. Louis County

This session will provide an overview of the core social-communication deficits of individuals across the autism spectrum, and an overview of The SCERTS Model ®, a comprehensive, multidisciplinary educational framework designed to support children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The SCERTS Model® is a lifespan framework that can be used to support individuals of all ages and developmental abilities to expand their social and communicative competence. An additional session will provide participants an opportunity to develop an action plan utilizing the principles of The SCERTS Model® to address core developmental challenges faced by children with ASD.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify core challenges in social-communication faced by children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) at different stages of development
  • Identify core challenges in emotional regulation faced by children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) at different stages of development
  • Identify essential components of a comprehensive intervention program for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) based on core social-communication deficits and incorporating evidence-based practices

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 37 - How to Finally Clean Up That Pesky Lisp!

Julie Hoffmann, MA, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis Universitys

Both frontal and lateral lisps are often very difficult to treat, even when the SLP has been practicing for a number of years. Specific oral-motor and speech-production issues associated with lisps will be fully explained as related to strident sound productions. Come learn or re-learn a number of beneficial therapy methods to remediate the persistent frontal, lateral or mixed lisp.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe specific oral-motor and speech production issues that cause lisps
  • Identify several effective therapy approaches to remediate lisps based on issues causing each client's lisp
  • Explain facilitation methods for strident sounds s, z, sh, ch, and j

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 38 - Language Outcomes and Predictors of Children With Hearing Loss

Christine Yoshinaga-Itano, PhD, CCC-A, University of Colorado Boulder

This presentation will present longitudinal outcomes of children with hearing loss at seven years of age. Predictors that include both uncontrollable variables (cognitive ability, degree of hearing loss, mother's level of education) as well as controllable variables surpassing EHDI (Early Hearing Detection and Intervention) 1-3-6 guidelines, parent talk and language outcomes at 36 months when transitioning from parent-infant to Part B services. Information will also be provided about predictors of language outcome from over 400 participants from twelve states in a large cross-sectional study. Predictors of the population of children, as well as subgroups such as children with both bilateral and unilateral hearing loss and children with hearing aids and those with cochlear implants, will be discussed. Implications of these research findings on intervention strategies will be presented, including the use of LENA technology for progress monitoring of parent language strategies and characteristics of the acoustics of the daily language environment. Examples of how this technology has impacted individual case studies of children with diverse needs will be discussed. The use of this technology with children who do not speak English in the home (e.g., Mandarin, Russian, German, Spanish, Arabic), as well as children with and without additional disabilities, will be discussed. The technology has been useful screening for additional disabilities such as autism and speech disorders not attributable to hearing loss.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify both uncontrollable and controllable variables that predict language outcomes in children who are deaf or hard of hearing
  • Identify intervention strategies and progress monitoring strategies that can to monitor the variable of parent language
  • Identify strategies for screening for additional disorders in children who are deaf or hard of hearing that can impact speech and language development

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm 2:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session 40 - Early Childhood Stuttering Therapy: A Practical Approach

J. Scott Yaruss, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Michigan State University

Stuttering in preschool and young school-aged children can be one of the more challenging disorders for speech-language pathologists to treat. Many clinicians have wondered about which children need treatment and what are the most effective ways to help children overcome their difficulties with speech fluency. This session is designed to help clinicians answer these and other difficult questions so they will be able to provide effective treatment young children who stutter. The session will begin with an overview of key concepts in stuttering therapy, including specific techniques for helping young children who stutter improve their speech fluency and overall communication. The presenter will provide specific examples of treatment goals, strategies and therapy activities that can be adapted for a variety of settings. Particular attention will be paid to strategies for working with parents, including sample dialogues so participants will understand how to answer the questions parents often ask. Participants will have the opportunity to ask about specific children on their caseloads so they will leave from the session with a better understanding of the nature of stuttering and increased confidence in their ability to help young children who stutter and their families overcome the burden of this challenging disorder.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Develop individualized treatment approaches aimed at helping preschool children overcome their speaking difficulties
  • Effectively educate parents about three strategies for facilitating preschool children’s fluency at home and in other situations
  • Apply three strategies for helping preschool children improve their speech fluency directly
  • Describe two strategies for helping preschool children develop healthy, appropriate attitudes toward stuttering and their speaking abilities

