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2017 Covention

MSHA Convention Program

Thursday Sessions
Friday Sessions
Saturday Sessions
Sunday Sessions
Technical Sessions
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Thursday

7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Session 1 - Round Robin

This informal session will allow presenters and attendees to converse and interact on topics related to research or clinical practice in speech-language pathology or audiology. Presenters will speak for 10-15 minutes on a research or clinical topic within their scope of expertise and allow 5-10 minutes of discussion and questions among the attendees.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to restate two main points from the presenter’s ideas or research, cite two resources for further research on the topics presented, articulate one way they could apply this new research or clinical practice in their work setting.

Level of Learning: Introductory

8:15 pm - 9:15 pm

Session 2 - Ask MSHA

This session will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of MSHA Executive Board members and ASHA Advisory Council to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate level training programs, state licensure requirements and DESE’s implementor model. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Participants will be given an opportunity to ask questions and to contribute to the discussion.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the history of Missouri licensure and certification requirements related to the schools, identify at least three issues impacting service delivery, list pending legislation impacting our professions at both a state and national level.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Friday

8:00 am - 4:30 pm

Session 3 - Day Institute Pediatrics - Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic: A Lifetime of Patient-Focused Team Caret

Rachel Warman, AuD, CCC-A, Children’s Mercy Hospital; Jeffrey Goldstein, MD, Children's Mercy Hospital; Shao Jiang, MD, Children's Mercy Hospital; Heather Hendricks, DDS, MD, Children's Mercy Hospital; Helen Huff, RN, BSN, IBCLC, Children's Mercy Hospital; Erin Lindhorst, MS, RD, LD, Children's Mercy Hospital; Brenda Sitzmann, MS, CCC-SLP, Children’s Mercy Hospital

Children with cleft lip and/or palate present with complex medical needs that are best met by comprehensive team care. Members of the Cleft and Craniofacial Team at Children’s Mercy will explore key areas of team care from the prenatal period to early adulthood including surgical intervention, orthodontic needs, feeding and nutrition considerations, common hearing concerns, and speech and resonance impairments. The Children’s Mercy Cleft and Craniofacial Team consists of 49 professionals from 13 departments including audiology, dentistry, ENT, genetics, lactation, neurosurgery, nursing, nutrition, orthodontics, occupational therapy, social work, speech-language pathology and plastic surgery. The team provides care for more than 1,500 children and their families from the prenatal period to early adulthood making it one of the largest programs in the six-state region including Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Arkansas. The clinic is recognized by the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association and provides services at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri and Children’s Mercy Kansas in Overland Park, Kansas.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the importance of team care for a child with cleft lip and/or palate, understand the basic timeline of care for a child with cleft lip and/or palate, identify two common audiology concerns for patients with cleft lip and/or palate.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 4 - Day Institute Adult - TBI: The SLP's Blueprint for a Master Treatment Plan

Lynn Drazinski, MA, CCC-SLP, Augustana College

Speech-language pathologists providing treatment for individuals who have sustained traumatic brain injury are tasked with providing intervention for a vast range of cognitive deficits, from impaired consciousness to executive dysfunction, and often for a long period of time. Effective treatment for these individuals requires consideration of multiple overarching themes. This day institute will present a detailed examination of those themes by providing related neurophysiological factors, theoretical principles and the basis of evidence for their clinical application. This collective information can provide clinicians with a useful tool for treatment planning for all stages of recovery and levels of severity.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to name four overarching themes for consideration in planning treatment for the cognitive deficits associated with traumatic brain injury, discuss the neurophysiological factors associated with each of the intervention themes, discuss the theoretical principles and evidence associated with each of the intervention themes.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 5 - dentifying SLI, Dyslexia and Related Disorders and Planning Interventions

t the turn of the millennium, ASHA published papers on the roles of speech-language pathologists in reading and writing with preschool and school-age children. Now, several states, including Missouri, are passing legislation related to specifically identifying students with dyslexia. School-based SLPs take varied approaches to filling these roles, depending on their training, traditions and tools. Presenters will explain why mandates for evidence-based practice call for new traditions and tools for identifying language/literacy disorders and directing next steps; why some traditional practices should be discarded (e.g., self-constructed test batteries, uniform cut score levels, and dichotomies between receptive and expressive language); and why oral and written language should be assessed and treated in tandem when working with students and communicating with teachers and parents. The Test of Integrated Language and Literacy SkillsTM (TILLSTM) and Student Language ScaleTM (SLSTM) will be introduced as tools that can facilitate new ways of practicing and addressing students’ individualized needs.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the quadrant model and how it can contribute to differential diagnosis, look at varied profiles of strengths and weaknesses and comment on whether they are consistent with dyslexia, differentiate dyslexia from other forms of language/literacy disorders.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Session 6 - The Art and Science of Mentoring: Strategies and Resources

Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University; Elizabeth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City Schools; Patricia Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Missouri Public Schools

This session will facilitate discussion on mentoring and supervision strategies related to various work settings, including documentation, licensure, ethical issues and other areas that impact the entry-level professionals and supervisors. During this session, the project titled, MSHA Mentoring Young Professionals Program (MMYP) will be discussed. MMYP is intended to nurture our graduate students and entry-level professionals by cultivating the culture of mentoring. The program provides mentoring services to graduate students as well as clinical fellows via web-based meetings, webinars and face-to-face roundtable meetings at the Convention. Finally, specific strategies will be discussed to ensure successful work in school settings. Strategies for mentoring will also be addressed along with resources.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to demonstrate an understanding of practice issues in school settings as well as other employment settings,identify specific strategies to achieve their professional and personal goals, mentors and clinical supervisors will be able to locate and gather information and resources on mentoring.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Session 7 - Helping Children Who Are Unintelligible Become More Intelligible

Julie Hoffmann, MA, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

What changes can be made in therapy and at home for kids with severe articulation, motor speech or phonological disorders who are very talkative, demonstrate good gains with improving speech in therapy, yet remain highly unintelligible? These clients often do well during drill or practice tasks with words and sentences yet significantly break down during rapid speech when expressing themselves. They typically have little to no awareness that the listener does not understand them. A critical component necessary for improving overall speech intelligibility is self-monitoring, a skill that often has to be explicitly taught to children with severe articulation, motor speech or phonological disorders. What gets in the way of being intelligible? What therapy techniques can help these children make gains with intelligibility? How do you address frustration from children who do not like to self-correct during conversation as it is bothersome to stop when speaking? It is important to train caregivers to increase their own perceptions and awareness of continued issues their children have in conversational speech so they can effectively help them outside of therapy. We do not want these children to “shut down” or decrease their talking due to not being understood, so helping them become more intelligible is essential.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify specific issues that negatively impact overall speech intelligibility for the talkative child with articulation, motor speech or phonological disorders, describe how to teach a child to self-monitor conversational speech for speech errors and intelligibility, identify specific speech therapy techniques that could help clients to improve speech intelligibility.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

1:15 pm - 2:15 pm

Session 9 - Creating a Criterion-Referenced Assessment for Spelling

Christine Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

Spelling was once considered a core academic subject in which orthography and morphology were taught as part of its core. More recently, spelling has had a minor role in the schools (Schlagal), i.e., students receive a weekly word list to memorize and then take end of week spelling test. Spelling is not soley a visually based skill (Joshi, et al.; Kamhi & Hinton), but rather requires extensive knowledge of several linguistic components: phonology, orthography and morphology (Cassar et al., Moats) to be a proficient speller. Scoring spelling tests have also been problematic, in that they only provide a percent correct or incorrect score and fail to yield any information as to what type of error the client produced. By analyzing spelling errors according to each linguistic component, more information can be gleaned from the types of errors created by the client. Analyzing errors according to linguistic component essentially creates a criterion-referenced assessment which is individualized for each client. Analyzing errors by linguistic component aids the clinician in developing specific therapy goals that will address the client’s spelling errors.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify spelling errors by type of linguistic component, analyze spelling words according to linguistic components rather than scoring as correct or incorrect, create an individualized criterion-referenced assessment for spelling.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 10 - Dysfluencies in Preschoolers: What's An SLP To Do?

Greg Turner, PhD, University of Central Missouri; Nancy Montgomery, PhD, University of Central Missouri; Josh Brown, BS, University of Central Missouri; Victoria Talley, BS, University of Central Missouri

When faced with a preschooler who is exhibiting dysfluencies, speech-language pathologists (SLP) must conduct a thorough evaluation to decide if the dysfluencies are developmental in nature or if they are in fact the beginning of a stuttering disorder. Since the incidence of fluency disorders is low, many speech-languagepathologists have limited experience with this population. The variability of the dysfluencies as a result of internal and external factors, also may make this a challenging decision. Case studies of clients seen in a clinical setting will be utilized during this presentation to illustrate the differential diagnostic process. Recent research on diagnostic predictors of preschool stuttering will be discussed and diagnostic tools and techniques will be presented as part of the evaluation process. The Missouri criteria for a fluency disorder will be reviewed and discussed as it relates to various fluency clients. Advocacy for fluency clients will be discussed, as well as resources that are available to assist SLPs and parents of children suspected as having a fluency disorder.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to differentiate normal dysfluent behaviors and characteristics that indicate the beginning of stuttering, identify appropriate assessment procedures and tools to identify stuttering, describe current research in the area of fluency disorders in young children.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 11 - Reaching the Artist Within: Enhancing QOL of Complex AAC User

Gale Rice, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University; Stacey Zerrusen, Fontbonne University; Carmen Russell, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University; Scott Deters, Fontbonne University; Cindy Deters, Fontbonne University

The focus of language therapy has moved from an impairment based approach to a functional communication approach. Every area of the speech-language pathologists scope of practice should focus on helping the client participate in life at the highest level possible. Those sorts of treatment goals are more apparent when thinking about a person with aphasia or a child with a developmental delay. It is more challenging – or may not have occurred at all to the SLP – to think about quality of life goals for a person who has motor-based complex communication needs. This session will feature Scott a man in his early 30s who has spastic quadrilateral paresis due to cerebral palsy and uses an AAC device to communicate. Scott comes from an artistic family and had a strong desire to create art himself. Scott will explain how he uses a multi-modal communication strategy to create art and provide a live demonstration of his painting techniques. In addition, information about writing goals and developing treatment plans around this type of activity will be explored.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify low tech AAC to meet communication needs to facilitate creating art as a quality of life outcome, identify high tech AAC to meet communication needs to facilitate creating art as a quality of life outcome, identify resources available to people with motor impairments who wish to create art to enhance quality of life.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

1:45 pm - 2:45 pm

Session 12 - Accessing the Community: Special Needs in Your Place of Worship

Kristi Hinton, MSEd, MAR, CCC-SLP, Abundant Life Church; Shirley Brummett, MSEd, CCC-SLP, Raytown Quality Schools and Abundant Life

Frequently, our students, adults and caregivers of those with special needs require assistance and support in accessing the community. Feeling as though they don’t have the resources or skills they need, sometimes places of worship can feel overwhelmed at the prospect of serving those with special needs. This session discusses one model of supporting preschoolers through adults in your place of worship – what it looks like, how it helps the whole family, helps to educate the local community on special needs and serve as a resource to others.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify how a special needs program at a local place of worship can benefit families, describe what a special needs program at a local place of worship can look like, consider local places of worship as a possible resource to assist those with special needs.

Level of Learning: Introductory

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Session 13 - Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorders

Belinda Worley, MS, CCC-SLP

I am Bellinda Worley, a speech-language pathologist since 2000 and the mom of a child on the autism spectrum. While attending college and through various CEU opportunities as a professional, I have been provided with amazing tools to help in the treatment of those children on the autism spectrum. Nothing has challenged me or given me more pride than learning through the eyes of my child. Through Emma I have a story to tell and skills to share to enhance the therapy sessions of fellow speech-languag pathologists. I am the proud owner of Bootheel Pediatric Therapy, in Dexter, Missouri, serving Southeast Missouri. I am honored to work closely with parents challenged with day to day struggles of raising a child with special needs. I am a proud member of Autism Awareness of Southeast Missouri. I serve on the Southeast Missouri Parent Advisory Counsel reporting directly to lawmakers concerning issues and funding for children and families on the autism spectrum. I work closely on a daily basis with Easter Seals Midwest and the SEMO Autism Center. More recently, I have been appointed to the Special Education Advisory Panel, meeting in Jefferson City quarterly, to discuss issues faced by the Department of Special Education.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list the primary characteristics of autism spectrum disorder as presented by very young children, summarize the various treatments and resources available to children with autism spectrum as presented by very young children, discuss therapy ideas and strategies that help children with autism spectrum disorders.

Level of Learning: Introductory

3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Session 14 - Building Bridges Through Collaboration: Effective Practices for Speech-Language Pathologists and Behavior Analysts

Nancy Champlin, MS, BCBA, ACI Learning Centers

Professionals collaborate to improve the long-term outcomes of their mutual clients. This collaboration across disciplines is often viewed as a requirement, rather than mutual consent. Speech-language pathologists and behavior analysts, as well as other professionals, can and should build solid and enduring bridges of professional collaboration. The issue does not stem from what information is distributed, but rather the how and why of the dissemination. This presentation will highlight the instructor’s successful professional relationships across multiple disciplines. In an effort to formulate a reproducible action plan for effective collaboration, the presenter also interviewed several prominent speech-language pathologists to seek out their professional opinions on the aspects of what has made collaboration ineffective. These inadequacies dictate what should become our stepping stones to building solid bridges of collaboration.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to differentiate effective and ineffective communication strategies during collaboration, recall 10 points that can make collaboration ineffective, identify positive talking points to make collaboration across all disciplines effective.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 15 - Cochlear Implants: Indications, Functions, Team Approach and Pre and Post-Operative Care

Roseanna Arand, AuD, CCC-A, University of Missouri

Cochlear implant indications are expanding, leading to a larger population of candidates. This session will highlight indications, functions and expectations with a cochlear implant/s for both adults and children. In addition, the multi-disciplinary approach involved for helping these patients achieve their optimal hearing and understanding throughout the cochlear implant process will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify which disciplines are primarily involved in the pre- and post-operative care for cochlear implant patients, name at least two indications for adult cochlear implants, identify at least two benefits aural rehabilitation provides for cochlear implant recipients.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

3:15 pm - 5:15 pm

Session 16 - AAC: Ready - Set - GOAL!

Betsy Clifford, MHS, CCC-SLP, Saltillo Corporation; Amanda Hettenhausen, MAR, CCC-SLP, Saltillo Corporation

Writing goals and measuring progress for individuals using AAC can be challenging. This may be due to the fact that progress is often represented by very small changes or those changes may not be easily quantified. This sessoin will provide resources, tools and a framework to create individualized goals and objectives for individuals using AAC. Participants will have the opportunity to practice writing at least one goal and related objectives. It will also include a discussion related to creating goals for communication partners to increase overall success for the individual using AAC.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify resources to support writing goals and objectives for AAC, identify available tools to assist in monitoring progress, list the four areas of communicative competence for AAC use.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 17 - Improving Cultural Proficiency Through Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders

Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University; Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

Given the rise in cultural and linguistic diversity in the United States, health care professionals including speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are expected to be culturally proficient in order to provide quality care to the clients with communication disorders. In order to become cultural proficient, SLPs should be able to assess their own cultures, acknowledge the cultural differences and identify them, adapt to diversity and maintain culturally proficient environments. The purpose of this session is three-fold. First, this session will provide participants a summary of results from current research related to cultural and linguistic diversity and policy regarding working with individuals and families from cultural and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Second, this session will give participants opportunity to explore their cultures as a step to becoming culturally proficient. Third, this session will engage participants in working through case studies featuring adult clients and their families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds using evidence based practice.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the policies regarding working with diverse clinical populations based on findings from current research, identify their own cultural competency and proficiency based on given assessments, analyze and synthesize intervention strategies pertaining to diverse populations based on given case scenarios.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

3:15 pm - 4:15 pm

Session 18 - Bridging the App Gap: Adapting Interactive Apps to Support Therapy

Michelle Vomund, MEd, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

Interactive tablet applications, such as Socrative, BaiBoard, Explain Everything, Inspiration and iMovie are being used to facilitate interaction, improve participation and, most importantly, increase learning. Research has shown that individuals learn best through experiential learning (Bergstrom, 2016) and retain more through repeated quizzing than repeated studying (Roediger & Karpicke, 2006). Similarly, clients of all ages may benefit from interactive experiences created with the use of these apps. This session will focus on using these apps through hands-on demonstrations and practice. Specifically, methods of increasing practice through quizzing software, facilitating discussion during group therapy sessions and using technology to engage clients will be discussed. An introduction of these apps will be provided. The focus will be on the use in therapy, but an explanation on how these apps are being used in clinical education setting will be included. Participants will have an opportunity to use the apps during the session for hands-on learning. This technological experience can transform therapy interactions. Content will be applicable to clinicians working with children and adults as well as educators. Bringing devices is encouraged (but some will also be provided)!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to demonstrate how interactive tablet applications improve interactions and learning in clinical and educational settings, develop client interactions with the use of technology for individual or group therapy sessions, construct effective repetition exercises through quizzing applications.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Session 19 - School Services Update

Sharon Sowder, MA, CCC-SLP, Ozarks Medical Center; Elizabeth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City Schools; Pat Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Missouri Public Schools; Diane Golden, PhD, MO-Case

The purpose of this session is to inform the MSHA membership with respect to proposed and/or new standards and the impact on speech-language pathologists working in the school setting. Specifically, certification and licensure issues will be discussed as well as the eligibility criteria for language impairment and speech.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the historical perspective in Missouri with respect to licensure, certification and eligibility criteria, describe the requirements of Missouri licensure and certification necessary to work in the schools, identify the similarities and differences between Missouri’s current language impairment criterion and proposal for new criterion.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session 20 - NSSLHA Share Session

Taylor Carmichael, BS, University of Central Missouri; Avery Bowling, BS, University of Central Missouri; Dana Fritz, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri, Columbia; Sarah Meine, University of Missouri, NSSLHA President; Erika Murphy, University of Missouri, NSSLHA Vice President

NSSLHA officers, members, and advisors will share their chapter's successes and concerns to improve their NSSLHA chapter. Discussion topics will be national NSSLHA, dues, community service, meeting and philanthropic ideas, etc.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to meet other officers, members and advisors of Missouri NSSLHA chapters, discuss national NSSLHA requirements and questions, discuss their successes and concerns of their NSSLHA Chapter.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 21 - Taking It to the Streets! Expanding the Conversation

Linda Barboa, PhD, CCC-SLP, Springfield Public Schools; Elizabeth Obrey, ARC of the Ozarks

Advocacy is a gift we can each give ourselves, our profession and the population we serve. Because the ability to advocate effectively depends on highly developed communication skills, audiologists and speech-language pathologists are well prepared and must step forward to accept this challenge. Children and adults who are disadvantaged in any way need advocates. Powerful, entitled people are privileged to need it less. Our clients are often marginalized and misunderstood. It is imperative that we become the voice for those in need and teach others about the population we dedicate our careers to serving. This session guides the attendees to understand the advocacy process and the steps they can take to become effective advocates. Attendees will be given the tools to build the bridges to connect with clients, parents, other professionals and the community. Hope lies in building those bridges and learning to advocate effectively.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list the three major steps of effective advocacy, describe three practical leadership strategies for expanding knowledge and advocating for self, clients and the profession, within the work environment, describe three practical leadership strategies for expanding knowledge and advocating for the profession and our clients within the community and globally.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

5:30 pm - 6:30 pm Saturday

7:00 am - 8:00 am

8:00 am - 10:00 am

Session 24 - Cleft Palate and Resonance Disorders: Myths, Legends, Best Practices