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 41 - Aphasia Couples Therapy - Part 1

Larry Boles, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of the Pacific

This two-part session will cover Aphasia Couples Therapy (ACT) as follows. Part 1 will address the historical context. Although some may see this as a fringe method for delivering therapy, there is a 20-year history for social approaches that will reassure SLPs that others have blazed the trail. After this review, more specific information will be shared in Part 2 that documents ACT and some particular techniques within ACT that are beneficial to our patients. Evidence for the efficacy of ACT will be shared.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three studies that provide efficacy evidence for ACT
  • Identify three studies that provide efficacy evidence for social approaches to treatment of aphasia
  • List three goals that are objective, measurable, and reimbursable

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 42 - Why, What and How: Executive Function Intervention in Acquired Disorders

Julie Hanson Gatts, MA, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

This talk will present the WHY: A review of the evidence available related to intervention in executive function and associated disorders for individuals with acquired disorders; the WHAT: Discuss and brainstorm creating specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timely (SMART) goals for individuals with executive function and associated disorders; and the HOW: Present and discuss techniques and strategies for increasing independence in daily life through executive function and association disorders intervention.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Express increased confidence with being able to develop SMART goals related to executive function
  • Identify two new strategies to implement in intervention that will assist with improving executive function and related disorders

Level of Learning: Intermediate

4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

Session 43 - Evidence-Based Literacy Practices in Schools: What SLPs Need to Succeed

Mindy Bridges, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas Medical Center; Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri-Columbia; Jessica Smith, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

In this session, we will lead a discussion on the role of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in assessment and intervention in literacy. The ASHA guidelines (2000) are very clear that an SLP is part of the team of individuals involved in assessing and intervening in children with reading disabilities. The guidelines explain that SLPs have specific knowledge and expertise related to reading and writing and therefore SLPs should play a critical and direct role in the development of literacy for children and adolescents with communication disorders. It is imperative that we, as a field, understand the complexity of reading development and disorders in order to implement evidence-based practice (EBP) related to literacy. However, many SLPs may not have completed coursework nor had clinical experiences to prepare them for this responsibility. In fact, when reviewing course content related to top SLP programs in the country, only two programs included a specific course dedicated to reading and/or writing development and disorders. We will present results of a survey of school-based SLPs to explore knowledge of literacy as well as the challenges to implementation of EBP.

We will focus on three key questions: What knowledge do SLPs need to implement EBP in literacy in school settings? What skills do SLPs need to implement EBP in literacy in school settings? What supports do SLPs need to implement EBP in literacy in school settings? For each question, an example case will illustrate potential challenges facing SLPs, present relevant survey results and identify and discuss related resources.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the knowledge, skills and supports needed for SLPs to implement EBP in assessing and treating literacy development and disorders in school settings
  • List potential barriers to implementation of EBP related to literacy in school settings
  • Identify potential resources to support the use of EBP in literacy by SLPs in school settings

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 44 - Side Effects May Include Headaches, Nausea and … Fluency?

Matt Krause, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, University of Missouri-Columbia

There is no FDA approved medication for stuttering ... yet. However, there are and have been drugs in clinical trials exclusively for the treatment of stuttering. This session will review the historical and current research for the medical treatment of stuttering, discuss how this research relates to current understanding of potential causal mechanisms for stuttering and what SLPs should know to assist future clients who stutter.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Distinguish between previous and currently studied medications for stuttering and their respective chemical mechanisms
  • Differentiate between historical and modern causal theories for stuttering
  • Distinguish between the roles of physicians and SLPs in the medication prescription process
  • Differentiate between FDA approved uses for medications and off-label uses

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 45 - Interesting Audiology Cases: Bridging the Gap Between Audiologists and Speech Pathologists