Lynn Marty Grames, MA, CCC-SLP, St. Louis Children's Hospital, Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Institute; Mary Blount Stahl, MA, CCC-SLP, St. Louis Children's Hospital, Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Institute

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Among practicing speech-language pathologists, there exists a wide range of beliefs and practice patterns concerning individuals with resonance disorder, or those born with cleft lip/palate or craniofacial differences. This is likely related to variability in the education of speech pathologists in these areas, and to limited practicum experiences available for clinicians-in-training. This session presents a variety of beliefs and practices that have been encountered at a cleft palate treatment center treating patients from a large geographic area. Two cleft palate speech specialists will discuss the veracity of each belief or practice. The evidence to support or refute the ideas and current best practice standards will be reviewed. Evaluation and therapy techniques that can easily be adapted to school, private practice or early intervention settings will be reviewed. Collaboration with the treating medical team will be discussed and encouraged.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe conditions which can be treated with therapy, and those which cannot be treated with therapy, identify at least three common misconceptions regarding care for individuals with cleft lip/palate, describe a method for distinguishing articulation disorder from resonance disorder.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 25 - The ASHA Revised Code of Ethics

Paul Rao, PhD, CCC-SLP, CPHQ, FACHE, Retired

Audiologists and speech-language pathologists need to develop sensitivity to ethical concerns and acquire decision-making strategies when confronted with ethical quandaries. We will focus on ethical considerations in our discipline. After reviewing the Revised Code of Ethics (2015) and an ethical decision-making framework, we will discuss a variety of ethical dilemmas and issues in ethics.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to outline a possible ethical decision making framework for evaluating an issue in ethics, identify the three most frequently registered concerns members voice regarding compliance with the ASHA Code of Ethics, outline steps involved in submitting an ethics’ complaint to the ASHA Board of Ethics e.g., fraud and abuse, list the four major highlights of the 2015 ASHA Revised Code of Ethics.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 26 - The Use of Behavioral Interventions to Teach Appropriate Play Skills

Nancy Champlin, MS, BCBA, ACI Learning Centers

Research supports evidence-based play interventions impact on future communication and language skills, cognitive functioning, as well as social interactions for individuals with autism and developmental disabilities. Instruction will be based upon the presenter's clinical and research experience teaching preschool age children functional play through sociodramatic play. Through a research review, case studies and video modeling, participants will learn to effectively implement behaviorally-based play interventions, from assessment through mastery criteria. Prerequisite skills, programming modifications and effective data collection that can be utilized, will also detailed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to differentiate the developmental stages of play for typically developing children, identify effective assessment of play and implement behaviorally-based interventions to teach each developmental stage of play, differentiate when and how to modify play at each developmental stage of play.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:00 am - 11:00 am

Session 27 - Yes, You CANS! Adding Therapy for CAPDs to an IEP

Jeanane Ferre, PhD, CCC-A, F-ASHA, Private Practice

One cannot treat effectively a disorder that has not been diagnosed specifically. This is especially true of central auditory processing disorders (CAPDs). Although part of the audiologic landscape for more than 60 years, there continues to be debate regarding intervention for central auditory processing among school-age children. This presentation will demystify central auditory processing, clarifying its place within the process of processing as well as the educational significance of providing intervention for these disorders. The session will briefly review types of central auditory processing deficits and focus on development of functional and achievable therapy goals and management strategies that meet the life needs of clients and are in line with Common Core standards.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe continuum and development of verbal processing skills, describe behavioral characteristics of central auditory processing deficits, implement effective intervention (management and remediation) at school that is in line with the Common Core Standards in Academics and Speaking/Listening.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:15 am - 10:15 am

Session 28 - Finishing Strong: Clinical Fellowship Year Decision-Making

Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

This program is designed for graduate students, and focuses on the importance of making good professional decisions when choosing a practice setting for the CFY. A brief overview of potential practice settings, the importance of the CF-Mentor relationship, how to find a job and common pitfalls to avoid will be explored. Understanding that the CFY represents the final piece of a new clinician's education, and finishing strong with a great learning experience will be emphasized.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe three potential practice-settings for the clinical fellowship year, identify three ways to find a clinical fellowship position, explain two elements of a successful CF-mentor relationship.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 29 - Head and Neck Cancer: The Role of the SLP

Michelle Payne, MA, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

Speech-language pathologists have a growing, and changing, role working in patients with head and neck cancer. Each year, approximately 48,000 Americans are diagnosed with a head or neck cancer, with evidence of increasing incidence related to human papillomavirus. As the landscape and treatments for head and neck cancer evolve, speech pathologists have an increasing role in treating patients with dysphagia secondary to their tumor and the modality used to treat their cancer. This presentation will discuss current treatment options for head and neck cancer and their influence on swallowing and the speech pathologist’s role pre-, peri- and post-treatment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify three treatment options for head and neck cancer, explain long-term side effects of radiation, explain the goal of pre-surgical and pre-radiation evaluation.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Sesion 30 - Treatment of Cognitive-Linguistic Deficits in Dementia: Case Study and Update

Carlotta Kimble, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Greg Turner, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Jessica Wilder, BS, University of Central Missouri

The purpose of the presentation is to provide a review of the most recent research studies targeting the treatment of cognitive-linguistic deficits in individuals with dementia from the perspective of a speech-language pathologist. In addition, a case history presentation will be provided describing the treatment for a patient with mild Alzheimer's dementia. The rationale, treatment and outcomes will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to recall the cognitive-linguistic deficits in individuals with dementia, distinguish between different categories of cognitive-linguistic treatment for individuals with dementia, recall procedures implemented for space retrieval and errorless learning.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 31 - Feeding the Medically Complex Pediatric Patient

Brenda Sitzmann, MA, CCC-SLP, Children's Mercy Hospital

record

Feeding difficulties are often the result of multiple factors including medical concerns, feeding skill deficits and behavioral concerns. During this session we will explore the impact of medical concerns such as NG/g-tube/j-tube feedings, eosinophilic esophagitis, tracheostomy, laryngomalacia, tracheomalacia and laryngeal cleft on oral intake in the pediatric population. Clinical feeding evaluation and feeding therapy techniques to address these concerns will be discussed and demonstrated.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify five medical conditions that may impact oral feedings in the pediatric population, discuss the impact of non-oral feedings on oral intake, demonstrate knowledge of five evaluation and therapy techniques to improve feeding skills in medical complex pediatric patients.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:45 am - 11:45 am

Session 32 - The Impact of Content and Function Words on Intelligibility

Anna Guilkey, BHS, University of Missouri; Dana Fritz, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

Since 2006, undergraduate and graduate student clinicians in the Department of Communication Science and Disorders at the University of Missouri (MU) in Columbia, have been working with nonnative English speakers in the MU Accent Modification and Pronunciation Program (AMP) to improve their American English pronunciation and intonation, with the goal being to increase participants’ overall intelligibility. This session will present data from the 2015-2016 academic year that suggests unfamiliar listeners, on average, understand more function words (i.e., grammatical, connecting words) than content words (i.e., meaning-carrying words) in nonnative speakers’ language samples. Implications for functional communication between native and nonnative English speakers will be discussed. In addition, gains in overall intelligibility, defined as the percentage of a nonnative speaker’s speech an unfamiliar listener is able to understand in a structured speaking task, and variations in intelligibility outcomes by language group will be explored. Application of this information to other populations where intelligibility is a concern will be explored.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to differentiate between content and function words, discuss the significance of intelligibility scores obtained from a Sentence Intelligibility Test, predict how communicative exchange may be impacted by whether or not an unfamiliar listener understands more function versus content words.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Session 33 - Communication Partners: Fostering Social Participation For Individuals With Aphasia

Jennifer Kerr, MS, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University

The Missouri State University Communication Partners Program pairs volunteer undergraduate students majoring in communication sciences and disorders with adults who have acquired cognitive and/or communication disorders in order to facilitate social interaction, promote community engagement and reduce feelings of isolation. Students are selected to work in pairs as volunteer conversational partners and are required to commit to a minimum of one year of service. Students are advised and supervised by Clinical Assistant Professor, Jennifer Kerr, and are expected to work largely independently with scheduling monthly visits, planning activities for their partners, documenting visits and completing a written self-reflection at the conclusion of their experience. Students do not provide therapy, but rather, provide socially enriching encounters aimed at engaging their partners in participation activities of choice. The program has been mutually rewarding for both students and client participants.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list three goals of a communication partner program related to the social model therapy approach for adults with communication disorders, identify three program development aspects that must be considered when establishing a volunteer communication partner program, list a minimum of three positive outcomes that have resulted from the communication partner program.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 34 - Lay-Public Conceptualization of Stroke: A Content-Analysis of YouTube Comments

Addison Pittman, BS, Rockhurst University; Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that each year approximately 795,000 people will have a stroke. An individual’s timely response to stroke-like symptoms can help reduce the risk of significant disability or death if medical interventions are administered early for an acute stroke. Increasing people’s understanding of stroke is an important first step in improving individual’s responses to stroke-like symptoms. This ongoing study is part of a larger study aimed at understanding how people conceptualize stroke, and based on this conceptualization, how people intend to act on a stroke. The research presented in this session focuses on stroke education via YouTube and the subsequent response to this education. The investigators analyzed videos aimed at stroke education that was disseminated through YouTube for content and message. User responses to videos including comments, likes and overall number of views were analyzed. User comments were further coded with a qualitative content analysis to capture how people understand stroke, what people identify as stroke symptoms, and how people respond to the stroke education presented via this media. The stroke videos were also analyzed for content including the intended message. The goal of these findings are twofold: to support dissemination of stroke information and education in meaningful and user friendly ways that will encourage people to treat stroke as emergency and formulate a plan of action, and to improve health care providers’ understanding of their clients’ stroke knowledge.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify how the lay public interacts with health messages available in the public sphere, describe the types and content of health education about stroke presented on YouTube, describe the basic principles of dissemination of health information.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 35 - Millennials: Meet Your Mentors

Carol Koch, EdD, CCC-SLP, Samford University

In the field of speech-language pathology, high value is placed on clinical practicum experiences. A key component of this learning experience is the mentoring provided by the clinical educators. The supervisory process is intended to guide, and support the graduate student clinician through hands-on clinical training with the goal of developing clinical and professional knowledge and skills (Newman, 2005). For the first time in our history, we have four separate and distinct generations working together (Lancaster & Stillman, 2002). This includes preceptors and supervisors providing clinical education opportunities for graduate student clinicians. Each generation has developed a unique identity that has been shaped by history and life experiences. The unique set of characteristics has significant influence on the dynamics involved in the supervisory experience. Clinical educators of these millennials are likely members of the Traditionalists, Baby Boomers and Gen Xers. Each generation has developed patterns of learning and communicating that present challenges to the dynamic of the supervisory process. Through the exploration of generational characteristics and differences, participants will have the opportunity to identify their own unique traits that serve to shape and influence their role in a supervisory relationship. Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to develop a perspective of the generations represented in their preceptors or supervisors. Developing a perspective of the unique characteristics that comprise the supervisory relationship will equip graduate students with knowledge and tools to guide them in the supervisory component of clinical practicum experiences.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify characteristics of the millenial generation, identify characteristics of other generations, describe strategies for enhancing the supervisory process.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

Session 36 - President's Celebration - Changing Lives Through Communication

The luncehon presentation will address how ASHA’s Vision making effective communication, a human right, accessible and achievable for all serves as the keystone to our convention theme of Changing Lives Through Communication. As 188,000 strong audiologists and speech-language pathologists touch the communication abilities and disabilities of millions of lives, we become change agents in our patients/clients and their families. Daniel Webster wrote, “If all my possessions were taken from me with but one exception, I would choose to keep the power of communication, for by it, I would soon regain all the rest!” What an awesome declaration of independence! Communication is power. We will review illustrative stories and strategies of how our professional discipline changes and empowers lives through our varied efforts in the art and science of hearing and speech science. From evidence based practice to compassionate listening and coaching, we are the access channels to making doing possible.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to define human communication and its disorders as it relates to ASHA’s Vision and MSHA’s Convention theme, outline the levels of the International Classification of Function, describe at least three illustrations from this session that can be used constructively in advocating for the needs of the person served.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Session 37 - AAC on the Fly: Simple Strategies to Support Communication

Melanie Meir, PhD, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

Speech-language pathologists frequently encounter patients who may benefit from AAC during a session. However, resources are typically limited, and acquiring high-tech devices or appropriate communication boards may not always be feasible. Simple strategies can be implemented on the fly with gestures, paper, pens, markers and common objects. These tools can help determine the level of communication the patient is able to use, such as object-level, drawing-level or word-level. They help determine the comprehension and expression abilities of the client. Once the level of communication is established, the SLP can then communicate with the patient at the patient’s level. This clinician has applied these techniques to clients who have neurological diseases, aphasia, apraxia of speech, hearing impairment, dementia, left-neglect, TBI, locked-in syndrome and those not proficient in English when an interpreter was not available. These same strategies can be applied to a school setting. By understanding these possibilities, SLPs will be more able to successfully evaluate and treat patients who require AAC when given limited resources. Through case studies and hands-on practice, participants will be able to see how simple strategies can be applied to help a wide range of patients. During this interactive session, participants will be able to see some AAC options they can implement and apply the skills to straightforward and to more complex cases. By practicing these simple AAC strategies, participants will have specific techniques they can implement starting with their next patient.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to employ simple AAC strategies in medical and educational settings when high-tech AAC options are not readily available, apply simple AAC strategies to straightforward and complex cases, evaluate the receptive and expressive abilities of complex clients who rely on AAC to communicate, such as determining whether a patient can use objects, photographs, drawings or words to understand and communicate.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Session 38 - Building Bridges Through Collaboration: Effective Practices for Speech-Language Pathologists and Behavior Analysts

Nancy Champlin, MS, BCBA, ACI Learning Centers

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Professionals collaborate to improve the long-term outcomes of their mutual clients. This collaboration across disciplines is often viewed as a requirement, rather than mutual consent. Speech-language pathologists and behavior analysts, as well as other professionals, can and should build solid and enduring bridges of professional collaboration. The issue does not stem from what information is distributed, but rather the how and why of the dissemination. This presentation will highlight the instructor’s successful professional relationships across multiple disciplines. In an effort to formulate a reproducible action plan for effective collaboration, the presenter also interviewed several prominent speech-language pathologists to seek out their professional opinions on the aspects of what has made collaboration ineffective. These inadequacies dictate what should become our stepping stones to building solid bridges of collaboration.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to differentiate effective and ineffective communication strategies during collaboration, recall 10 points that can make collaboration ineffective, identify positive talking points to make collaboration across all disciplines effective.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 39 - More From Fluoro 1: Subjective Impressions in Dysphagia Assessment

Rebecca Leonard, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of California, Davis/p>

Many clinicians rely primarily on subjective impressions from fluoroscopic swallow studies to assess swallow function in dysphagic patients. Impressions related to the presence or absence of aspiration, and the relative normalcy of the timing and behavior of structures critical to swallow safety and effectiveness, are typically considered. As compared to quantitative data, subjective impressions, other than those based on binary judgments, have generally demonstrated only marginal reliability across judges, which limits their clinical utility. In some cases, however, available information that does not lend itself to ready quantification can still be of great value in understanding dysphagia in individual patients. In the current presentation, examples of this type of information will be reviewed, with specific emphasis on how these observations contribute to understanding and treating dysphagia in individual patients. Focus on unique anatomical characteristics, differential effects of bolus size and consistency on swallow safety and efficiency, site of aspiration relative to airway closure, compensatory adaptations to impairments (self-imposed, physiologic or externally applied), and the value of an anterior-posterior esophageal screen, will all be addressed. By the session’s conclusion, it is hoped that attendees will have a good understanding of the pros and cons of subjective impressions made from fluoroscopic swallow studies, and of the utility of this information in formulating treatment plans for dysphagic patients.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain pros and cons of subjective impressions in the interpretation of fluoroscopic swallow studies, identify anomalies on the fluoroscopic A-P screen of the esophagus, relate specific oral-pharyngeal abnormalities to swallow impairment.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 40 - Pediatric Videofluoroscopic Swallow Studies: Looking Beyond Aspiration

Brenda Sitzmann, MA, CCC-SLP, Children's Mercy Hospital

Videofluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) provide a wealth of information beyond aspiration. This presentation is primarily aimed at the non-medically based speech-language paathologist (but all are welcome to attend) and will discuss appropriate VFSS referrals, patient preparation for the procedure, general study protocols, analysis of the study and accompanying report, as well as the pros and cons of VFSS vs. Flexible Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES) in the pediatric population.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify pediatric patients who would benefit from a Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study (VFSS), identify three signs of oral dysphagia and three signs of pharyngeal dysphagia that may be evaluated via a VFSS, discuss the pros and cons of VFSS and FEES.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 42 - Sensational Resumes and Successful Interviews

Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

This interactive session will address the development of a professional resume and employment interviews. Emphasis will be on developing a unique, professional document that highlight individual achievement and skills obtained during graduate education and life experiences that may pertain to professional practice. Paper and online job applications will be considered. Participants are asked to bring a list of educational and vocational experiences that could be used to develop their first professional resume. Etiquette and strategies for maximizing success in employment interviews will be included. Preparation for interview questions asked by the employee and questions that the applicant should ask of the prospective employer will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify strategies for developing and maintaining a professional resume, distinguish between formats for the professional resume, determine educational and vocational experiences that may be appropriate to include in the professional resume, develop strategies for preparing for employment interview questions.

Level of Learning: Introductory

2:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session 42 - Student Technical Session Part 2

Session 43 - Building Bridges to Serve Students Who Have Hearing Loss

Donna Smiley, PhD, CCC-A, Arkansas Children's Hospital

There are many opportunities for audiologists and school personnel to work collaboratively to maximize student outcomes. This session will focus on the needs of students who have hearing loss in the preschool to school-aged range. We will brainstorm ways to work together to improve the outcomes of these students.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain hearing loss and to demonstrate the effect of hearing loss in the classroom, formulate a list of important questions school personnel should ask when they find out they will have a student with hearing loss in their classroom, describe ways to collaborate and communicate with other professionals and to justify time in their schedules for this activity.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

Session 44 - Fostering Growth and Retention in a School-Based SLP Department

Shirley Brummett, MSEd, CCC-SLP, Raytown Quality Schools; April Jardes, MS, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University; Kelsey Borer, MS, CCC-SLP, Raytown Quality Schools; Michelle McOsker, BS, Rockhurst University

It is not unusual for local school districts to experience staff shortages in their efforts to serve students within their communities. This session discusses the value of school speech-language pathologists partnering with university programs to their mutual advantage. A rich partnership between the university and school district setting helps to address staff shortages, gives student interns a wide variety of practicum opportunities, provides the potential for highly qualified future employees and helps to develop a strong SLP department through mentorship, professional development and post-graduate supervision .

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the benefits of partnership with local universities and mentorship of student clinicians to promote professional development and growth of a district-wide SLP program, examine and describe effective mentorship strategies from student internships through the CFY, identify strategies and resources to promote professional development, growth and retention of professionals within a district-wide SLP program.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 45 - It’s Showtime: A Ten-Year Retrospective of AAC Family Theatre Camp

Gale Rice, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University; Carmen Russell, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University; Richard Lewis, PhD, CCC-A, CED, Fontbonne University

It has been 10 years since the Department of Communication Disorders & Deaf Education Department (CDDE) at Fontbonne University offered the first It’s Showtime: Augmentative & Alternative Communication Family Theatre Camp. What started as an idea for one camp in 2006 has grown into two camps per year. Nineteen camps later, we take a look at what worked, what didn’t and what we have learned from the children who use AAC, from their siblings and families, and from our SLP graduate students. Video clips from past camps will be shown.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the benefits of performing in a play as a functional activity for children who use AAC to increase interest or competence in using the device, analyze communication gains among children who use AAC when they perform in a play used as a functional activity, identify learning outcomes for graduate students in speech-language pathology who participate in a theatre camp for children who use AAC.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 46 - Prevention of Language/Literacy Disorders: The Role of the School-Based SLP

Laura O'Hara, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University; Allison Phelps, Fontbonne University

This session is designed to share the results of a survey of school-based speech-language pathologists to identify the percentage of SLPs who are providing prevention services, explain to what extent those services are being provided and to describe the preparation SLPs have had to provide these services. The session will discuss specific skills SLPs target during prevention service delivery and will provide strategies SLPs can use when providing services for the prevention of language/literacy disorders.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the current role of school-based SLPs in the prevention of language/literacy disorders, describe specific skills SLPs target during prevention service delivery, perform language/literacy prevention strategies.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 47 - What Variables Predict Social Communication and What Can We Do?