Whitney Hayden, AuD, CCC-A; Jennifer Baird, MA, CCC-A, from Cox Health Hospital; Wafaa Kaf, MD, PhD, C-AAA, FAAA, Missouri State University

A series of interesting cases will be presented demonstrating the vast adult audiology patient profile and how bridging the interdisciplinary gap between audiologists and speech-language pathologists can provide the best care for patients who have strokes, ear cancer and other diagnoses. Also, some interesting rare, pediatric audiology cases and the role of the audiologist throughout the child’s development will be presented.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the variety of audiology cases with speech-language pathology-related issues
  • Discuss the importance of audiologists and speech-language pathologists working together to provide the best care for patients
  • Compare and contrast our individual roles while serving our clients

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Sunday

7:15 am - 8:15 am

8:15 am - 10:15 am

Session 47 - Co-Teaching for AAC Therapy and Implications for Broader Application

Annie Filla, MA, CCC-SLP, Special School District

Multiple barriers to providing effective Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) therapy exist in the school setting. Some of these include management of negative behaviors, inadequate training of communication partners, learned helplessness and limited early success in functional communication. This presentation seeks to remediate some barriers to providing AAC therapy by outlining a program for applying co-teaching principles to therapy in the school and clinic setting. Over two years of implementing a co-teaching model for AAC therapy, student outcomes included decreased learned helplessness from over-prompting, increased carryover of skills to other settings and increased use of communication for a variety of functions. SLP outcomes included more accurate data collection, fewer missed therapy sessions and increased collaboration with teachers and support staff. Participants will learn principles of co-teaching as they relate to the field of speech-language pathology, as well as the broader application of co-teaching to training other school/clinic professionals and family members. Implementation ideas and resources, possible client goals and meaningful data collection ideas will also be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the six approaches to co-teaching and discuss the application of these approaches to speech/language therapy
  • Discuss two benefits and barriers to using co-teaching methods for AAC therapy
  • Describe the prompting hierarchy and its use in therapy for AAC users
  • Provide an example of how co-teaching principles can be applied when training other professionals and communication partners

Level of Learning: Introductory

8:30 am - 9:30am

Session 48 - Tell Me a Story: Using Narratives for Assessment and Intervention

Laura Crites, MA, CCC-SLP, Special School District of St. Louis County

Narrative skills require well-developed language in all areas. Acquiring skills for story retelling increases a child’s ability to understand texts and events in their daily experience. Good narratives support writing and verbally expressing stories and experiences. Skills for retelling are acquired through models, explicit teaching and a framework for retelling. These skills develop as the child’s language understanding, vocabulary and cognition grow. Pragmatic language includes retelling comprehensible stories and events in a sequenced fashion, while considering listener perspective. Deficits in narrative language skills, especially after teaching, may indicate the need for further assessment. Working on narrative skills is a productive method for addressing language in an RtI model. This session provides a literature review, basic overview of narrative components, methods for obtaining a narrative sample, systems used to evaluate narratives and a model to teach narrative skills.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the key components of narratives for the purpose of assessment and identification of students who may benefit from RtI instruction targeting story retelling
  • Use narratives in therapy to improve targeted language skill
  • Locate and use a variety of tools to assess a narrative sample as part of a language sample and for progress monitoring purposes

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:30 am - 10:30am

Session 49 - Enhancing Social Communication: Hands-On Practice and Application

Colleen O’Leary Card, MS, CCC-SLP, BCBA, Special School District of St. Louis County

This session will provide an overview of the core social-communication deficits of individuals across the autism spectrum, and an overview of The SCERTS Model®, a comprehensive, multidisciplinary educational framework designed to support children with ASD. The SCERTS Model® is a lifespan framework that can be used to support individuals of all ages and developmental abilities to expand their social and communicative competence.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the core social-communication deficits of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) across different stages of development
  • Prioritize learning objectives based on core social communication and emotion regulation challenges of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
  • Utilize the SCERTS framework to develop a meaningful intervention plan for an individual with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 50 - Assessing Auditory Processing in Children: Appropriate Evaluations and Interpretation

Jay Lucker, EdD, CCC-A/SLP, FAAA, Howard University

Audiologists are asked to evaluate children for auditory processing disorders all the time. Most audiologists learn to use what is called a pass/fail approach in which the child is given tests and if the child passes all tests the child is not diagnosed with an auditory processing disorder. If the child fails usually two measures at -2 standard deviations or only one measure at -3 standard deviations, the child is identified as having an auditory processing disorder. This is the method supported by AAA, ASHA, EAA and others. Then, once the child is diagnosed with APD, a common list of accommodations and possible treatments are recommended by the audiologist, which can be called same size fits all. This presentation focuses on what auditory processing disorders are really all about focusing on a multisensory processing approach. From this approach the specific/different types of auditory processing disorders are described with the methods for evaluation each specific area or type of auditory processing disorder. The end result is to identify that a child has a very specific type of auditory processing disorder. The specific sensory systems that contribute to each type of disorder are discussed along with specific recommendations for accommodations and general recommendations for treatment based on each specific type.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the various types of auditory processing disorders using a multisystem approach
  • Identify the different systems involved in processing for each type of auditory processing disorder
  • Identify appropriate accommodations for each specific type of auditory processing disorder
  • Identify possible referrals that are needed when a child with an auditory processing disorder has problems involving different systems other than only the auditory system

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:30 am - 11:30 am

Session 51 - Aphasia Couples Therapy - Part 2

Larry Boles, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of the Pacific

This two-part session will cover Aphasia Couples Therapy (ACT) as follows. Part 2 will cover the ways in which the speech-language pathologist can use ACT in his/her practice. Audience participation will be encouraged and measurable objectives will be encouraged.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List three goals that are objective, measurable and reimbursable
  • Identify two traits that ideal candidates for ACT would have
  • Identify two exclusionary traits for people for whom ACT would be inappropriate

Level of Learning: Intermediate

9:45 am - 10:45 am

Session 52 - MATerials (Make And Take): Let's Get Hands-On With Professional Development!

Jeanna Antrim, MS, CCC-SLP; Maggie Judson, MS, CCC-SLP, from Belleville Area Special Services Cooperative (BASSC)

Come MAT with us! MATerial trainings (make and take) was a program developed by the presenters during the 2017-2018 school year to encourage increased AAC strategy, visual support, literacy and assistive technology use in the classroom. Teachers and related service personnel participated in trainings that provided evidence-based strategies to increase student's learning in the classroom setting. Participants experienced hands-on time with making materials that related to the information provided during the training. Pre- and post-surveys were provided to both obtain information regarding the comfort level and frequency with using visual supports, adapted reading materials, core communication boards and assistive technology in the classroom, as well as to gain feedback from the participants about the program. The participants reported an overall increase in familiarity and comfort with visual supports and adapted reading materials. MATerial Trainings were well received and will continue next year as a result. We want to share with you how we got this program off the ground, the topics we covered, the format we used and the lessons we learned. Participants of this training will have the opportunity to experience a shortened MAT training and walk away with an adapted book that they assemble and adapt. Please join us so you can MAT!

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss three ways to implement hands-on professional development training in various settings
  • Describe two benefits of participating in a hands-on professional development opportunity
  • Identify three strategies of an effective design and implementation of professional development

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 53 -Metacognitive Strategies to Improve Social Communication

Megan Reynolds, MA, CCC-SLP, Speech Language Learning Systems, Inc.

Students with social communication deficits often lack executive functioning and metacognitive skills. Self-awareness, self-monitoring and self-regulation are critical when learning and interacting socially. For students to become effective communicators and generalize pragmatic language skills, they must be able to recognize when and how to use those skills. Instruction in metacognitive strategies helps students become more self-aware and monitor themselves. This strategy-based presentation will provide an overview of metacognition and describe tools to support students’ active engagement in the social learning process during individual and group therapy.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe key components of metacognition
  • Identify executive function challenges in individuals with social communication deficits
  • List metacognitive strategies used to internalize social learning
  • Implement visually based, engaging metacognitive techniques

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:45 am - 11:45 am

Session 54 - School-Based Enterprises: Here You Go, Have a Nice Day!