Deborah Hwa-Froelich, PhD, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

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Social communication involves interpretation of facial expressions, identification of mental and emotional states and recognition/expression of pragmatic language. Several researchers have documented that children with language delay or impairment have difficulty with emotion identification, social understanding and pragmatic language. For example, in longitudinal studies of children with a history of language impairment, poorer language competence was related to behavioral, emotional and social problems. More specific research found that children with language impairment had difficulty with identifying emotions from facial expressions and knowing when to disclose or hide their feelings. In addition, research with children described as late talkers indicated they also have difficulty with pragmatic language. While language competence is an important skill for social communication, exposure to social interactions with adults and older children is also important. The literature is unequivocal that social interactions with adults and older siblings are important for the development of social understanding. Researchers have also found that children who were exposed to adverse early care have difficulty with behavior and emotion regulation as well as emotion identification and social understanding. Practitioners serving children with language delay/impairment and social communication problems need to address both needs. Given the limited time available for practitioners to serve their ever-growing caseloads, a language and social-based intervention model would be most efficient. In this session, predictive variables for social communication competence and an evidence-based language and social communication intervention model will be described.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to understand the relationship between language competence and social communication, describe the importance of early social interactions with adults and older siblings in developing social communication competence, plan language-and social-based interventions for individuals with social communication needs.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

7:15 pm - 8:15 pm

Session 48 - Quest For The Cup

University teams comprised of top-notch students compete in a quiz bowl format to see which team can answer the most Praxis practice questions correctly! This session is designed for students preparing to take the Praxis examination, as well as professionals who want to refresh their basic knowledge skills while learning in a fun, interactive and competitive environment. The Quest for the Cup is one of the MSHA Convention's most anticipated annual events. Let the games begin!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will identify the nature of and interventions for speech, language, hearing, swallowing and communication disorders including their etiologies, characteristics, anatomical/physiological, acoustic, psychological, developmental and linguistic and cultural correlates.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Sunday

7:45 am - 8:45 am

9:00 am - 10:00 am

Session 50 - Specialty Certification in Fluency Disorders: What is it and Why do It?

Lynne Shields, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Fontbonne University

This session will provide an overview of board certification in fluency disorders. The benefits to both consumers and speech-language pathologists will be discussed. The role of the American Board of Fluency and Fluency Disorders in developing and maintaining the standards for certification will be summarized. The process of applying for candidacy and the professional portfolio will be reviewed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the role of the American Board on Fluency & Fluency Disorders in development and oversight of the standards for certification, describe the process of becoming a certified specialist in fluency disorders, describe the benefits of certification for both the practitioner and the consumer.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

9:00 am - 11:00 am

Session 51 - Counseling Persons With Aphasia

Paul Rao, PhD, CCC-SLP, CPHQ, FACHE, Retired

The session commences with a consumer perspective and outlines various communication and aging models including the WHO’s Model of Consequences of Pathology, Trieschman’s Aging with a Disability, and Maslow’s Hierarchy of Need. This session will familiarize the clinician with theoretical and practical models that may be effective in counseling persons with aphasia and their significant others. Case studies will illustrate the application of a pragmatic approach and the various means to achieving, measuring and documenting the effectiveness of this approach. In aging with a disability, the individual must balance three competing variables: psychological, organic and environmental. Achieving homeostasis is critical to live a productive life and add life to years. The importance of communication as we age is stressed. When one suffers a communication disorder, understanding the variables to successful aging will be critical to one’s successful rehabilitation and outlook on life. The principles and goals of counseling persons with aphasia will be outlined and reviewed and the characteristics of successful counselors will be described. Caveats to counseling will also be provided in order to keep the clinician patient-focused and practicing within one’s scope and level of expertise. Counseling suggestions for the patient and caregiver will be discussed. The session will conclude with advocating for persons with aphasia to improve access to care, the community’s understanding of aphasia and awareness of the difference between a language and a cognitive disorder and the implications for successful community re-entry.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the WHO’s Model of Consequences of Pathology, outline the components of Trieschman’s ’87 Major Categories of Living, list at least five principles and goals of Counseling Persons with Aphasia.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 52 - Suspected Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Differential Diagnosis - SESSION WITHDRAWN

Session 53 - What Does Project ACCESS Access?

Shannon Locke, MS, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University/ MO-DESE Project ACCESS

A joint initiative between Missouri State University and MO-DESE, Project ACCESS has undergone several re-inventions over the past 30+ years. Come hear what we now have to offer Missouri educators and other providers serving students with autism; including, increased access through online training modules, additional staff and an all new updated, interactive training opportunity coming up in 2017-2018. During this session, we will share philosophical, paradigm shifts in thinking about working with children with autism; review the similarities and differences between educational and medically-based assessments and services; provide ways to encourage collaboration and consistency across services and service-delivery models and introduce a framework to design a comprehensive intervention program to work with individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) individually and/or collaboratively with others using evience based practice (EBP) you already know. This session will focus on working with children with autism in schools, however, information covered will be helpful in any setting and with other students experiencing communication deficits leading to adverse behavioral responses.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to determine what if any services Project ACCESS offers will be beneficial for their practice, identify skills they have and skills they may be missing to work effectively with students with autism, compare and contrast service-delivery models, including the differences between eligibility determination for special education services and medical diagnosis regarding ASD services.

Level of Learning: Introductory

10:00 am - 11:00 am

Internship Survival Guide

Audra Woodard, MS, University of Central Missouri

This session will enlighten the graduate students majoring in speech- language pathology with information regarding his/her internship in the adult internship setting. The students will learn how to prepare for placement, proper ways to communicate with their supervisor, rules to follow related to dress code, HIPPA regulations and common questions will be discussed through the hour session.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to research and prepare for adult internship, gain knowledge of HIPPA and dress code regulations, learn appropriate interaction methods to utilize with supervisors.

Level of Learning: Introductory

10:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 55 - More From Fluoro 2: Objective Measures - Role in Dysphagia Assessment

Rebecca Leonard, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of California, Davis

Fluoroscopy is widely available in the US, and is considered a gold standard in dysphagia assessment. Fluoroscopy is unique in that it permits quantification of dynamic swallow events. The integrity of these behaviors determines the safety and effectiveness of oral-pharyngeal swallow. Used with a standardized protocol, and referenced to age-and gender-matched normal controls, objective measures permit comparisons of individual patients, and patient populations, to normal subjects. Objective tracking of changes in swallow function with time or treatment is also possible. In this presentation, a new software tool for making measures of timing and displacement, and for then plotting and storing the data, will be demonstrated. The utility of such data to evidence-based treatment planning, including decisions regarding oral versus non-oral feeding, the potential for compensatory maneuvers or other strategies, as well as for medical and surgery treatment options, will be a major focus of the session. New information regarding the potential of mechanical data in assessing both risk and potential in patients, and, in particular, risk for aspiration even when not observed during the fluoroscopic study, will also be presented. Finally, preliminary evidence for a new tool designed to quantify post-swallow residue will be demonstrated. By the session’s conclusion, it is hoped that attendees will more thoroughly understand the power of objective measures in managing dysphagic patients, as well as the capabilities of new software tools that improve and expedite the acquisition of these measures.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain basic requirements and techniques for making objective measures of timing and displacement from fluoroscopic swallow studies using available software designed for this purpose, recognize and appreciate the power of objective data pertinent to swallow mechanics in understanding normal and abnormal swallow function, understand specific applications of objective data to the assessment and treatment planning in dysphagic patients.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 56 - Assessing and Strengthening Expository Language Skills in School-Age Children

Stacy Wagovich, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri; Anna Guilkey, BA, University of Missouri

In the school-age years, children are expected to use expository discourse in the classroom, as well as other settings. At school, they are asked to retell curricular information encountered orally or through reading. Outside of school, they are asked to convey complex procedures, such as street directions, the rules to a game or the steps to making a meal. The conceptual complexity of this information often exceeds that of narrative and conversational samples. As a result, expository sample elicitation can be more sensitive in detecting language difficulties than other discourse genres. This session will review the literature on the expository discourse processes in children with language impairments, highlight ways to incorporate and analyze discourse in assessment, and describe ways to strengthen children’s skills in using this type of discourse.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to state the rationale for eliciting expository samples from school-age children with language impairments, describe several expository discourse elicitation procedures and the information that each yields about language, compare the benefits of expository sample data to conversational and narrative data in terms of diagnostic application.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 57 - A Perspective on Transitioning From Clinician to PhD

Sarah Lockenvitz, MA, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University

Working as a clinical speech-language pathologist may not be the best fit for everyone with an interest in the field. Other opportunities exist for those who decide to pursue education beyond the minimum required to practice clinically. From securing initial clinical employment to tackling a dissertation, this presentation outlines one speech-language pathologist's experience with transitioning from student to clinician back to student again, culminating in the securing of an academic faculty position in a communication sciences and disorders program within the state of Missouri. Emphasis on the decision-making process and determining relevant factors that contributed to the decision to return to graduate school with the goal of finding the best way to serve the field in the most effective capacity.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe a process of transitioning from clinician to PhD, identify pros and cons of different career choices, assess their own priorities for making career decisions.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 58 - SLP Access to Research for Evidence-Based Practice

Meredith Harold, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

Speech-language pathologists must stay current on research evidence in order to provide quality evidence-based practice. However, many speech-language pathologists do not regularly access journal articles, nor purposefully seek out CEUs with high levels of evidence. Thus, many SLPs remain quite unaware of current research in the field. This presentation will review the literature on barriers to evidence-based practice. Applicable research on knowledge transfer, implementation science and science communication will be reviewed. Novel methods for connecting clinicians and scholars with each other’s work will also be introduced, including how scientific dissemination may be approached in social media outlets and via various speech-language pathology websites. A new website, designed specifically for efficient scholarly communication in speech-language pathology, will be featured. The Informed SLP (TISLP) was launched in 2016, and provides editorial reviews of recent journal articles applicable to speech-language pathology. TISLP reviews the evidence monthly, then summarizes and comments on the most clinically-relevant articles. These summaries, with links to the original journal articles, are sent to subscribers and later posted online. Preliminary data on the use of TISLP will be reviewed, along with ideas for increasing collaboration between SLPs and speech-language scientists.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to define each evidence-based practice and implementation science, identify barriers to evidence-based practice in speech-language pathology, list several sources for clinician engagement with speech–language scholarship.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 59 - Tips & Tools for AAC in the Classroom

Corey Cathey, MS, CCC-SLP, Therapy Unlimited, LLC

This session is an introductory session of how to incorporate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) into daily classroom routines. Whether a student is using a low-tech or high-tech device, understanding how to incorporate this domain into the school day will increase overall communication opportunities for the AAC user. Through the process of understanding the importance of inclusion of AAC users within the classroom, identifying areas throughout the school day that can incorporate additional AAC opportunities, teaching users how to communicate in a variety of ways (aside from simple requesting tasks), AAC users can increase communication independence and success.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to able to list three benefits for using AAC device in the classroom, identify areas throughout the school day to incorporate AAC use, identify additional uses for AAC communication aside from simple requesting tasks.

Level of Learning: ntroductory

Session 60 - Was Aesop an SLP? Using Fables for Cognitive Linguistic Tasks

Carmen Russell, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

Storytelling is an oft-used treatment task because it is rich with information about the client’s speech intelligibility and communicative ability. It provides data from basic speech skills to higher-order cognitive language use. Not all stories are adequate, however, especially for more demanding language tasks such as making inferences or taking another point of view. Aesop’s Fables are familiar stories that may reduce the memory demand but can be modified to increase the cognitive complexity of the language tasks. The speech-language pathologist can assess skills and measure progress using a simple visual-analog scale. This session will include video clips to show how to use Aesop’s Fables in a treatment session for adults with aphasia.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the benefits of using story telling as an informal assessment of cognitive and language ability, modify an Aesop’s Fable to use as a treatment task for a variety of cognitive linguistic goals, analyze storytelling with the use of a visual-analog scale to measure progress toward higher-order cognitive language goals.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Student Technical Sessions

Friday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

ST 1 - Different Perception of Disability in Public and Private Education Sectors

Abigail Wilson, EdD, Truman State University; Josie Greenemay, Truman State University; Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger AuD, CCC-A Truman State University

Inclusion is becoming increasingly common in many present day classrooms. It is important for teachers and students to have a good understanding of the needs and how to provide support for individuals with disabilities. The purpose of this project was to explore perception of disability in public vs. private elementary schools in both teachers and students.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to compare and contrast perception of disability in public versus private schools, describe the criteria used to classify a disability in the educational system, list three support systems offered in the schools for students with disabilities.

Level of Learning: Introductory

ST 2 - Transformational Experiences for Truman Students in Relation to Communication Disorders

Jana Breedlove, BS, Truman State University; Margo Krause, BS, Truman State University Supervisor: Andrea Richards MS, CCC-SLP Truman State University

The purpose of our study is to survey current seniors, graduate students and alumni of Truman State’s Communication Disorders program about activities they participated in while on campus and whether they considered them transformational experiences. We will research and use thought-provoking questions that will allow the current and past students to examine how those experiences have shaped their current involvement in the community and their career or future career goal. We hope to find that the experience has positively affected them and encouraged civic engagement and reflective learning. Our purpose for the addition of the graduate student survey is to access the continual development of transformational experiences.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain transformational experiences offered at Truman and other communication disorders' programs, explain how transformational experiences will prepare students for their future career aspirations or professional development, explain the most influential qualities gained in transformational experiences.

Level of Learning: Introductory

ST 3 - Knock Some Sense Into Language Development: Therapy for Hearing/Vision Impairments

Taylor Kramer, BS, Truman State University; Supervisor: Andrea Richards MS, CCC-SLP Truman State University

This presentation will focus on how hearing and vision deficits affect the speech and language development of young children. This will be presented through the case studies of two, two year-old boys, enrolled in the Missouri First Steps program. One presents with a profound hearing loss, while the other is legally blind. These cases will be compared and contrasted to demonstrate how each loss has affected the language development of these children. In addition, therapy adaptations to cater to the needs of each child will also be covered. Finally, techniques on how parents and caregivers of children with these deficits can adapt their communication to their child will be presented on as well.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify how the loss of one sense will impact a child’s language development, contrast and explain the different therapy approaches to working with individuals with hearing and vision loss, describe how parents and caregivers can adapt their communication with their child to compensate for these deficits.

Level of Learning: Introductory

ST 4 - Chronic Laryngeal Nerve Stimulation to Improve Swallow Function

Ian Deninger, BS, University of Missouri; Kate L. Osman, MS, University of Missouri, Columbia; Aaron Thiessen, PGY-4 Resident Physician, University of Missouri, Columbia; Alexis Mok, BHS, University of Missouri, Columbia; Daniel Ohlhausen, University of Missouri, Columbia; Brayton Ballenger, University of Missouri, Columbia; Victoria Caywood, University of Missouri, Columbia; Megan Haney, DVM, University of Missouri Veterinary Pathobiology; Jakob Allen, M3, University of Missouri, Columbia Supervisor: Teresa Lever PhD, CCC-SLP University of Missouri

Dysphagia is a major source of morbidity and mortality in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); however, few treatments address the neuropathophysiology. Thus, we developed a protocol to investigate the efficacy and safety of chronic superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) stimulation to improve swallow function and survival in a mouse model of ALS. Thirty two low copy number SOD1-G93A transgenic ALS mice were utilized for acute or chronic procedures for development of a protocol to study chronic SLN stimulation. Mice underwent surgery at four to five months (pre-clinical stage) for implantation of combinations of nano-cuff around the SLN to stimulate swallowing, micro-patch on the digastric muscle for EMG swallow detection, and head-stage for connecting electrode leads to a stimulator and bioamplifier. Earlier head-stage implants lost integrity at two to four weeks. Current implants have survived greater than three months. SLN stimulation in acute preparations consistently evoked EMG-recorded swallowing, demonstrating proof of concept. Current cuff designs are maintaining structural integrity and chronic EMG recordings are consistent; necropsy has exhibited lack of infection or cuff/patch migration. Since then, we have successfully implanted both a nano-cuff and micro-patch in-vivo, establishing a living experimental mouse model of chronic SLN stimulation. Ongoing studies show ALS-affected mice survive at least three months’ post-implantation. Adjustments to our surgical procedure and nano-cuff design are ongoing for improved outcomes. If treated mice maintain swallow function and survive longer, this study helps establish the use of chronic SLN stimulation for dysphagia treatment in ALS. We hypothesize this treatment will significantly improve clinical outcomes for all ALS phenotypes.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to discriminate between normal versus impaired swallow function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, determine that chronic electrical stimulation promotes neural plasticity and regeneration within the central and peripheral nervous systems, justify that chronic laryngeal nerve stimulation promotes the maintenance of normal swallow functioning in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

ST 5 - Perceived Comfort and Confidence in Literature Selection for Preschoolers

Emily Hathorn, Truman State University; Leah Wollmering, Truman State University; Kirsten Kovack, Truman State University; Greta Roettgen, Truman State University Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger AuD, CCC-A Truman State University

This project looked at the perceived comfort and confidence in literature selection for preschoolers. This presentation will explore a language enrichment experience for undergraduate students and its impact on knowledge and comfort of literature selection. The results of this project are of value to further improve the language enrichment experience.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the goals of Early Head Start, list three reasons why it is important to provide literacy enrichment to preschool aged children, identify the characteristics of appropriate literature for preschool aged children.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

ST 6 - Factors Influencing Career Choice in Communication Disorders Majors

Richae Tipton , Truman State University; Randi Slaughter, Truman State University Supervisor: Ilene ELmlinger, AuD, CCC-A, Truman State University

There are many factors that are considered when deciding on a career path in Communication Disorders. This study explored some of the common experiences and opportunities that have the potential to be the most influential in student decision making.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe two major related extracurricular experiences/opportunities available to undergraduate communication disorders majors, describe two undergraduate communication disorders coursework requirements, list the three most influential reported experiences of undergraduate Communication Disorders students when deciding on a career path.