Laurel Duever-Collins, MA, CCC-SLP; Christy Segress, BS, from Columbia Public Schools

Have you ever wondered if it is possible to have a school-based enterprise that is run by students with moderate to severe Autism and other disabilities? How about using this model to measure behavior, adaptive behavior, language, social, vocational, math and reading goals? What about having this program run by upper elementary, middle schoolers and high schoolers? It is possible! Come hear about how we started a coffee business at a middle school that has expanded into two other buildings and gives our students real-life experiences with work and adaptive skills that are difficult to teach in a classroom setting. We will discuss the process of setting up a coffee shop, how we maintain our products and cash-flow and what goals we measure and how we measure them. We will also give examples of growth we have seen in students who have worked in the coffee shop the last four years.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Start a school-based enterprise with students with moderate-severe disabilities
  • Measure student progress on a variety of goals during a school-based enterprise
  • Differentiate and assess ability levels of students to have a group that would allow a school-based enterprise to be successful

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 55 - No I.E.P. Required: Let's T.A.L.K.

Melissa Finneseth, MS, CCC-SLP; Kerry Boehm, from Lee's Summit R-7 School District

If you are looking for a proven and innovative way to address speech and language concerns without a lengthy evaluation and SPED diagnosis, this presentation is for you! Join Melissa Finneseth, speech-language pathologist and Kerry Boehm, principal, as they share the multi-tiered approach developed by Lee's Summit Parents as Teachers. Parent Educator training, parent/child communication consultations, home speech and language programs, T.A.L.K. groups and speech improvement services have been making an impact in the area of communication for over 15 years in the Lee's Summit community. Consider implementing these responses to intervention strategies in your school district, as well!

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List the multi-tiered approach to communication concerns being utilized in the Lee's Summit community and school district
  • Assess the similarities and differences between I.E.P.s and T.A.L.K. groups/speech improvement services
  • Understand the sources that may be available to fund a similar program in their school district

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:45 am - 12:45 pm

Session 56 - Appropriate Evidence-Based Treatments for Children With Auditory Processing Disorders

Jay Lucker, EdD, CCC-A/SLP, FAAA, Howard University

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are asked to treat children identified with an auditory processing disorder all the time. However, what is often a problem is that SLPs do not get sufficient information regarding what specific type of auditory processing disorder exists. They may be told the child failed this or that test, but not what specifically is deficient and how these deficiencies are affecting the child leading to the SLP being unable to treat each specific factor involved in the type(s) of auditory processing disorder(s) present. This presentation focuses on what auditory processing disorders are really all about focusing on a multisensory-processing approach. From this approach the specific and different types of auditory processing disorders are described, identifying the specific behavior and learning problems that are caused by each specific type of auditory processing disorder. After identifying each specific type, specific accommodations and mostly treatments will be described and demonstrated with audience participation so that each treatment is better understood. The focus of these discussions are on what goals are needed, as well as what activities and programs might be appropriate for use with children with different types of auditory processing disorders. Sample cases will be presented with discussion with the whole group about cases they might want discussed as examples.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the various types of auditory processing disorders using a multisystem approach
  • Identify the different systems involved in processing for each type of auditory processing disorder
  • Identify appropriate accommodations and treatment the SLP should recommend for children with different types of auditory processing disorders
  • Demonstrate various treatment strategies and activities to help children with specific auditory processing disorders

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Session 57 - How to Motivate Practice Beyond Therapy: A Hands-On Workshop

Rebecca Frisella, MS, CCC-SLP; Angela Adrian, MA, CCC-SLP, from Saint Louis University