Level of Learning: Introductory

ST 7 - The Effects of Laryngeal Nerve Transection on Swallowing Function

Alexis Mok, BS, University of Missouri; Ian Deninger, University of Missouri; Victoria Caywood, University of Missouri; Brayton Ballenger, University of Missouri; Kate Robbins, MS, University of Missouri, Megan Haney, University of Missouri; Daniel Ohlhausen, University of Missouri; Jakob Allen, BS, University of Missouri; Teresa Lever, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri Supervisor: Teresa Lever PhD, CCC-SLP University of Missouri

Dysphagia is a common postoperative complication of cervical and thoracic surgical procedures, presumably caused by iatrogenic laryngeal nerve injury. It is unknown which laryngeal nerve contributes most to dysphagia and poor medical outcomes after injury. To address this clinically relevant question, we used our established videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) assay to objectively assess swallow function after surgically-induced (iatrogenic) laryngeal nerve injury in a mouse model. C57BL/6J mice (n=40) underwent unilateral or bilateral transection of the superior or recurrent laryngeal nerves (SLN or RLN) or a sham surgery. Swallowing was assessed through VFSS pre-surgery and four days, six weeks and 14 weeks post-surgery. To do so, mice were placed in a custom chamber to freely drink thin liquid contrast. Videos were analyzed to quantify several swallow metrics. Unilateral SLN transection did not result in dysphagia, whereas bilateral SLN transection resulted in significantly altered lick rate and pharyngeal and esophageal transit times compared to baseline. Unilateral RLN transection resulted in longer esophageal transit times. Mice with bilateral RLN transection (n=2) were excluded from the study due to fatal asphyxiation during surgery. SLN versus RLN transection produces different dysphagia profiles in our mouse model. Thus, VFSS is a useful tool to quantify dysphagia after iatrogenic laryngeal nerve injury. We are currently using this model as a platform to investigate the pathophysiology of post-surgical dysphagia and to explore potential treatments.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the implications of iatrogenic laryngeal nerve injury on swallow function, differentiate dysphagia profiles of SLN versus RLN transection, recall how videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) can be used to objectively assess swallow function.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

ST 8 - A Multi-Subsystem Approach to Predicting Speech Intelligibility in Older Adults

Jacob McKinley, BS, University of Missouri Supervisor: Mili Kuruvilla-Dugdale PhD University of Missouri

Structural and physiologic changes occur in the speech subsystems (phonatory, respiratory, articulatory) of healthy older adults and can negatively impact speech performance. However, limited research has investigated the relative contribution of each subsystem decline to speech intelligibility changes in the aging population. The aims of this study were to determine whether intelligibility declines are present in older adults due to age-related subsystem changes and which subsystem has the largest impact on reduced intelligibility. Fifteen healthy, older adults (55-85 years) and fifteen younger adults (20-35 years) participated in instrument-based assessments of the phonatory, respiratory and articulatory subsystems. Acoustic, aerodynamic and kinematic measures that characterize the phonatory, respiratory and articulatory subsystems, respectively, were obtained during sentence, word and nonspeech tasks. The specific measures that will be used in the prediction model are cepstral/spectral index of dysphonia (phonatory), vital capacity (respiratory) and spatiotemporal variability (articulatory). Speech intelligibility for each speaker was determined by naïve listeners during multi-talker babble. Based on the data analyzed so far, we expect to see speech intelligibility declines in healthy older adults. Further, the articulatory subsystem is expected to have the largest contribution to intelligibility changes based on similar studies on children with cerebral palsy (Lee, Hustad, & Weismer, 2013) and adults with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Rong et al., 2016). The long term goal of the study is to establish a prediction model of intelligibility decline for individuals with progressive dysarthrias which will improve the timing of speech service delivery.

earner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to discuss the effects of speech subsystem measures on speech intelligibility of healthy older adults, as compared with healthy, younger adults, state which speech subsystem (represented by objective measures) that contributes primarily to speech intelligibility in older adults, summarize the multiple speech subsystem approach used to collect phonatory, respiratory and articulatory data for speech assessment of older adults.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

ST 9 - Student-Initiated Undergraduate Course: Sign Language for Future Health Professionals

Mackenzie Jones, Truman State University Supervisor: Sheila Garlock MA, CCC-SLP Truman State University

Many underserved and special populations experience health disparities. Deaf and hard of hearing (d/hh) individuals are no exception. According to the Centers for Disease Control, these populations experience higher rates of psychological stress, diabetes and high blood pressure and are more likely than those who do not have a hearing loss to participate in risky behaviors such as smoking or excessive drinking. Patient-centered care and strong communication between provider and client are recognized methods to combat these disparities. However, among d/hh patients, it is the communication barriers and gaps in health literacy that compromise a trusting relationship and limit health care accessibility. Therefore, to decrease morbidity among these special populations, the communication delivery and deaf awareness of health professionals must be targeted through education and training. The Introduction to Sign Language for Future Health Professionals course offered to undergraduate students at a university in Missouri was developed for this purpose. This course was a student-initiated hybrid design with sign language lessons and deaf awareness training to foster increased cultural competence of deaf and hard of hearing populations by pre-professional health students. A research evaluation including a multiple choice pre-post-test, a written application test and qualitative analysis of three class discussions, was implemented to assess the effectiveness of this course. Utilizing a health education framework, this oral presentation will discuss the assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation of the course. Resources will be offered to encourage other educational institutions to implement a similar course into the curriculum.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list three reasons why deaf awareness training is important in decreasing health disparities among deaf and hard of hearing individuals, identify two successful communication channels used to advertise this course, identify two areas of improvement by the students who took the course.

Level of Learning: Introductory

ST 10 - Listen to Your Wife! FCPs in Aural Rehabilitation

Katherine Cammack, BA, St. Louis University Supervisor: Saneta Thurmon Select One St. Louis University

Who knows a client better than their own spouse? And what voice may be the most effective to use in therapy for aural rehabilitation training? Typically a spouse or family member. Research shows that aural rehabilitation is most successful when using frequent communication partners (FCP). In a case study of a cochlear implant patient, both subjective and objective data supported this statement. It is important to acknowledge that not only auditory skill progress but also; overall confidence and communication strategies (for both client and frequent communication partner) gained in Aural Rehabilitation therapy can significantly improve a client’s overall quality of life. In both subjective and objective measures, significant gains were observed, despite this patient being 14 months post cochlear implant activation. Through the Speech Spatial Qualities (SSQ), a subjective measure, an overall increase of 32% for hearing quality was reported by the client. Additionally, at the beginning of the semester, the client was able to auditorily track and comprehend conversation with one speaker and no background noise with 86% accuracy; upon discharge, client could attend to conversation with multiple speakers in background noise with 100% accuracy. The client stated, “You made it easy to be motivated” (referring to the clinicians) and his wife added, “You can just tell it’s so much better” (referring to auditory tracking skills in home). These comments are revealing of the real life impact of the successful aural rehabilitation program to their marriage.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to articulate the importance of using frequent communication partner goals in aural rehabilitation and provide examples of such goals and correlating activities, explain the benefits of utilizing the Speech Spatial Qualities (SSQ) questionnaire in aural rehabilitation for objective and subjective outcome measures and to develop individualized and relevant treatment plans, identify five ways to incorporate frequent communication partners in sessions utilizing skills such as role playing, continuous discourse tracking, phone practice, auditory tracking in background noise and conversational repair strategies.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

ST 11 - Developing a Clinical Tool for Early Detection of Bulbar Dysfunction

Elise Henn, BS, University of Missouri Supervisor: Teresa Lever PhD University of Missouri

The clinical gold standard tests used for bulbar (speech and swallowing) assessment are insensitive to bulbar onset. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop a test battery capable of early detection and accurate tracking of bulbar dysfunction. Toward this goal, we focused on tasks that are sensitive to bulbar decline and are readily amenable to acoustic waveform analysis, as manual analysis methods are impractical for use in clinical settings. Data were collected from 140 participants between 20-90 years who completed two diadochokinetic (DDK) tests that elicit distinct acoustic waveforms and have high inter-rater reliability: a speech syllable repetition task and a novel non-speech tongue tick test that corresponds with lick rate, shown to be sensitive to early dysphagia in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease). Acoustic signals from the two tasks were manually analyzed by two reviewers and also subjected to automatic waveform analysis to extract and analyze acoustic events. Our results show that older adults have significantly slower DDK rates relative to younger adults. Initial automation attempts and manual calculations of DDK events produced similar counts for each task. Events that were erroneously detected during automation are being studied to improve our automatic analysis. While acoustic data collection is quick to perform, manual data analysis is labor intensive and impractical for clinical use. Therefore, we are developing a smartphone app for automated acoustic analysis in real-time to improve the diagnosis and tracking of bulbar decline.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the clinical diagnostic goal standards for the detection of bulbar dysfunction, describe the age related decline in speech and swallowing function, identify the reasons why an automated diagnostic tool will be beneficial in clinical settings.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

ST 12 - The Role of Teacher Perceptions in Collaboration With Speech-Language Pathologists

Michelle McOsker, BS, Rockhurst University Supervisor: Shatonda Jones PhD, CCC-SLP Rockhurst University

The purpose of this presentation is to determine the perceptions and understandings of primary and secondary school teachers toward the field of speech-language pathology in order to determine relationships between teacher experiences (e.g. years of experience, role in special education, family background, etc.) and familiarity with the role of a speech pathologist in a school; potential barriers and/or facilitators to collaboration between speech pathologists and classroom teachers and the need to advocate for the profession of speech-language pathology and for the role in educational settings. This study was conducted in two phases consisting of an online survey distributed to faculty in participating schools and elective follow-up interviews with willing participants. The survey was distributed to 1,204 faculty in schools throughout the Kansas City Metro Area and surround suburbs. One hundred fifty-three individuals responded to the survey, and seven responses were excluded due to not consenting to the survey or extraneous roles that go beyond the scope of this study (administrators, principals, etc.). Four survey respondents participated in follow-up interviews. A summary of the survey data, statistically significant results and a summary of interview responses are presented.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify aspects of teacher experiences and perceptions that pose a barrier to collaboration with speech-language pathologists, identify aspects of teacher experiences and perceptions that facilitate collaboration with speech-language pathologists, describe the need to advocate for the profession in educational settings.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Saturday 2:30 pm - 5:30 pm

ST 13 - Familial SES and the Acquisition of AAC Devices

Mark Brown, BA, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Gale Rice PhD, CCC-SLP Fontbonne University

The purpose of this study is to better understand the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and the acquisition of speech-generating augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices. I hypothesize that the lower one’s SES, the more difficult the acquisition of speech-generating AAC devices will be. This may manifest itself in a number of ways including a longer acquisition process, not getting the desired device, feeling dissatisfied and feeling inadequately informed during the process. Participants were recruited from one of two weekends of an AAC camp. Participants were informed about the study and given consent forms to sign if they chose to participate. Individuals who agreed to participate signed up for a time slot to occur during the weekend during which they were interviewed and then given a brief survey. Participants were interviewed in Fontbonne University’s Eardley Family Clinic for Speech, Language and Hearing, which uses a closed circuit audio and video feedback system that ensures privacy and authorized access only. Participants fell into one of three SES brackets: low, medium, or high. Quantitative results obtained via the survey represent all of the users while the qualitative data is represented as part of a case study. Two AAC users were selected per SES bracket based on a feature match of age and their responses to interview questions were compared. This session will help professionals better understand the role of familial SES and their role as speech-language pathologists in the acquisition process.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to provide at least three supportive strategies to families going through the AAC acquisition process, educate other professionals working with those families regarding at least three challenges they may face while attempting to acquire an AAC device, identify families that need extra assistance with the AAC acquisition process.

Level of Learning: Introductory

ST 14 - Self-Assessment of Clinical Skills

Marissa Badamo, Truman State University; Peyton Galt, Truman State University Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger AuD, CCC-A Truman State University

The purpose of this project is to determine if having more clinical experience helps a clinician to be more accurate when assessing their own clinical skills. This will be accomplished by comparing how new clinicians and more experienced clinicians rate specific clinical skills on a five point scale, as compared to their clinical supervisors.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify how accurate graduate and undergraduate clinicians are at self-evaluation at the beginning of their academic career, identify how accurate graduate and undergraduate clinicians are at self-evaluation at the end of their academic career, list two ways self-evaluations may be helpful in facilitating growth in student clinicians.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

ST 15 - Characterization of Dysphagia Onset in a Mouse Model of ALS

Kaitlin Flynn, BS, University of Missouri; Alexis Mok, BS, University of Missouri; Kate Osman, MA, University of Missouri; Victoria Caywood, University of Missouri; Brayton Ballenger, University of Missouri; Megan Haney, University of Missouri Supervisor: Teresa Lever PhD, CCC-SLP University of Missouri

Research in our lab has identified that the low copy number SOD1-G93A (LCN-SOD1) transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) exhibits dysphagia at disease end-stage. This study aimed to characterize dysphagia onset and progression in this model to identify a therapeutic window for potential treatments. Further, this study sought to determine the effect of serial X-ray exposure during videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) in this mouse model. LCN-SOD1 mice and littermate controls were tested using our freely-behaving VFSS protocol and custom fluoroscope. For single X-ray exposure, a cohort of mice (30 transgenic, 26 controls) underwent VFSS testing once at disease end-stage. For serial X-ray exposure, a separate cohort of mice (13 transgenic, 11 controls) underwent VFSS testing once a month, starting at two months of age until disease end-stage. Compared to controls, LCN-SOD1 mice have significantly slower lick and swallow rates at six months of age. Other swallow metrics remain unaffected until later time points. Mice with serial VFSS testing developed signs of radiation toxicity affecting the skin and eyes. VFSS assessment of the effects of serial X-ray exposure on swallow function is underway relative to the timing of dysphagia onset and rate of progression. Dysphagia onset emerges at six months of age in LCN-SOD1 mice. This information will aid in the timing of experimental treatments for dysphagia in our future studies with this mouse model. Modification of our VFSS system and protocol are underway to reduce radiation toxicity for longitudinal investigations.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain how mouse models are contributing to the scientific knowledge of dysphagia in neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS, characterize the onset and progression of various swallow metrics in a mouse model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), identify the potential negative outcomes of serial radiation across the lifespan.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

ST 16 - Semantic Ambiguity Intervention for Children With Hearing Loss

Kelly Roy, BA, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Susan Lenihan PhD Fontbonne University

Previous research has indicated that a majority of individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing struggle with reading comprehension (Luckner & Handley, 2008). Though there has been extensive research dedicated to improving literacy with children who are deaf or hard of hearing, Luckner & Handley (2008) concluded that there are limited evidence based practices in reading comprehension with this population. In a study conducted by Zipke, Ehri, and Cairns (2009), 46 third graders participated in an intervention targeting semantic ambiguity detection. During the intervention, the students were instructed to analyze multiple meanings of words in various contexts. This intervention effectively taught students to detect semantic ambiguity and resulted in increased reading comprehension on a paragraph-completion task. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether explicit instruction of semantic ambiguity detection would improve reading comprehension for children with hearing loss. Replicating the work of Zipke et al. (2009), four participants, ages seven to 11, received metalinguistic ambiguity instruction in four intervention sessions. During intervention, subjects learned to analyze multiple meanings of words in isolation, in sentences, in riddles and in text taken from the Amelia Bedelia series.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to define semantic ambiguity and types of semantic ambiguity, identify examples of semantic ambiguity that create difficulties for readers, including readers who are deaf/hard of hearing, describe intervention strategies that would support reader success with understanding and identifying semantic ambiguity in isolation, in sentences, in riddles and in text.

Level of Learning: Introductory

ST 17 - The Impact of Training Siblings of Students Who Use AAC

Christine Rich, BS, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Carmen Russell PhD, CCC-SLP Fontbonne University

Social interactions between children and their peers are crucial for development both academically and emotionally. A large body of research has surfaced investigating the benefits of involving peers in either peer training or peer mentor programs to support communication growth for people who use augmentative and assistive communication devices(AAC). There is still relatively little research involving peers, and even less with siblings. The results of research in which peers are included in the intervention has been promising and overall positive, but it is unclear now how involving siblings could potentially impact gains for these students. The current study investigated the benefits of a brief training session provided to siblings of children who use AAC devices while at a Theater Camp for families of students who use AAC devices. The purpose was to determine if the training session impacted siblings’ interactions and confidence communicating with users of AAC devices as measured by pre- and post-training questionnaires. Data regarding the amount of training that siblings had received prior to attending this session and the social validity of the training was collected. The study identifies a need for further research in the area of training and mentor programs for siblings of students who use AAC devices.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to recognize the importance of educating families of students with complex communication needs and associated tools (i.e. augmentative or alternative communication), identify the benefits of including siblings, family and peers in intervention with students who use AAC devices, integrate and utilize strategies for sibling and peer involvement with students who use AAC devices.

Level of Learning: Introductory

ST 18 - Thickening Liquids for Dysphagic Infants: Achieving and Maintaining Safe Viscosities

Elizabeth Bier, University of Missouri; Dani Lake, University of Missouri Supervisor: Teresa Lever PhD University of Missouri

In 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned against the use of standardized xanthan gum-based thickeners (e.g., SimplyThick) with infants. Since then, clinicians have resorted to using grain cereals as a thickening agent for infant formula or breast milk; however, standardized recipes have not been established. We are therefore investigating rheologic properties of infant formula and breast milk with various grain cereals added. Using a Haake viscometer, we have begun characterizing the viscosity of daily bottle feedings routinely used at our facility, typically a 3:1 ratio of liquid to grain cereal. Preliminary findings of room temperature solutions have been tested thus far. Preliminary findings suggest more than 5 mL of single grain rice cereal is needed to achieve a true nectar consistency viscosity with 19 and 22 calorie formulas, while less than 5 mL of single grain oat cereal is needed for 24 calorie formula. In addition, we have found that breast milk thickened with grain cereal quickly falls from nectar to thin viscosity soon after mixing (~5 minutes). The safest recipe identified thus far is breast milk mixed with 22 calorie formula and oat cereal, which remained within the nectar consistency range for only nine minutes. Based on these results, we are now interrupting bottle feedings every nine minutes to provide a fresh mixture until the 30-minute feeding limit is reached. Our next step is to identify recipes that provide a stable thickened formula or breastmilk to the target nectar and honey viscosities for an entire 30-minute bottle-feeding duration.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to recognize the difficulties in treating aspiration in infants using thickened formulas or breast milk, explain the differentiating rate at which each thickening agent paired with formula or breast milk thickens or thins over time, translate these preliminary findings into their practices with infants who have dysphagia.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

ST 19 - Word Complexity Effects on Tongue Motor Control

Claire Custer, MA, University of Missouri; Victoria Moss, BS, University of Missouri; Paulina Simon, BS, University of Missouri Supervisor: Mili Kuruvilla PhD University of Missouri

Current dysarthria tests provide an overall index of severity but are insensitive to articulatory impairments, which makes the detection and tracking of dysarthria progression difficult. To improve dysarthria assessment, speech stimuli that test a wide range of articulatory skills need to be included in assessments so clinicians can accurately track articulatory decline and dysarthria progression. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of word complexity on articulatory movements in talkers with dysarthria. Seven individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 15 healthy controls were asked to produce 10 repetitions of 32 words that required a range of articulatory skills as indexed by their phonetic-articulatory complexity. 3D electromagnetic articulography (NDI Inc., Ontario, Canada) was used to record tongue movements via markers affixed to the tongue tip and back. Motion trajectories of the tongue sensors during multiple repetitions of each word were used to calculate movement variability which serves as an estimate of tongue motor control. A custom-written MATLAB tool was used to compute variability using the speech transmission index (STI) measure (Smith et al., 1995). Talkers with mild-moderate dysarthria showed increased control (low STI scores) over their tongue movements in response to increased phonetic complexity. In contrast, those with severe dysarthria showed decreased control (high STI scores) with increased stimuli demands. Regardless of severity, STI differences between the ALS and control groups increased as word complexity increased. Therefore, considering phonetic complexity in the selection of test stimuli may result in more sensitive tools for the assessment of articulatory decline.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list the benefits of including phonetic complexity as a factor in dysarthria assessments, state the effects of phonetic complexity on tongue movement variability in speakers with ALS and healthy controls, explain the method for collecting kinematic data to capture tongue movement variability.

Level of Learning: Introductory

ST 20 - Clear Speech Effects on Jaw Motor Control

Abby Isabelle, BS, University of Missouri; Adrienne Cameron, University of Missouri; Erin Nichols, University of Missouri, Natalie Terbrock, University of Missouri, Haley Harding, University of Missouri Supervisor: Mili Kuruvilla-Dugdale PhD University of Missouri

Clear speech, a treatment strategy characterized by exaggerated articulatory movements, may have a significant positive impact on improving speech intelligibility in individuals with dysarthria. However, few studies have evaluated clear speech effects at the articulatory kinematic level. Our aim was to determine if clear speech benefits jaw motor control in people with dysarthria due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A 3D electromagnetic articulograph (NDI Inc., Canada) was used to record jaw movements via two mandibular sensors (3x3mm) from seven people with ALS and 14 healthy controls. Participants repeated the target sentence “I owe you a yoyo” 10 times consecutively using habitual and clear speech. For each speech condition, the displacement trajectories of the jaw markers were used to estimate spatiotemporal movement variability using the Speech Transmission Index (STI) measure (Smith et al., 1995). STI is a widely-used metric of jaw motor control that captures movement variability over repetitions of an utterance. Low STI values indicate movement consistency (i.e., sophisticated motor control) and can be expected if clear speech is beneficial at the kinematic level. An Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significantly greater jaw STI scores for the ALS group during clear speech compared to habitual speech as well as relative to the controls. Therefore, clear speech may be a motorically unstable mode of communication partly because it is accompanied by a slower speaking rate which is known to destabilize the articulatory motor system. This kinematic finding does not preclude the possibility that there may be clear speech benefits at the acoustic and/or auditory-perceptual levels.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the effects of clear speech on jaw motor control in patients with ALS, describe when, how and with which clinical populations clear speech may be an effective treatment strategy, summarize the procedure of collecting articulatory kinematic data to capture jaw movement variability.

Level of Learning: Introductory

ST 21 - The Impact of Extracurricular Activity Participation on Speech-Language Impaired Children

Emily Barton-Maher, BA, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Lynne Shields PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F Fontbonne University

Research has shown that participation in sports during childhood and adolescence has many benefits for children and youth, namely a decreased school dropout rate, lower levels of depression, increased academic performance and increased social competence. Of the research done in this area, no mention is made as to whether or not the populations studied contain children with speech and/or language disorders. Moreover, there are no studies in the literature that look specifically at children with speech and language disorders to determine what benefits, if any, they gain from participation in a broader range of extracurricular activities. This session aims to fill this gap by looking in particular at social competence skills in relation to participation or non-participation in structured extracurricular activities amongst a population of children ages eight to 11 years with and without speech and/or language disorders. Data was gathered for this study via parent survey regarding familial demographic information, the child’s extracurricular activity participation, the presence or lack thereof of a speech and/or language disorder and a rating scale of perceived social competence.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the importance of middle childhood on social skill development, describe the gap in the research in regards to the effects of extracurricular activity participation in children with speech and/or language disorders, state the impact structured extracurricular activity participation has on children with speech and/or language disorders in comparison to typical peers.

Level of Learning: Introductory

ST 22 - Comparison of Guardian and Teacher Report With EHS Screening Results

Sarah Ostermiller, Truman State University; Leah Bell, Truman State University Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, CCC-A, Truman State University; Janet Gooch PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

All children ages birth to 36 months in the Early Head Start (EHS) program are required to be screened for hearing and language. These screenings allow for children at risk for communication disorders to be enrolled in intervention as quickly as possible. Guardians and teachers are the most knowledgeable regarding the abilities of their children. A new guardian and teacher questionnaire were created and given to the caretaker and teacher, respectively, to be filled out prior to the screening appointment. The researcher compared the speech and language abilities reported by the surveys with the score of the ELM-2. The goal of this study was to see where the discrepancies were between the screening results and survey responses so that changes can be made to the screening process. This information will allow the Truman Speech and Hearing Clinic to improve the reliability of screenings administered to the EHS population.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to define what Early Head Start is and the requirements for the program, recall the EHS screening process at Truman State University Speech and Hearing Clinic, summarize the method of teacher education used when distributibg the surveys.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

ST 23 - Utilizing Cognitive Behavior Therapy in the Treatment of Developmental Stuttering

Katie Easler, BS, University of Central Missouri Supervisor: Greg Turner PhD, CCC-SLP University of Central Missouri

The aim of this session presentation is to describe the application of Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) techniques to target unhelpful thoughts and beliefs in an adult with a diagnosis of advanced stuttering. Normalizing attitudes toward communication is key to successful outcomes in adults who stutter (Guitar & Bass, 1978). Menzies, Onslow, Packman & O’Brian (2009) indicate challenging negative beliefs and judgements through cognitive restructuring and behavioral experiments is critical to treatment success for adults who stutter. CBT is responsible for reduction in severity of stuttering, decreasing dysfunctional cognitions, enhancing assertiveness and improving quality of life (Reddy, Sharma, & Shivashankar, 2010). The case study will focus on the assessment and treatment procedures targeting the reduction of unhelpful thoughts and beliefs about stuttering as one part of a comprehensive treatment program. Findings indicated clinically significant reductions in the frequency of unhelpful thoughts and beliefs claimed by the participant at the end of one semester (i.e., 12 weeks) of treatment. These findings will be compared to previous studies adopting similar therapeutic techniques. Limitations of the study along with future directions for research will be discussed.

The aim of this session presentation is to describe the application of Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) techniques to target unhelpful thoughts and beliefs in an adult with a diagnosis of advanced stuttering. Normalizing attitudes toward communication is key to successful outcomes in adults who stutter (Guitar & Bass, 1978). Menzies, Onslow, Packman & O’Brian (2009) indicate challenging negative beliefs and judgements through cognitive restructuring and behavioral experiments is critical to treatment success for adults who stutter. CBT is responsible for reduction in severity of stuttering, decreasing dysfunctional cognitions, enhancing assertiveness and improving quality of life (Reddy, Sharma, & Shivashankar, 2010). The case study will focus on the assessment and treatment procedures targeting the reduction of unhelpful thoughts and beliefs about stuttering as one part of a comprehensive treatment program. Findings indicated clinically significant reductions in the frequency of unhelpful thoughts and beliefs claimed by the participant at the end of one semester (i.e., 12 weeks) of treatment. These findings will be compared to previous studies adopting similar therapeutic techniques. Limitations of the study along with future directions for research will be discussed.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

ST 24 - Training Impact Volunteer Experience When Working With Impoverished Families

Rose Hatting, Truman State University; Lorrin McBee, Truman State University Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger AuD, CCC-A Truman State University

The purpose of this study is to understand if provision of training and education will increase knowledge, comfort and perceived value of volunteer experience when working with families living in poverty.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe two ways poverty impacts families in the United States, define a high impact student experience, list two components of a training program for students who are volunteering with families living in poverty.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Poster Sessions

Friday 5:30 pm - 8:30 pm

SP 1 - Predictive Factors of Emergent Literacy Skills of Preschoolers

Rachel Wright, BS, Southeast Missouri State University Supervisor: Kevin Squibb, PhD, CCC-A, Southeast Missouri State University

The purpose of this study was to determine possible predictive factors on the pre-literacy skills of twenty four- and five-year-old preschoolers all of whom attend a preschool program in the Midwest. Participants were randomly and evenly divided into an experimental and control group based on gender and cognitive ability. The research questions addressed in this project included: Does participation in phonological awareness intervention affect the pre-literacy skills of preschoolers (as measured by the CTOPP-2 and TERA-3)? Does cognitive ability (as measured by the KBIT-2) affect pre-literacy skills? Does receptive and expressive language ability (as measured by the CELF-Preschool-2) affect pre-literacy skills? Does the amount of exposure to letters and numbers and level of interest in letters and numbers in the home (as measured by a parent questionnaire) and school environment (as measured by a teacher questionnaire) affect pre-literacy skills? Pre-tests were administered to each participant in the areas of phonological awareness, cognition, receptive and expressive language, and early reading ability. Participants in the experimental group participated in an eight week phonological awareness intervention program focusing on classic children’s literature, while the control group participated in activities not pertaining to phonological awareness. The activities completed included: counting words, supplying a word as an adult reads, syllable deleting, syllable adding, sound matching, blending sounds in words, rhyming and identifying colors, letters and objects. All participants were administered post-tests in the areas of phonological awareness and early reading ability. Results will be presented and discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to summarize the effects of phonological awareness intervention on pre-literacy skills, describe the differences between groups, identify the components of phonological awareness.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 2 - Phonological Awareness Intervention in Preschoolers

Claire Goodson, BS, Southeast Missouri State University Supervisor: Marcia Brown-Haims, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of phonological awareness training on the pre-literacy skills of twenty four- and five-year-old preschoolers. The participants all attend a preschool affiliated with a local university in the Midwest. The research questions addressed in this project include the following: is there a significant difference in the pre-literacy skills (as measured by the CTOPP-2) of preschoolers who participate in phonological awareness intervention when compared to preschoolers who received no phonological awareness intervention, and is there significant improvement in the syllable segmentation, sound segmentation, sound manipulation, rhyming and/or syllable/ sound blending skills of preschoolers who have participated in a phonological awareness intervention program? The participants were pre-tested and post-tested using the Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processes 2nd Edition (CTOPP-2.) The intervention program used eight classic children’s literature stories such as Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Jack and the Beanstalk and Little Red Riding Hood, as the basis for each lesson. The activities completed include: counting words, identifying missing word from list, syllable counting, sound matching, blending sounds in words, identifying all sounds in words and deleting sounds within words. Differences between the groups will be presented and discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the components of phonological awareness, summarize the effects of phonological awareness intervention on pre-literacy skills, describe the differences between groups.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 3 - Perception of AAC/AT Device Use and QOL in Older Adults

Katie LaRue, BS, Southeast Missouri State University Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

Older adults residing in long-term care facilities are required to interact with staff and family members on a day-to-day basis in order to meet their communication needs. Efficient communication leads to perception of higher quality of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the perception of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device and assistive technology (AT) device use and quality of life in older adults. The research questions in the study are: what types of AAC devices are used in long-term care facilities; what types of AT devices are used in long-term care facilities; what are the benefits perceived by users of the AAC/AT devices in long-term care facilities; and how does the use of the AAC/AT device affect perceived quality of life among older adults? Twenty residents of long-term care facilities responded to items on a questionnaire regarding the type of AAC/AT device used and the benefits received from the use of the device. A survey about perceived quality of life was also completed by each participant. Descriptive as well as correlational analysis will be performed to determine the effects of communication with AAC/AT devices on quality of life.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list the types AAC/AT devices used in long-term care facilities, describe the perception of benefits of AAC/AT devices by residents, describe the effects of use of AAC/AT device on perceived quality of life by residents.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 4 - Exploring Alternative Receptive Vocabulary Scoring Sensitive to Partial Word Knowledge

Kelsey Cahalan, University of Missouri Supervisor: Stacy Wagovich, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

Formal measures of vocabulary are useful for determining the breadth of one’s vocabulary, but they are often criticized for neglecting the depth of one’s understanding of a word. One way to examine depth of understanding is to measure partial understandings of words. For example, a child may not be able to identify a picture of a llama but may know that a llama is an animal. The purpose of this study is to explore children’s receptive responses on a formal measure of one-word vocabulary, examining the extent to which traditional scoring methods versus methods sensitive to partial word knowledge correspond to the children’s performance on a word learning task. Children (N=32) ranged in age from ten to sixteen and varied widely in their overall language abilities. Related to this study, they completed a receptive vocabulary measure and read two stories three times each. Stories contained rare, presumably unfamiliar words on which the children were tested after each reading. This procedure resulted in an overall word learning score. Research questions focused on whether awarding credit for partial receptive vocabulary knowledge (by developing new raw scores and statistically controlling for age) corresponded more strongly than the traditional receptive vocabulary raw scores to children’s word learning performance. Analyses are currently underway. Findings will address whether more sensitive receptive vocabulary measurement would be useful in predicting children’s active word learning through reading.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the importance of taking into account partial word knowledge in assessing a child’s development of language, in general, contrast methods of traditional receptive vocabulary measurement, compared to partial word knowledge-sensitive measurement, summarize key findings as they relate to our understanding of vocabulary measurement and children’s word learning.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 5 - Development of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Resources

Candice Heaton, BS, Missouri State University Supervisor: Lisa Proctor, PhD, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University

The purpose of this student project was to gather and compile a range of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) resources. The resources were developed to assist graduate clinicians and speech- language pathologists in providing services to persons with complex communication needs (CNN). Individuals with CNN who require the use of an AAC system are a heterogenous group and consequently the AAC systems and strategies implemented are numerous and varied. Age, communication level, physical and cognitive impairment and other factors directly affect the choice of AAC to be used with an individual. This project involved compiling resources for specific areas of AAC and specific populations who use AAC. The poster will review the methods used to gather and compile the resources as well as the completed resources. These resources include information on AAC for individuals with aphasia, AAC for beginning communicators, AAC assessment, AAC funding, Language through Motor Planning (LAMP), AAC applications and AAC resources in Spanish. The poster will discuss plans to use the materials to preparing graduate clinicians in use of AAC in therapy and acquiring AAC knowledge for their future careers.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify AAC assessments and questionnaires available for use during evaluations and therapy, list five different funding sources available for AAC devices, identify four types of low tech AAC devices used to increase receptive and expressive language skills for individual's with aphasia.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 6 - Interprofessional Partnerships Between SLPs and OTs: Strategies for Preservice Training

Mackenzie Weis, BS, Missouri State University Supervisor: Lisa Proctor, PhD, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University

The purpose of this student project was to research successful strategies for expanding speech-language pathology (SLP) graduate students ability to successfully collaborate with occupational therapists (OTs). SLPs are expected to take a holistic approach to assessment and intervention and to form partnerships with parents, educators and other related professionals (Coufal, 1993). However, preservice SLPs may have limited formal education regarding working on inter-professional teams (Morrison, Lincoln, & Reed, 2001) The purpose of this project was to research current practices in inter-professional collaborations with an emphasis on collaborations between SLPs and OTs. The poster will provide a research review related to SLP graduate students’ knowledge of occupational therapy as well as current practices in inter-professional preservice training for SLPs. In addition, survey responses from SLP graduate students who, via course activities, participated in inter-professional activates will be presented. Future research and educational implications regarding inter-professional development in preservice training will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the need for inter-professional collaboration among health care professionals, state the occupational therapist’s role in AAC services, identify the scope of practice of occupational therapists.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 7 - Melodic Intervention Effects in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Emily McLeod, BS, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Laura O'Hara, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

Research has found that music based intervention can be used to engage and strengthen connections between brain regions associated with motor, auditory, speech and language (Wan & Schlaug, 2010). It has been reported that structural differences are present in language-related regions in children with autism spectrum disorder compared to control groups of individuals. The human brain is capable of reorganization in response to environmental demands. Music training is an intense, multisensory motor experience that incorporates auditory feedback in improving sensorimotor skills and also promotes plasticity changes in the brain. This poster will discuss the anatomical structural differences of the brain in children with autism spectrum disorder. This poster will also discuss the different melodic based interventions that can be implemented in therapy.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to understand the anatomical structural differences of the brain in children with autism spectrum disorder, describe the different types of melodic based interventions that can be implanted in therapy, interpret research pertaining to melodic-based intervention for improving speech and language skills in children with autism spectrum disorder.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 8 - Efficacy of Family-Centered Care

Melissa Kelley, BA, Rockhurst University; Elizabeth Bayliss, BS, Rockhurst University; Emma Lee, BS, Rockhurst University Supervisor: Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

The purpose of this systematic review is to determine whether applying one or more components of family-centered care (FCC) to service delivery will improve outcomes and perceptions for children and parents. Articles were included if they met the following inclusion criteria: parents of children birth to 18 years, children with a congenital or acquired medical diagnoses, contact with a healthcare provider, and at least one aspect of FCC in service delivery. Articles were acquired through database searches and secondhand hand searches and analyzed for quality, components of FCC and levels of evidence. Results suggested that incorporating one or more of the four components of FCC into practice would help improve both parent satisfaction and outcomes of interventions. The results also showed that professionals often rate themselves lower on FCC scores than did parents, and parents and professionals shared differing views in what component of FCC was most important. Implementing one or more FCC components often resulted in better outcomes and perceptions of service delivery for children. Further research is needed to investigate FCC’s impact on different populations and environments.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify core principles of family-centered care, identify one to two ways in which family-centered care can impact treatment provided by an SLP, recall at least one way in which family-centered care perceptions differed between professionals and caregivers.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 9 - Evaluation and Treatment of Speech Disorders Associated With Cleft Palate

Hannah Kinder, BS, University of Missouri; Angela Colletta, BS Ed, BA, University of Missouri Supervisor: Anne Bedwinek, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

ASHA Special Interest Group 5, Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, Continuing Education Committee, offers this poster as a practical review of assessment and management approaches for speech disorders associated with cleft palate and/or velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD). Evidence-based treatment and collaboration between the SLP and the Cleft Palate Team are emphasized.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify and describe the three types of velopharyngeal dysfunction (VP insufficiency, VP incompetency, and VP mislearning), describe the obligatory speech features of VPD and differentiate these from compensatory articulation errors associated with VPD, describe three types of speech treatment strategies to address compensatory articulation errors in children with repaired cleft palate or VPD.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 10 - Collaborative Intensive English Program at the University of Central Missouri

Jade Collins, BS, University of Central Missouri; Laura Kiser, BS, University of Central Missouri; Victoria Talley, BS, University of Central Missouri Supervisor: Carlotta Kimble, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri

The Intensive English Program (IEP) at the University of Central Missouri is a collaborative venture between the English Language Program and the Communication Disorders Program. IEP provides intensive accent modification therapy for international students attending UCM via bi-weekly 50 minute group therapy sessions during an eight week period.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to state the goals of the Intensive English Program at UCM, define some key terms associated with accent reduction, identify common speech sound errors of international students based on native language.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 11 - Intellectual Giftedness in Children and African American Vernacular English

Ivy McDermott, University of Central Missouri; Emma McLean, University of Central Missouri Supervisor: Carlotta Kimble, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri

The academic achievement of highly intellectual African American children may be overlooked. This is often due to their use of African American Vernacular English (AAVE) rather than Standard American English (SAE). This presentation will examine various studies that researched identification methods used for determining level of intellectual giftedness in African American children in primary and secondary education. The purpose of this presentation is to propose effective methods which prevent dialectal bias in educators and other professionals who evaluate African American children.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify specific assessment tools that would be culturally appropriate to use for African American children, state identification methods used for determining level of intellectual giftedness in African American children, state common dialectal biases that may be found in evaluating African American individuals.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 12 - Practical Reading Comprehension Strategies for Children With Specific Language Impairment

Julia Gust, BS, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Gale Rice, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

Children with specific language impairment typically have difficulties in the areas of decoding and reading comprehension. Decoding skills are much easier to identify in children with specific language impairment than reading comprehension skills, and many speech-language pathologists are familiar with strategies to use with students who have difficulties with decoding. Because reading comprehension deficits are not as obvious, many speech-language pathologists are not as familiar with reading comprehension strategies and as a result, children with reading comprehension difficulties fall behind their peers in literacy and do not receive support. This poster presents practical, evidenced-based reading comprehension strategies that can be used when working with children with specific language impairment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to distinguish between reading difficulties associated with decoding and reading difficulties associated with comprehension, explain why children with specific language impairment and specifically have difficulty with reading comprehension often fall behind their peers in the area of literacy, identify strategies that can be used to address reading comprehension in children with specific language impairment.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 13 - Tactile vs Verbal Prompts for Production of S-Blends

Courtney Simross, BA, Truman State University Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