Discouraged when you prepare materials for caregivers to practice in the natural environment and there is little to no follow through? Although research has proven that home practice accelerates progress, we have often experienced lack of carryover at home. This session is an interactive opportunity to create and apply simple, affordable and effective activities for home practice. First, we will discuss how to motivate caregivers to practice with their preschoolers. We will provide examples of various home programs that have been successful for preschool children with speech and language delays. Next, we will discuss specific cases and the different types of home programs implemented. We will then divide into small groups assigned with different case studies. Each group will develop their own home practice activities and present ideas and rationales to the entire group.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify specific techniques to promote carryover of language literacy and speech skills in the natural environment
  • Create individualized home programs that are easy, affordable and effective
  • Integrate information and discuss its application within the context of a case study

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Session 58 - Reflux Dysphagia, Polypharmacy and the Repeat Hospitalization Link

Jeanna Winchester, PhD, SLP-A; Carol Winchester, MS, CCC-SLP, from Dysphagia Management Systems, LLC

The consequences of dysphagia can be severe dehydration, malnutrition, aspiration, choking, pneumonia and death. This presentation will discuss the risks of dysphagia in patients utilizing more than two medications at one time that can cause gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Polypharmacy-related risks to reflux dysphagia and the increased risk of repeat hospital admissions will be discussed. Repeat hospital admissions correlate with a breakdown of the Five Systems of Dysphagia. They are frequent, costly, preventable and deleterious. The functional management of the Five Systems of Dysphagia is critical to reducing the likelihood for repeat hospital admissions through the management of risk.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List the risk factors for reflux dysphagia
  • Document dysphagia risks in patients taking medications for pain management and/or neuropsychiatric disturbances
  • Document the symptoms of dysphagia for each of the five individual systems
  • Demonstrate the possible strategies for managing dysphagia risk in patients taking two or more GI and/or reflux medications concurrently

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:45 am - 12:45 pm

Session 59 - Empowering SLPs: Hearing Screening, Amplification and Auditory Training

Maureen Fischer, MS, CCC-A; Saneta Thurmon, MA, CCC-SLP/A, from Saint Louis University

The number of students who are deaf or hard of hearing in the mainstream school population is increasing due to new technologies and more effective interventions. Recommended tools for hearing screening are changing. SLPs in the school setting are the go to clinicians for dealing with issues related to hearing and hearing loss. At this time, registered SLPs in Missouri outnumber AUDs about 10 to 1. Many schools have access to an SLP, but not an AUD. This sets up unique challenges for the SLP who may not have had training or experience in dealing with issues related to hearing and hearing loss. The purpose of this presentation is to inform SLPs who may feel they lack knowledge in dealing with issues related to hearing and hearing loss. Particularly, we will discuss a new method of hearing screening now recommended by ASHA for use in the six month-preschool population. We will discuss the best ways to find resources related to hearing aid and cochlear implant troubleshooting, as well as basic device troubleshooting. Finally, we will discuss incorporating AR goals into your student’s IEP. Armed with this information, it is our hope the SLP will feel more comfortable filling their important and necessary role as the go to clinician on all things hearing.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe appropriate hearing screening tools, per ASHA recommendations, for pediatric patients
  • Identify a few reliable resources for information on basic methods of hearing aid and CI troubleshooting
  • Formulate appropriate auditory training goals for IEPs from case studies presented in the course

Level of Learning: Intermediate

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Session 59 - The What, Why and How of Evidence-Based Practice

Lisa Goran, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri; Janet Gooch, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University /p>

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is essential for optimal service provision. This session provides a history and overview of EBP in the medical and educational fields. We will discuss the definitions of EBP used by SLPs and educator preparation programs and methods for the implementation of EBPs in the clinic and classroom. Common barriers and concerns about the use of EBPs will be discussed and practical resources will be shared. Participant outcomes include a working definition of EBPs and resources for implementation.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the similarities and differences in the definitions of Evidence-Based Practice used by SLPs and educators
  • Identify at least three common barriers/concerns related to using EBPs
  • Identify at least three practical evidence-based resources for educators and SLPs

Level of Learning: Intermediate

 
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