The purpose of this study was to compare the benefits of using tactile prompts and verbal prompts when providing articulation therapy for s-blends for a child with Down syndrome. This study was an A B+C alternating design consisting of two phases: baseline and treatment. Data was collected based on the client's ability to produce initial /st/, /sp/, and /sn/ blends in the context of single words. During the treatment phase, tactile and verbal prompts were implemented and counterbalanced each session. Tactile prompts included pointing to tongue placement and using a tactile cuing board. Verbal prompts included phonemic placement cues and over emphasis. Results indicated that the use of tactile prompts increased the client's accuracy in the production of s-blends in single words.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe a single-subject alternating treatment design that allows clinicians to document treatment efficacy, identify whether or not the treatment described was helpful to the client, explain how tactile and verbal prompts were used with a client and how the client's response to treatment was measured.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 14 - The Effect of Pictured Letters on Oral Reading of Words

Jennifer Yerganian, BS, Truman State University Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

This research study explored the use of “pictured letters” from the Laubach Way to Reading program to determine if it could help an elementary aged child with specific language impairment and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder better learn to decode CVC words. The study was conducted using an ABAB Single-Subject Research Design. The researcher first gathered baseline on the subject reading two-syllable CVC words. Each word had one of the targeted letters in it; k, m, or p, either at the beginning or end. She then introduced the picture letters; pictures that represented an object or action corresponding to the targeted letter (ex: a picture of a man kicking in the shape of the letter k). The picture letters stood in for the letter they represent in the word list. The researcher collected data on how this affected the subject’s accuracy in decoding, while reading the words on the word list. Following this, treatment was withdrawn and data was collected. This research can contribute to the use of pictured letters as a decoding strategy for children with specific language impairment and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe ABAB withdrawal single subject design used in this study that allows clinicians to document treatment efficacy, identify whether or not the treatment described was helpful to the client, explain how pictured letters were used with a client and how the client's response to treatment was measured.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 15 - Maternal Education: The Divergence of Children’s Destinies

Heather McCrory, BS, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Barbara Meyer, MA, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

The purpose of this poster presentation is to inform the listener about the modes of prevention, evaluation, and intervention for children with at-risk backgrounds, and how professionals can help to improve their academic potential. The current research included in the presentation will provide the listener with factual information regarding children from mothers who have a variety of educational levels and their projected intellectual trajectory. The information includes the areas that are deficient in low socioeconomic status groups compared to the proficiency in higher socioeconomic groups, and ways to bridge the gap.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to contrast the academic characteristics of students from differing socioeconomic backgrounds, explain the importance of maternal education and how it indirectly affects a child’s academic success, identify the risk factors contributing to the academic divide of children with different socioeconomic backgrounds.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 16 - Dysphagia and the Effects on Quality of Life

Fairen Rayball, BS, Rockhurst University; Abigail Jensen, BS, Rockhurst University Supervisor: Barbara Meyer, MA, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

The purpose of this systematic review is to examine the effects of dysphagia on quality of life of individuals with neurological health conditions. A comprehensive web based search was conducted to identify peer-reviewed articles between 2000 and 2016. In addition, hand searches were carried out across applicable texts. An appraisal of quality was conducted for sources meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria. The review identified a total of six articles, involving 181 participants with a diagnosis of a dysphagia secondary to a neurological health condition. All six articles documented that individuals experienced decreased quality of life as a result of a diagnosis of dysphagia. Despite the specific nature of the neurological disease or disorder, quality of life is negatively affected when there is a diagnosis of dysphagia. Although there is a connection between dysphagia and a decreased quality of life, more research is necessary to determine the importance of this connection.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to define dysphagia and quality of life, recognize impaired psychosocial behaviors as a result of dysphagia, identify and discuss the relationship between dysphagia and decreased quality of life.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 17 - TBI in Adults: A Comparative Case Study of Treatment Methods

Mattisyn Perak, BA, St. Louis University Supervisor: Mitzi Brammer, PhD, CCC-SLP, St. Louis University

Adults surviving a traumatic brain injury (TBI) often live with a chronic disability, which can manifest itself cognitively, behaviorally and physically. Speech and language are among areas most commonly affected due to cognitive impairments. Memory deficits, post-traumatic attention and disturbances in executive functioning not only affect the cognitive abilities in an individual after sustaining a TBI, but are apparent in a client’s pragmatic language behaviors as well. Clinicians and relatives of those who suffered a TBI often report over-talkativeness, fragmented speech, self-centeredness, insensitivity, disinterest in others, childishness and inappropriate behaviors associated with personality changes. Social interactions are a challenge, especially with severe TBIs (McDonald et al., 2014). The type of speech-language impairment that results from TBI depends on the location and severity of the injury sustained. According to Barman, Chatterjee, and Bhide (2016) individuals with a cognitive communication disorder may have reduced emotion when communicating, and problems with language processing and word finding. Impairments in social interactions often lead to frustrating or embarrassing experiences for TBI patients, which is why speech-language pathologists often target pragmatic language behaviors in therapy. The purpose of this study is to complete a comparative analysis of three adult clients diagnosed with TBI. Each client’s case represents a different facet of TBI regarding location of damage as well as specific types of communication skills impacted (particularly pragmatic language skills). Examining these case studies will allow speech-language pathologists to understand the evidence-based practice involved in planning, implementing and evaluating cognitive-linguistic therapy.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe at least one therapeutic approach that could be used in adult patients with TBI, identify variables in the selection of therapeutic methodologies for TBI, discuss implications for cognitive/linguistic therapy as it relates to TBI.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 18 - Perceptions of Telepractice in Schools: Experienced vs. Novice Speech-Language Pathologists

Elizabeth Kreipe, BS, Southeast Missouri State University Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

The purpose of the study is to investigate the knowledge, skills, attitudes and beliefs of experienced speech–language pathologists compared to novice speech-language pathologists in regard to the use of telepractice in the school setting. This study used a convenience sample of school speech-language pathologists recruited from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association who completed a survey pertaining to their knowledge, skills, attitudes and beliefs on telepractice. Results will be presented and differences between the groups will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe essential elements of telepractice, distinguish the attitudes and beliefs about telepractice of experienced speech-language pathologists compared to novice speech-language pathologists, identify differences in knowledge of telepractice between experienced speech-language pathologists and novice speech-language pathologists.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 19 - Risk Factors to Indicate Language Outcomes in Language-Delayed Toddlers

Gwen Sabo, BS, Fontbonne University, Demi Blust, BA, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

Research has shown that early risk factors for children who have early language delays can predict later language outcomes (Paul & Roth, 2011). This poster is designed to investigate the risk factors that can lead to chronic language difficulties. It will also present target skills that are important to integrate into treatment for toddlers with language delays. Finally, it will discuss how executive functioning can predict language outcomes in children with early language delays.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to configure risk factors in children that may lead to lasting language difficulties, integrate target skills into treatment for toddlers with language delays, assess the effects that executive functioning skills can have on language outcomes in children with language delays.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Saturday 7:00 am - 8:00 am

SP 20 - Voice-Related Quality of Life in Teachers

Rachel Wright, BS, Southeast Missouri State University; Mallorie Renth, BS, Southeast Missouri State University; Katie Kaufman, BS, Southeast Missouri State University Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

The purpose of this poster is to conduct a descriptive review of the published studies that were undertaken to measure voice-related quality of life (VRQoL) in teachers. The results of self-perception of VRQoL by teachers will be analyzed based on item analysis of the commonly reported voice problems, socio-emotional problems and communication issues that tend to interfere with occupational tasks, professional duties and personal lives.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list various tools to measure voice-related quality of life in teachers, identify and define the nature of vocal problems that interfere with multiple dimensions of quality of life, describe content validity and reliability of the tools for measuring voice-related quality of life.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 21 - Voice-Related Quality of Life in Singers

Elizabeth Kreipe, BS, Southeast Missouri State University; Megan Rush, BS, Southeast Missouri State University; Hannah Netherland, BS, Southeast Missouri State University; Olivia Richardson, BS, Southeast Missouri State University; Amy Shell, Southeast Missouri State University; Nicole Reyes, BS, Southeast Missouri State University Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

Overall quality of life in singers is dependent on vocal functions in daily tasks. Specific artistic demands of voice in singers require high levels of vocal agility, strength and endurance to cope with repeated execution of complex vocal fold movements. Singers are known to experience emotional distress due to deviations in singing voice caused by a myriad of factors such as allergies, laryngopharyngeal reflux, vocal strain, prolonged vocal use, adverse environments and so on. The purpose of the paper was to examine various factors that lead to the perception of compromised quality of life due to vocal stress in singers, based on a systematic review of literature. Various QoL protocols/measures for singers will be reviewed for construct validity. The use of protocols/measures for voice symptoms and singing handicap has revealed the possibility of singers to present risky vocal behaviors.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list various factors that affect voice-related quality of life in singers, list various protocols/measures that can be used to examine voice-related quality of life in singers, identify and define the nature of vocal problems during singing and speaking that impact the overall quality of life.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 22 - Vocal Health in Singers

Kristen Bowling, BS, Southeast Missouri State University; Claire Goodson, BS, Southeast Missouri State University; Katie LaRue, BS, Southeast Missouri State University; Mackenzie Housman, BS, Southeast Missouri State University; Tiffany Morgan, BS, Southeast Missouri State University Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

Singers often experience vocal challenges that lead to poor performance, laryngeal discomfort and emotional stress and anxiety. Studies indicate that education about vocal health and physiology can help singers avoid the development of vocal disorders. The purpose of this study was to describe the amount of instruction needed for singers in the areas of vocal hygiene for optimal singing and speaking behaviors. This warrants for more collaboration between speech-language pathologists, vocal pedagogues and medical professionals in the education of singers on vocal health.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify and define the nature of vocal problems in singers, list various vocal physiology-based strategies that lead to enhanced vocal health in singers, describe various evidence-based alternative medicines that impact vocal health in singers.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 23 - Prevention of Dysphagia in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

Allison Clayton, BS, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Amanda Alton, MS, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

Oropharyngeal dysphagia is common among patients with head and neck cancers. Radiotherapy and chemoradiation can cause acute and chronic dysphagia. Patients frequently need non-oral means of nutrition to adequately maintain nutrition and hydration. Non-oral means of nutrition however, can negatively impact the patients’ quality of life. Therefore, contemporary interventions are focused on dysphagia prevention. Specifically, prophylactic swallowing exercises and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are among the two most effective dysphagia prevention methods (Narayanasamy, 2015; Van Djik, 2016; Starmer, 2014; Patterson, 2016). Peng et al. (2015), developed a swallow preservation protocol for patients with head and neck cancer. Results indicate that introducing and implementing swallowing exercises prior to chemoradiation and radiation yields a decrease in dysphagia occurrence. Paleri et al. (2013), evaluated strategies to reduce chronic dysphagia resulting from head and neck cancer. Results emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary and individualized approach in dysphagia treatment. The aim of this poster is to review the current literature regarding head and neck cancer dysphagia prevention. Recommendations for evidenced based practice and future research directions will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the aspects of dysphagia in quality of life, describe dysphagia prevention techniques for head and neck cancers, identify how IMRT can affect swallowing function.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 24 - Parents Perceptions of Their Prelinguistic Child's Screen Exposure

Ellie Pope, St. Louis University Supervisor: Debroah Hwa-Froelich, PhD, CCC-SLP, St. Louis University

The use of technology is increasing at a rate higher than our society has ever seen before. Although significant progress and achievements have been made based on these advancements, there is less information to be found about its negative effects. These effects, specifically on infants, are of particular concern due to the importance of their rapid development from birth. This qualitative study focuses on parent reported infant (nine-24 months) exposure to technology (TV, computer, smartphone, tablet). Two research questions will be analyzed in order to conduct a successful study: What are parents’ beliefs about exposing children to technology and how often do parents report that their infants are directly or indirectly exposed to technology? These questions will give insight into how parents’ beliefs are aligned with their frequency counts of their infant’s indirect and direct exposure to screen use. Participants will be interviewed using ethnographic interviewing methods, tally the number of times their infant is exposed to screen based technology over seven days, and take part in a follow-up interview. Although the results are still pending, it is projected that prelinguistic children’s screen exposure will reflect the rest of the population's use of it.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe negative aspects of exposure to screen based technology, discuss parents awareness of children's screen exposure, discuss clinical implications of children's screen exposure on language learning.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 25 - How Visualization Increases Reading Comprehension

Denise Addis, BS, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Barbara Meyer, MA, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

The ability to read and understand what has been read is critical to students in their academic careers as well as in their daily lives. Visualization is a strategy used to increase reading comprehension. This poster explains how reading comprehension is affected by visualization, different methods of teaching students to visualize and how to enhance student visualizations. This poster provides guidelines to improve and build on students’ visualizations. Students who have been taught how to create mental images while reading tend to have better recall and understanding of the text.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify how the ability to visualize increases reading comprehension, describe specific strategies SLPs use to enhance visualizations in students, apply visualization strategies with students having reading comprehension difficulties.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 26 - Targeting Early Language and Emergent Literacy in Communities

Jessica Catlett, University of Central Missouri Supervisor: Kimberly Stewart, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri

This poster presentation will feature the early language and emergent literacy activities that are being implemented by the Communication Disorders Program in Warrensburg, Missouri, and how speech-language pathologists and students can implement comparable programs in their own communities. Information about obtaining sponsors and funding for literacy programs will be provided. Collaboration with various agencies and interested groups will be featured. Home literacy programs and parent training will be supplied.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify needs for early language and emergent literacy enrichment programs in communities, name resources available to aid in funding of early language and emergent literacy efforts, describe collaborations with Head Start, Parents as Teachers and various entities that support the development of early language and emergent literacy.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 27 - Literacy Challenges in Students With ADHD: Instruction Considerations for SLPs

Andrea Crow, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Amanda Alton, MS, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common diagnosed psychological disorder of childhood, affecting 5 per cent to 8 per cent of children between the ages of six and 17 years old (Pastor & Reuben, 2008). Academic underachievement, particularly in the areas of reading and writing, is common among students with ADHD. Research suggests that self-regulation may be a key behavior that contributes to academic performance. Self-regulation includes three essential components: inhibition, attention and organization and motivation. Specifically, students with ADHD have significantly greater difficulty during reading comprehension tasks with high cognitive demands such as selective and sustained attention, inhibitory control and working memory (WM) (Borella, Carretti, & Pelegrina, 2010). On measures of text composition, children with ADHD produce a significantly greater number of syntactic errors (e.g. omission of articles, prepositions, or conjunctions), use less diverse vocabulary and exhibit difficulty planning and revising their writing when compared to typically developing peers. This poster will review characteristics of reading/writing deficits in learners with ADHD as well as intervention strategies.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify characteristics of reading comprehension in school-aged children with ADHD, identify characteristics of written composition in school-aged children with ADHD, list strategies to support reading comprehension in school-aged children with ADHD.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 28 - The Effects of Visual Cue Cards on Conversational Turn Taking

Taylor Flanagan, BA, Truman State University Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

The purpose of this study was to research the effect of visual cue cards on conversational turn-taking. Therefore, will the subject appropriately participate in conversation more or less with the use of visual cue cards? The project was a single subject withdrawal design (A-B-A-B). The independent variable was the using or not using of a visual cue card and the dependent variable was the appropriate participation of using questions, comments or nothing. Baseline data (A) was collected to establish a stable response pattern. Next, during treatment phase 1 (B), a timer was set for five minutes during which time visual cue cards were provided to the subject as a reminder to ask questions and comment during conversation. The researcher also used a verbal cue and /or gestural cue as another reminder. After the timer went off the researcher provided no more prompts but the visual cue cards remained available. Conversation was held for another ten minutes. Then treatment was withdrawn (A) and conversations were had without the use of the visual cue cards. Last, treatment phase 2 (B) took place. The same process during treatment phase 1 was applied. Results showed that the visual cue cards did improve the subject's use of conversational turn taking.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the ABAB single subject design used in this study that allows clinicians to document treatment efficacy, identify whether or not the treatment described in this session was helpful to the client, explain how visual cue cards were used with a client and how the client's response to treatment was measured.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 29 - Student Teachers’ Voices: Does Vocal Health Education and Exercise Help

Abigail Wilson, Truman State University; Lorrin McBee, Truman State University Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of education about vocal health on MAE students’ ability to care for their voice while on internship. We plan to compare two types of voice education to see if one is better than the other. The first is education about vocal health presented in lecture format followed by weekly check-ins (Group 1). The second is education about vocal health presented in lecture format plus vocal exercise training also followed by weekly check-ins (Group 2). Data collection is underway. The weekly check-ins will include self-ratings using the Voice Related Quality of Life (VRQoL) and Voice Handicap Index (VHI) scales. We will be presenting trends in student perception of their voice quality and reliability of their voice as they progress through their internship (Groups 1 & 2) as well as trends in compliance in exercise completion (Group 2).

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the use of vocal exercises to help maintain or improve vocal quality in student teachers, explain the use of self-rating scales to discuss voice quality over time, identify factors relating to compliance for voice exercises (Group 2) and weekly check-in (both Groups).

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 30 - Efficacy of Available Treatment Options for Childhood Apraxia of Speech

Emily Keating, BA, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Lynne Shields, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Fontbonne University

Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) is a motor speech disorder that affects precision and consistency of speech. There are a wide variety of treatment options available for children affected by CAS. This poster will present research supporting the efficacy of various approaches used with children with CAS.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list key features of CAS that are addressed in treatment, compare the available treatment approaches for children with CAS, identify the effectiveness of various treatment approaches for children with CAS.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 31 - The Effectiveness of Social Stories for Children With ASD

Claire McCarthy, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Laura O'Hara, Select One, Fontbonne University

Social stories are a therapeutic technique commonly used to develop social skills in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This poster will describe the components of social stories and ways to implement them in intervention. The effectiveness of social stories for school-aged children with ASD will be examined.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list the steps necessary for developing social stories, describe ways to best implement social stories in intervention, identify the effectiveness of social stories for school-aged children with ASD.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 32 - Serving Children with Hearing Loss in Low-SES Homes

Carolyn Silveira, BS, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Gail Rice, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

A number of well-known studies have examined the language gap between children from families of low-socioeconomic status and children from families who are considered to be more financially stable. This language disadvantage can be harmful for any child, but is even more detrimental for children diagnosed with a hearing loss due to the already present risks of language delay. This poster will review information and techniques on parent-led interventions to increase language development, as well as how professionals can exercise the greatest competency when providing services to families who are of low SES and their children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the consequences of children with hearing loss living in low-SES homes, identify the best ways to personally serve families who are of low-SES, provide training parent-led intervention specific to low-SES populations.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 33 - Relationship Between Student Behavior and Vocal Health of Student Teachers

Melinda Pfeiffer, University of Missouri; Katherine Johnson, University of Missouri Supervisor: Maria Dietrich, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

Teaching is a vocally demanding job, putting teachers at risk for voice disorders. Furthermore, teachers who already had voice problems as a student teacher are at higher risk for voice disorders. Disruptive student behavior in the classroom is a risk factor that could contribute to voice problems in student teachers. The aim of this study was to investigate whether disruptive student behavior correlated with voice quality of life in student teachers after a semester of teaching. We hypothesized that student teachers with disruptive classrooms would experience more voice problems, especially those who were not as assertive and stress resilient as their peers. As part of a larger study, 19 female vocally healthy student teachers were tested before and after their semester of teaching. Each completed questionnaires including the Voice Handicap Index – 10, Vocal Fatigue Index, an informal vocal health questionnaire and personality questionnaires. The vocal health questionnaire included ratings of student behavior and other related questions such as how the student teacher got and maintained the attention of her class. Student behavior significantly correlated with a sub-scale of the Vocal Fatigue Index related to lack of improvement of voice symptoms with rest. The worse the student behavior, the less likely their voices would recover. Generally, student teachers scoring lower on self-esteem and social dominance, experienced more voice problems during student teaching. Student teachers should be instructed in how to effectively manage disruptive classroom environments while limiting vocal strain to prevent future voice disorders.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify specific personality traits as risk factors for voice problems in student teachers, identify disruptive classroom behaviors as a risk factor for voice problems in student teachers, identify specific voice changes or problems that indicate risk factors for a voice disorder in student teachers.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 34 - A Comparison of the Children’s Communication Checklist With the Test of Pragmatic Language-2, and the Test of Pragmatic Skills

Olivia Richardson, BS, Southeast Missouri State University Supervisor: Marcia Brown-Haims, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of the Children’s Communication Checklist–2 (CCC-2; D.V.M Bishop, 2006) when identifying children with autism spectrum disorder as having a pragmatic impairment. Specifically, the objective of this study is to identify whether or not the Children’s Communication Checklist – 2 is a viable resource to use in the diagnosis of a child with autism spectrum disorder with a pragmatic language impairment. The subjects were given the Test of Pragmatic Language (TOPL-2; Phelps-Terasaki & Phelps-Gunn, 2007) and the Test of Pragmatic Skills (TOPS; B. Shulman, 1986), and the parents/guardians of the subjects completed the Children’s Communication Checklist – 2 (CCC-2; D.V.M Bishop, 2006). The scores of all the tests and the questionnaire were analyzed and shared with the parents/guardians of the subjects. The child’s scores and the parents’ responses were analyzed and the correlation between the measures will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify three pragmatic language assessment tools, explain the purpose of the Children’s Communication Checklist-2, apply the results of this study to their future pragmatic language assessments.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 35 - Listening-While-Reading vs. Choral Reading to Improve Reading Fluency

Heather Ward, BA, Truman University Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

An alternating treatment design was used to compare the effects of two different reading approaches on oral reading fluency. The two approaches implemented in therapy were Listening-While-Reading and Choral Reading. Listening-While-Reading requires a subject to listen and follow along to a passage while the text is read out loud by an instructor and then read individually. Choral Reading requires the subject and instructor to read a passage in unison and then have the subject read alone out loud. The study wanted to see which approach improved a client’s overall oral reading fluency. The client was an eight year old with a language and literacy disorder. The client was required to read two second grade level passages. The single subject was presented with these two approaches at the beginning and end of each therapy session. Data was collected by counting the number of the subject’s read errors for each approach. The result of the study revealed that the Listening-While-Reading approach was more successful than Choral Reading. Listening-While-Reading resulted in less read errors overall improving the subject’s oral reading fluency.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe one single-subject research design that allows clinicians to document treatment efficacy, identify whether or not the treatment described was helpful to the client, explain how memory techniques were used with a client and how the client's response to treatment was measured.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 36 - The Effect of Visual Biofeedback on the Production of /z//a>

Lesley Shanks, BA, Truman State University Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of visual biofeedback as a functional treatment tool for an adult client with a mild articulation disorder. This study was an ABAB withdrawal design consisting of four phases: baseline, treatment, withdrawal and reintroduction of treatment. Data was collected based on the client’s ability to produce /z/ in isolation; initial, medial and final positions of words, phrases and sentences from a list created out of a random pull of three items from each pool of 50 items. Treatment was given using visual biofeedback from the VisiPitch in each phase of the hierarchy: isolation, single words, phrases and sentences. Results indicate that the use of visual biofeedback, in this case, the VisiPitch, increased the client’s accuracy in the production of /z/ in a variety of different contexts.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe ABAB withdrawal single-subject research design that allows clinicians to document treatment efficacy, identify whether or not the treatment described in this session was helpful to the client, explain how visual biofeedback was used with a client and how the client's response to treatment was measured.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 37 - Guide to Reflective Caregiver Coaching for the SLP

Alyssa Wagner, BS, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Gale Rice, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

Professionals working in early intervention settings train caregivers in communication facilitation strategies. Effective coaching allows caregivers to promote communication development at home. Engaging in reflective coaching practices can foster capacity-building by allowing caregivers to determine the effectiveness of their actions and formulate a plan to enhance interactions with their child. This poster presentation will guide participants through the process and rationale of reflective coaching.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list three benefits of using reflective coaching with caregivers, recall three components of an effective parent coaching session, delineate three reflective caregiver coaching strategies.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 38 - Childhood Apraxia of Speech: An Overview of Common Treatment Approaches

Elizabeth James, BA, Fontbonne University; Lauren Schmuke, BS, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Laura O'Hara, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

Although 63% of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) regularly work with children diagnosed with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2016), current research may be insufficient to guide the SLP to the most effective method for his or her client. Many different treatment approaches, including motor programming, linguistic approaches, sensory cueing and rhythmic and prosodic facilitation, are commonly used to address CAS. This presentation synthesizes current research in order to bring clarity to the process of treatment method selection in light of the common characteristics of CAS. It will give an overview of the effectiveness of common approaches and give suggestions on utilizing approaches that are appropriate for certain client demographics.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the most commonly used treatment approaches for CAS, compare and contrast the characteristics of motor programming, linguistic, sensory cueing and rhythmic treatment approaches, associate common treatment approaches to CAS with specific age range and disorder severity demographics.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 39 - Therapy Strategies for Speech Disorders Associated With Cleft Palate

Anna Robinson, University of Missouri; Nicole Banda, BS, University of Missouri Supervisor: Anne Bedwinek, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

ASHA Special Interest Group 5, Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, Continuing Education Committee offers this poster as a practical guide for therapeutic management of school-aged children with speech disorders associated with cleft palate and/or velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD). Appropriate referral to a craniofacial team and evidence-based treatment techniques will be emphasized.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the obligatory speech features of VPD and differentiate these from compensatory articulation errors associated with VPD to determine an appropriate referral to a craniofacial team, describe three types of speech treatment strategies to address compensatory articulation errors in children with repaired cleft palate or VPD, describe three solutions to increase effectiveness of treatment and increase generalization of learned skills across environments.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 40 - Phonological Awareness Skills of Undergraduate Students in Speech-Language Pathology

Cheryl Needham-Rives, MA, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Janelle Harvey, BS, University of Central Missouri; Morgan Miller, BS, University of Central Missouri; Greg Turner, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) rely on keen phonological and phonemic awareness ability to perceive and discriminate speech sounds. This skill is important to provide effective evaluation and treatment services for articulation of speech sounds, language development and learning to read and spell. The literature further indicates many professionals providing evaluation and intervention services have deficits in their own explicit phonological awareness skills (Spencer, Schuele, Guillot & Lee, 2008). Well trained SLPs have unique knowledge and skills in this area and according to studies, this skill comes from both preservice training and clinical experience after graduation (Spencer, Schuele, Guillot & Lee, 2011). In preservice training, students in communication sciences and disorders program take courses such as phonetics, designed to emphasize explicit phonemic awareness skills; with the intent of actually improving phonemic awareness skills. Spencer and colleagues (2011) suggest students studying to be speech-language pathologists exhibit phonological and/or phonemic awareness skills exceeding other professionals; however, no studies have directly assessed student knowledge and skills in a number of different domains of language and literacy surrounding phonological and phonemic awareness. The data to be presented in the poster is part of a larger study evaluating phonological and/or phonemic awareness of undergraduate students before and after enrolling in a phonetics course. This initial data provides a description of the typical phonological and/or phonemic skills of these undergraduate speech-language pathology majors from a mid-western university prior to taking the course.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to differentiate different phonological and/or phonemic skills, identify the importance of such knowledge and skills for SLPs, identify how certain phonological and/or phonemic skills can be taught with a class in phonetics.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 41 - Choosing Good Vocabulary Targets: Which Words Do Preschoolers Learn?

Haley Bergman, BHS, University of Missouri Supervisor: Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

To provide effective vocabulary instruction, clinicians must make careful decisions about which words to teach. It can be challenging to select vocabulary targets that will best support conversational and pre-literacy skills for preschoolers. This poster provides information to guide clinicians in choosing target vocabulary to explicitly teach during shared storybook readings with preschoolers. Using evidence from a series of vocabulary intervention studies, characteristics of target vocabulary were examined including word type, length of the definition, type of interaction (e.g., picture vs. gesture) and strength and variety of child-friendly examples to determine if these factors make a difference in word learning success. Similarities and differences between words learned most frequently by preschoolers are described. In addition, word learning data from storybooks that included two target vocabulary words was compared with books that taught four words. From these analyses, recommendations are provided to assist clinicians in the selection of vocabulary targets that include characteristics of the most frequently learned words. Sample words and lessons are included.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe strategies for identification of good vocabulary targets for preschool vocabulary instruction, list important characteristics of words that make them good choices for explicit vocabulary instruction, identify key components of explicit vocabulary instruction.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Sunday 7:45 am - 8:45 am

SP 42 - Language and Social Risk Factors for Autism in Young Infants

Leslie Abney, University of Missouri Supervisor: Ashleigh Boyd, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

Early identification of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is beneficial to health professionals providing intervention and ensuring the best outcomes for children with ASD. Recent research has focused on identifying early risk factors for autism that are present in young infants. Given this knowledge, a review of the current literature in this area was warranted in combination with dissemination of findings to fellow health professionals and families of young infants. The purpose of this literature review was to bring to light some of the recent findings regarding language and social related risk factors associated with autism for infants who are 18 months or younger and to obtain more information about best-practice for identifying these risk factors in infants. A review of the current literature revealed several early risk factors (e.g., delayed language, reduced object sharing with caregivers) in young infants who were considered at risk for autism (i.e., infants who have an older sibling diagnosed with ASD). A review of the literature also revealed several proven means to identify infants with autism (e.g., Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers – Revised (M-CHAT-R), Ages and Stages Questionnaire) and a promising autism risk rater using objective eye tracking. Several language and social risk factors for autism are present at a young age. Speech-language pathologists and other health professionals play a crucial role in early identification of autism spectrum disorder.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to state three language and social related risk factors for autism in infants 18 months and younger, detect language and social related risk factors for autism in infants 18 months and younger, list two reliable means of identifying infants 18 months and younger with autism.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 43 - Medical Action Plans: Strategies for Parents to Support Medical Professionals

Megan Rehard, BA, University of Missouri Supervisor: Ashleigh Boyd, MA, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

To provide effective medical care to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), collaboration between family members and health professionals is crucial for the development of an optimal care plan. Children with special needs, particularly children with ASD, pose behavioral challenges when exposed to unfamiliar settings (e.g., emergency room) during traumatic medical events. A better understanding of a child’s behavior during a visit or stay in a medical setting may lead to effective care planning and intervention. Families of children with ASD possess essential information that can positively contribute to the medical care process. The benefits medical action plans may have for children with ASD may not be well known. Additionally, specific criterion and objectives of action plans and their implementation methods are not well understood. Therefore, information is needed to explain the benefits that medical action plans may have on the health of children with ASD and to further explain their application during a medical event. This presentation provides information to parents and caregivers in the formulation of medical action plans and in the guidance of medical professionals in the best management of their child when visiting or staying in a medical setting. Using evidence from a series of pediatric health care management reviews and studies, characteristics of effective communication strategies and medical action plans were examined to determine what factors are most beneficial. From these analyses, recommendations are provided to assist families in the collection of these communication strategies and action plan objectives.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to state the rationale for addressing children with ASD and other special health care needs in medical settings, describe medical action plans that exist for children with ASD and other health concerns, explain the effectiveness of medical action plans for children with ASD and special needs.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 44 - Speech-Language Pathologists' Role Throughout the Progression of ALS

Nolan Johnson, BS, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Carmen Russell, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

Previous research has investigated different causes, assessments and treatments for communication and swallowing disorders for individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The objective of this study was to collect and compile current ALS research to create a guideline for speech-language pathologists to follow when encountering a patient with ALS. This will allow speech-language pathologists to have efficient access to a wide-range of research which should be consulted to ensure adequate services are being provided to patients with ALS throughout the progression of the disease.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the known causes of ALS, identify a variety of assessments that can be used with ALS patients throughout the progression of the disease, identify a variety of treatment methods that are effective when treating patients with ALS.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 45 - The Effects Of Kangaroo Care on Mother-Infant Interaction

Nicole Reyes, BS, Southeast Missouri State University Supervisor: Marcia Brown-Haims, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the effects of kangaroo care on mother-infant interaction. Specifically the study was designed to determine if there were any differences between mother-infant interactions in mothers who implemented kangaroo mother care with those who used traditional care. All infants were preterm, low birth weight infants. This data is part of an ongoing, five year project. We are currently in year three. Results will be presented for all infants assessed this far and differences between the groups will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe kangaroo mother care, list three benefits of kangaroo mother care, distinguish kangaroo mother care from traditional care.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 46 - Applying Motor Learning Principles to Treatment of Cleft Palate Speech

Michelle Krahenbuhl, BA, St. Louis University Supervisor: Lynn Marty Grames, MA, CCC-SLP, St. Louis University

incorrectly learned motor patterns that developed prior to reconstructive surgery of the palate; most commonly these errors include glottal stops, pharyngeal stops and fricatives, mid-dorsum palatal stops, posterior nasal fricatives and sometimes velar and ingressive fricatives. Because compensatory speech errors found in children with repaired cleft palates are phonetic in nature (i.e., involving errors related to the place of articulation), a motor learning approach has been recommended over a phonological approach when addressing misarticulations among the cleft palate population. This poster will describe a motor learning approach as it relates to patients with repaired cleft palates as well as delineate the research that supports the use of a motor learning approach when addressing maladaptive articulation errors in speech therapy. In addition, a case study will be presented that illustrates the use of a motor planning approach for a child with a repaired cleft palate.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe motor learning principles as they relate to treatment of children with repaired cleft palate, explain the research that supports the use of a motor learning approach over a phonological approach for children with repaired cleft palates, devise a treatment plan for a child with a repaired cleft palate using motor learning principles.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 47 - Integrating Music in Treating Expressive Language in Children With ASD

Alyssa Olson, BA, University of Central Missouri Supervisor: B. Jean Zimmer, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri

This poster will present information on how to use music to decrease behaviors that interfere with communication in those who have a diagnosis of autism sprectrum disorder (ASD). Individuals with ASD often present with behaviors that affect expressive language. These behaviors also can interfere with the benefit of treatment for the development of expressive communication. Procedures will be presented in how to use music to decrease the impact of these behaviors on communication.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list at least three behaviors that interfere with expressive language children with a diagnosis of ASD, list three activities using music to integrate into expressive language therapy, list three ways that integrating music into therapy decreases the impact of behaviors that interfere with the benefit of language therapy.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 48 - Contrastive Production Treatment for a Client With Flaccid Dysarthria

Brandy Mooney, BS, University of Central Missouri Supervisor: Greg Turner, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri

This case study investigated the use of contrastive production drills (Yorkston, Buekelman, Strand, and Hakel, 2010) in order to increase acoustic distinctiveness of phonetic contrasts in a speaker with moderate flaccid dysarthria. Treatment targeted glottal-null (hair-air) and fricative-affricate (share-chair) contrast pairs. The clinician judged the perceptual distinctiveness of the contrastive pair drills based on a zero-three scale where zero was completely distinct, one was mildly indistinct, two was moderately indistinct and three was “extremely indistinct.” The clinician used this scale visually to provide the client with feedback after every attempt. A specific practice schedule was applied based on client performance. If the client produced the minimal pair words with typical perceptual distinction (zero), the clinician instructed the client to say the pair in the same manner before moving on to the next minimal pair. If the judgment by the clinician was greater than a one, the clinician instructed the client to say the word pair again but with greater perceptual distinction between the words. Therapy initially focused on mass practice in order to give the client early success. Once the client reached 70 percent accuracy, the clinician implemented random practice to ensure that his contrast pairs generalized. Self-monitoring activities were also undertaken at this level. Results revealed increased perceptual acoustic distinctiveness in both trained and untrained contrast pairs.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe phonetic contrast errors due to flaccid dysarthria, explain contrastive production treatment, apply motor learning skills in treatment.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 49 - Co-Morbid Conditions in Individuals Diagnosed With ASD

Avery Bowling, BS, University of Central Missouri; Taylor Carmichael, BS, University of Central Missouri Supervisor: B. Jean Zimmer, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri y

This poster will present the occurrence of co-morbid conditions in both pediatric and adult individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This poster will also present how these co-morbid diagnoses impact these individual's everyday living, treatment and life expectancy. The information will assist speech-language pathologists and other educators in determining ethical and best treatment options to enhance the quality of life for these individuals.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list a variety of common co-morbid conditions in individuals diagnosed with ASD, determine treatment needs of those with ASD and co-morbid conditions, determine and make appropriate referrals when co-morbid conditions are present in individuals diagnosed with ASD.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 50 - Incorporating Physical Activity in Therapy for Individuals With ASD

Supervisor: B. Jean Zimmer, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri Tanner Roberts, BS, University of Central Missouri; Taylor Steinmetz, BS, University of Central Missouri

This poster will present the benefits of incorporating physical activity in speech-language therapy for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Ways to incorporate physical activity will be discussed and demonstrated. The use of visual aids that can assist the client in physical activity in therapy will be presented. Information websites to facilitate the use of physical activities in therapy will be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list at least three benefits of incorporating physical activity into speech-language therapy for those who have a diagnosis of ASD, list five physical activities that can be used in the therapy with those who have a diagnosis of ASD, list at least three ways to use visual aids to demonstrate the use of physical activity in therapy with those who have a diagnosis of ASD.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 51 - Nicaraguan Sign Language: A Brief Tutorial

Mary Stroud, BS, Missouri State University; Supervisor: Lisa Proctor, PhD, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University

The purpose of this student project was to research the history of Nicaraguan Sign Language (NSL) and provide a video tutorial of practical/commonly used signs and phrases. Methods for this project involved completing a literature review to gain an understanding regarding the history and development of NSL. In addition, the student investigator used NSL printed resources (e.g., books) and traveled to Nicaragua to develop the video tutorial of NSL. This poster will share the findings on the history of NSL, how this language has been used to better understand language and language development, as well as the completed video tutorial. Finally, future uses for the information on the history of NSL and video tutorial will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify three facts about the background/history of NSL, perform/demonstrate five NSL signs, list two available resources to learn NSL.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 52 - Association vs. Visualization Techniques to Improve Memory

Taylor Lunn, BS, Truman State University Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

More than half of individuals who experience severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) have chronic memory problems, particularly in the area of encoding and retrieving new information (Goldstein & Levin, 1991). The purpose of this study is to examine specific memory techniques to aid in encoding and retrieving items from short term memory. Association and visualization techniques were selected for this specific study due to previous research and subject input. The subject received training in both techniques before treatment was implemented. The subject was a thirty-six-year-old female who suffered a TBI three years ago. An alternating treatment design was implemented. The subject was presented with six randomly selected vocabulary words and asked to remember them after ten minutes of a separate task, which did not target any type of memory. The subject was instructed to visualize an actual picture of the word presented to her while using the visualization technique, and to use the beginning letter of each word to tie the vocabulary words together while using the association technique. While session attendance interfered with the results of the data, it was clear that the visualization technique had better results. Further research could implement these treatments again to assess the results in subjects with better attendance.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe one single-subject research design that allows clinicians to document treatment efficacy, identify whether or not the treatment described in this session was helpful to the client, explain how memory techniques were used with a client and how the client's response to treatment was measured.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 53 - Variability in Intentional Increase of Intensity During Voicing Efficiency Tasks

Taylor Hall, BA, University of Missouri Supervisor: Maria Dietrich, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

Aerodynamic voice measures are used to assess laryngeal function. The aim of this study was to determine the variability in increases in loudness when participants are asked to perform voicing efficiency tasks in loud conditions and if loudness also varied as a function of syllable used and personality. Based on previous research, we hypothesized a mean increase in intensity of six dB from comfortable to loud conditions as well as greater loudness for /pa/ versus /pi/. We hypothesized that persons with introverted traits would have smaller increases in intensity. Participants were current and prospective female student teachers who participated in two voice studies. In the studies, a voicing efficiency task was conducted involving three sets of five strings of /pi/ or /pa/ using the Phonatory Aerodynamic System (KayPentax), for both comfortable and elevated loudness. Personality was measured with the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire—Brief Form. Preliminary data revealed that for the study containing /pi/, the mean raw increase in dB was 3.9 (SD = 1.9). For the study containing /pa/, the mean raw increase in dB was 5.6 (SD = 4.0). There was a significant correlation between higher scores on trait stress reactivity and smaller intensity changes. The preliminary data suggest great variability among individuals when using aerodynamic measures to assess voice. The hypothesis that greater loudness would be achieved with /pa/ over /pi/ was confirmed. Results indicate that persons who are prone to experience stress have smaller changes in intensity from comfortable to intentional loud voice.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe an aerodynamic voicing efficiency task, differentiate the effect of comfortable and loud voice productions on voicing efficiency measures, identify how the performance of voicing efficiency tasks varies depending on personality traits.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 54 - Use of Music to Increase Verbalizations in Children With ASD

Kelsey Williams, University of Missouri Supervisor: Ashleigh Boyd, MHS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often exhibit verbal communication deficits that negatively impact their abilities to participate in daily activities. While traditional intervention approaches, such as ABA, aim to improve the communication of these individuals, research has shown that the use of music within intervention practices has been particularly beneficial in increasing the verbal output of non-verbal and pre-verbal children with ASD. However, limited information regarding the benefits associated with the use of music is known at this time. Additionally, specific guidelines for how to effectively incorporate music into current intervention methods are not widely understood. Therefore, more information is needed to explain the benefits of the use of music with individuals with ASD to improve their verbal communication skills as well as how to implement music based activities into current therapy practices effortlessly and efficiently. This poster session will provide detailed information regarding the rationale and benefits associated with the use of melodic and rhythm based activities when working with children with ASD, as well as how to effectively implement this approach to improve quality of care.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the benefits of incorporating music into therapy for children with ASD, describe the benefits of incorporating general rhythmic activities into intervention practices, explain how to implement music into current intervention practices easily and effectively.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 55 - Speech Characteristics of College Aged Students

Cassidy Main, Truman University; Erynn Skoglund, Truman Univeristy Supervisor: Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman Univeristy

The purpose of this research was to determine if there were certain activities that college students participate in which predict presence of glottal fry. Participants were asked to complete demographic surveys, items related to activities on a college campus, a survey related to vocal habits and an informal personality quiz. The first two tools were designed by the researchers while the second pair of tools were adapted from published works. Conversational samples and reading samples for each participant were subjectively evaluated for presence of glottal fry. Data collected was evaluated for participation patterns and/or personality traits that best predicted presence of glottal fry. Data analysis was not available prior to this submission deadline, but will be completed before the convention. Results will be verbally and graphically portrayed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify what activities (social, academic, service, etc.) influence the use of glottal fry, identify vocal habits that influence the use of glottal fry, identify dominant personality traits which influence glottal fry.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 56 - The Effect of Visual Biofeedback on Increasing Intonation Ranges

Jessica Campbell, BS, Truman State University Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

Intonational patterns generally differ depending on gender of an individual and is often a target of transsexual voice therapy. A case study focused on increasing intonational ranges of a client transitioning from her biological gender, male to her desired gender, female. Baseline was collected and the use of visual biofeedback was then introduced to reveal if it would widen the ranges of intonation and shift the client’s average fundamental frequency while reading a conversational dialogue with the clinician. Results showed that the use of visual biofeedback did widen the ranges and average fundamental frequency values increased.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe one single-subject research design that allows clinicians to document treatment efficacy, identify whether or not the treatment described in the session was helpful to the client, explain how visual biofeedback was used with a client and how the client's response to treatment was measured.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 57 - Possible Etiologies of Residual Speech Sound Disorders in Adolescents

Michelle McOsker, BS, Rockhurst University Supervisor: Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the possible etiologies of residual speech sound disorders in adolescents. This was conducted through comprehensive database searches to obtain articles. Seven articles met inclusion and exclusion criteria and were selected for review. These articles were appraised for quality based on study design, research background, methodology, description of the results and implications of findings. There were 580 participants across the seven studies that were administered various assessments to determine possible underlying causes of their speech sound disorder. Seven etiologies were proposed across the studies, including speech perception, phonological abilities, vocabulary, language, literacy, cognition and oral motor functioning.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the nature of residual speech sound disorders, identify possible causes of residual speech sound disorders, summarize one of the proposed causes of residual speech sound disorders and its contended impact on articulation and phonology.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 58 - Birth Order Effects on Language Development

Jana Lindstrom, BS, Rockhurst University; Briann Burris, BS, Rockhurst University Supervisor: Grace McConnell, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

This systematic review focuses on peer-reviewed articles that further speech-language pathologists’ understanding of the effects birth order has on language development. Computer searches of electronic databases and hand searches were conducted for studies that met the inclusion criteria. This review included four articles that explored birth order effects on language development. Language development differences were found between siblings of different birth orders including vocabulary, conversational skills and pronoun use. Further research is needed to provide a better understanding of the cause of birth order differences and how to compensate for them.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to gain knowledge about the variations of language development across birth order, learn about the differing pronoun development among siblings, acquire an understanding of vocabulary differences in firstborn and laterborn children.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 59 - Facilitating Productive Supervisor and Student Relationships at Off-Site Placements

Whitney Wipfler, BA, University of Central Missouri; Molly Snyder, BS, University of Central Missouri Supervisor: Nancy Montgomery, PhD, University of Central Missouri

Off site placements act as a final requirement for graduate students pursuing their degree in speech-language pathology. Off-site placement supervision has a significant influence on many speech-language paathologists entering the workforce. This research project analyzes exit surveys completed by graduate students and off-site supervisors to identify aspects of the student and supervisor relationships and communication that will enhance the experience for the student and the supervisor. Researchers hypothesize that students will benefit from written and constructive feedback, while supervisors will benefit from the satisfaction of teaching students skills that will carryover into the student’s general practice. Analyzing and sharing feedback of exit surveys will hopefully inspire off-site SLPs to supervise graduate students, while better preparing graduate students for the expectations of off-site supervisors. Ultimately, as off-site SLPs share their knowledge with graduate students entering the field in the form of feedback of techniques, advice and knowledge about the field, more graduate students will enter the workforce prepared to increase the quality of life experienced by the clients.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to learn the importance of effective communication skills and inquiry while under the direction of their supervisor in an off-site placement, SLPs in the medical and school-based settings will learn the benefits of effective supervision and mentorship of graduate students, supervisors in the medical and school based settings will acquire knowledge about beneficial feedback and training of graduate students.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 60 - Using Phonetic Placement Cueing and Spectral Biofeedback to Remediate Misarticulations

Leah Black, BS, Truman State University Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of visual spectral biofeedback to phonetic placement cueing in remediation of residual misarticulation of /s/ and /z/. An interaction addition single-subject design was implemented with a 22-year-old female college student. A stable baseline was established on the productions of /s/ and /z/ in isolation, words, sentences, paragraphs and in conversation. The first independent variable, phonetic placement cueing, was implemented. Visual cues and auditory instructions were utilized to facilitate correct productions of /s/ and /z/. Once a response pattern was established, the second independent variable, the Visi-Pitch for visual spectral biofeedback was then implemented to facilitate correct productions of /s/ and /z/. During the next phase of treatment, phonetic placement cueing techniques were re-implemented in isolation. The goal was to determine whether visual spectral biofeedback was contributing to the facilitation of correct productions of /s/ and /z/. Accurate sound productions occurred when the participant’s tongue made close contact to the alveolar ridge and when typical sound quality characteristics were used. The results revealed a gradual increase in the accuracy of target sounds in isolation using phonetic placement cueing. After visual spectral biofeedback was added, the participant continued to experience an increase in the accuracy of productions. After removal of visual spectral biofeedback, the participant experienced a slight decrease in accurate articulations. Intervention that commences with phonetic placement cueing and is augmented by visual spectral biofeedback may facilitate learning of speech sounds in individuals with residual speech sound errors.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to utilize phonetic placement cueing in addition to spectral biofeedback to remediate residual misarticulation of /s/ and /z/, conduct intervention for residual sound errors that utilizes phonetic placement cueing and spectral biofeedback, apply phonetic placement cueing in addition to spectral biofeedback for other residual misarticulations.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 61 - Public Perceptions of Noise Levels

Corrine Reeves, Truman State University; Laura Woods, Truman State University Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A, Truman State University

The purpose of this study is to determine how accurately college students can identify dangerous noise levels in their everyday environments.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list three common environments where college students may be exposed to dangerous noise levels, identify two types of hearing protection, list two variables that impact a college students’ decision to utilize hearing protection.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 62 - The Effects of Communication Partner Training on Communicative Interactions

Emily Geringer, BS, Fontbonne University Supervisor: Carmen Russell, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

In recent years, there has been much research on communication partner training (CPT). CPT is an external intervention directed at spouses, family members, caregivers or health care workers of individuals with aphasia to improve communication skills, participation and overall quality of life. This research has focused on results of different types of training programs, their effect on the communication partner and their effect on the individual with aphasia. It has been found that CPT does improve communicative interactions for individuals with chronic aphasia, especially programs with an emphasis on counseling. It has also been found that this type of intervention acts as a communication ramp for individuals with aphasia, giving them access to more meaningful conversations. This information is clinically relevant as it outlines specific techniques and strategies for making communication partner training successful. This includes the different types of methods and strategies implemented in CPT programs, the effects on communicative interactions between the communication partner and individual with aphasia and the overall benefits of communication partner training programs. Specifically, tips and strategies to make successful communicative interactions that will lead to an overall improved quality of life for individuals with aphasia will be presented.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe what makes a communicative interaction successful, identify communication partner training techniques and strategies, list three benefits of communication partner training for the individual with aphasia.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 63 - Use of AAC Devices and Speech Production

Taylor Whitaker, BS, Rockhurst University; Brenna Gallagher, BA, Rockhurst University; Carissa Throckmorton, BA, Rockhurst University Supervisor: Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

This study presents the results of a review of the literature examining the effectiveness of high-technology and low-technology augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices for promoting verbal speech development in school age children diagnosed with a developmental disability. A comprehensive search of various electronic databases was performed to select studies that fit the inclusion criteria for this review. The quality of all relevant studies was appraised using a rating scale of one to three, with one being low quality and three being the highest. Participants and treatment characteristics from each study were categorized. The review identified six studies that pertained to the research question. Among these studies were systematic reviews, experimental designs, single subject designs and a survey. All studies used in this review referenced the use of high technology or low technology AAC devices across varying disorders. The review reveals that the AAC device chosen for a specific child is dependent upon his or her individual needs, abilities and environment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the differences between low-technology and high-technology AAC devices, identify characteristics of individuals who qualify for AAC devices, list three ways AAC devices can increase speech output for individuals with developmental disabilities.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 64 - Do Filler Words Occur Between or Within Category Shifts?

Sarah Meine, University of Missouri Supervisor: Bryan Brown, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

The production of filler words appears to serve a specific pragmatic function signifying an upcoming delay in speech. Specifically, um is used to signify a major delay (e.g., topic shift) while uh signifies a minor delay (e.g., word finding; Clark & Fox Tree, 2002). The extant literature indicates that children between the ages of three to four years of age use fillers words interchangeably and not to indicate magnitude of delay (Hudson, et al., 2008). Recent work from our lab indicates that pragmatic use of filler words begins to emerge around age five (Prigge, Brown & Wagovich, 2016). Filler words are thought to reflect increased linguistic planning load (Bortfeld et al., 2001), given this production of fillers should be related to linguistic and psycholinguistic features of oral language. To address this we collected data from 16 typically developing children (5;1-6;10) during two divergent categorical naming tasks. We examined the frequency and duration of fillers to determine if young school-age children signify major and minor delays as adults do. Results are expected to reveal that um (major delay) will be more likely to occur between categories, whereas uh (minor delay) will be more likely to occur within categories.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to summarize the research question, discuss relevant issues related to filler use, differentiate pragmatic function of the fillers words um and uh.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 65 - Community Music-Making Group: Immediate Effects on Self-Perception of Communication Abilities

Emily Kroll, Missouri State University Supervisor: Alana Mantie-Kozlowski, PhD, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University

Communication impairment often leads to decreased participation and psychosocial well being for people with aphasia (PWA). Based on previous research showing the benefits of group interaction and music for PWA, a community music-making group (CMMG) is an emerging method to increase quality of life for PWA. The objective is to investigate whether participation in a CMMG has an effect on PWA’s general attitudes and self-perception of communication abilities. The methods used were a qualitative-descriptive study on a previously established CMMG facilitated by a speech-language pathologist, music therapist and graduate students at Missouri State University. An established American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) questionnaire and semi-structured interview questions with Iikert Scale scoring were administered to participants both immediately before and after choir participation. Though the questionnaire did not reveal any consistent trends, all participants indicated in the interview that participation in the choir increased their mood for the day and three out of four indicated it increase self-perception of their communication abilities. Though limited by a small number of participants, and lack of control for outside influences, this study provides preliminary evidence that CMMG for PWA is a means to increase mood and self-perception of communication abilities.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to recall a technique used to increase quality of communication life for people with aphasia, identify ways in which a music-making group can be beneficial for people with aphasia, increase understanding regarding quality of life issues for individuals with aphasia.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 66 - Dialogic Reading and its Effect on Expressive Language

Mary Kabbaz, BA, Truman State University Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

Dialogic reading is the incorporation of engaging and interactive strategies used during shared book reading activities with children. These strategies include WH-questions, open-ended questions and recall prompts to name a few. Various studies have shown the positive effects of dialogic reading and how it can increase verbal expression, behavior and cognition abilities in the pediatric population. This study analyzed a client's expressive language through a single subject, A-B-A-B design. The independent variable and treatment were dialogic reading, and the dependent variable was the nature of the client's response. The client and the clinician read a children's book for 10-15 minutes during each session. The clinician rated the client’s responses using multi-dimensional scoring (a zero-three scale). Zero equaled a gesture response, one equals an imitated response, two represented a response that was elicited after a verbal prompt (e.g., the client responds after the clinician asks a question), and three represented the client producing spontaneous utterances. Once the data was analyze and graphed, it was determined by the clinician that dialogic reading was effective in helping the client's expressive language expand.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe single-subject research and how the design allows clinicians to document treatment efficacy, identify whether or not the treatment of dialogic reading was helpful to the client, explain how dialogic reading was used with the client and how the client's response to treatment was measured.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 67 - Resources for Caregivers of Children With Facial Anomalies

Madison Saunders, University of Central Missouri Supervisor: Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

Once a child is diagnosed with a cleft palate, the parents and child are assigned to a cleft palate team; among these professionals is a speech-language pathologist (SLP). Many SLPs reported they have not received much formal training on facial anomalies. Children with cleft palates have a multitude of associated deficits. This poster focuses on deficits in the areas of articulation, voice, swallowing and feeding, hearing and language. Oral stops, fricatives and affricates are the most misarticulated phonemes by a child with a cleft palate. Along with misarticulation, many children with cleft palates have resonance deficits. Due to the lack of a variety of phonemes present in the child’s phonemic inventory, language is greatly affected. Facial anomalies may lead to malformation of the Eustachian tube, leading to frequent otitis media, and of the velopharyngeal port, responsible for feeding and swallowing disorders and hypernasality. This research serves as a resource for SLPs to give to parents of children with cleft palates. This publication is primarily focused on early intervention; it includes helpful resources for parents as they maneuver their child’s early life and programs they can implement in the home to assist in their child’s progress.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to recall information regarding cleft palates, identify early interventions for articulation, language, voice, and swallowing and feeding disorders, recall resources to assist parents and professional from diagnosis through therapy.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 68 - Message Retrieval/Representation on AAC devices For Individuals With TBI

Kacee Higgins, BS, Rockhurst University; Erin Keane, BS, Rockhurst University; Katelyn O'Connor, BS, Rockhurst University Supervisor: Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

Individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) often present with cognitive-communication deficits following damage to the brain, such as the inability to use natural speech. These individuals may require augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies as their primary mode of communication. The primary objective of the systematic review was to explore literature regarding the most effective message retrieval and message representation methods on AAC devices for individuals with TBI. Studies evaluated in the systematic review suggest AAC strategies that incorporate an alphabet organizational strategy and images on device screens are most effective for individuals with TBI.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to summarize benefits and challenges of using AAC strategies for individuals with TBI, to identify ways to support and accommodate needs of individuals with TBI using AAC strategies, recognize the most effective message retrieval and representation methods on AAC devices for individuals with TBI.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 69 - Voice Banking to Create VOCAs for Patients With Degenerative Diseases

Victoria Weiss, BS, University of Central Missouri Supervisor: Gregory Turner, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri

This poster presentation will highlight the challenges associated with using a synthetic voice, such as those in Voice Output Communication Aids (VOCAs), to replace the human voice. VOCAs can be used to replace the human voice in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), but the voice must be perceptually acceptable to the user (Ahmad Khan et al., 2011). If the range of voices available on the VOCAs is considered unacceptable to the user, they are more likely to abandon it (Creer, Cunningham, Green & Yamagishi, 2013). In addition, embarrassment over the sound of one’s own voice can cause a reduction in socialization (Miller, Noble, Jones & Burn, 2006). Developing synthetic voices with natural prosody has proven difficult (Fernandez, et al, 2014). One potential solution for those who reject VOCAs is voice banking. Voice banking can be used to develop personalized VOCAs for those with degenerative disorders prior to voice deterioration (Veuax, Yamagishi & King, 2012). Information will be shared regarding the process of voice banking, and its application toward AAC for clients with degenerative diseases.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify challenges associated with using a synthetic voice, describe the difficulties of creating a synthetic voice which is natural sounding, identify how voice banking can be applied toward AAC for clients with degenerative diseases.

Level of Learning: Introductory

SP 70 - Effects of Education on Swimmers' Knowledge of Respiratory Disorders

Abigail Ohlms, Truman State University; Janessa Richardson, Truman State University Supervisor: Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

The purpose of this research was to assess the effects of a Vocal Cord Dysfunction (VCD) education program among competitive, collegiate swimmers. Twenty-five to 50 competitive swimmers will be asked to complete a pretest, which will assess their existing knowledge of any respiratory issues they have experienced and medical treatment they have received. In addition, they will be asked different questions about facts and treatment issues related to Vocal Cord Dysfunction. Questions will be typified by items such as “Asthma and Vocal Cord Dysfunction are the same respiratory issue: True or False” and “Vocal Cord Dysfunction is located in the lower part of the respiratory system: True or False.” After gathering the data from the pre-test, an education plan will be created to inform the participants of the symptoms and treatment options available for Vocal Cord Dysfunction in the form of a presentation and informational pamphlet. After the information seminar, the same 25-50 participants will complete a post-test assessing their knowledge of VCD and the treatment options to see how effective the education program was. Data will be analyzed to determine if any significant gains in knowledge of respiratory disorders, specifically VCD, will occur after education.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify VCD like symptoms, recall basic outpatient breathing exercises and strategies, differentiate between VCD and commonly confused respiratory disorders.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 71 - SNF Nurses' Knowledge of Tracheostomy and Laryngectomy

Georgia Gettys, Truman State University; Sienna Pace, Truman State University Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

The purpose of this research is to determine the knowledge and competency/comfort levels of nurses in skilled nursing and other long-term care facilities on knowledge of tracheostomy and laryngectomy patients. We will distribute a link to a survey via email to a cohort of nurses based on their work setting. We will primarily be targeting nurses working in skilled nursing facilities in rural Missouri. The survey will address demographic variables such as years of experience, how long worked in the skilled nursing setting, coursework specific to laryngectomy and tracheostomy care. The survey will also address individuals’ competency/comfort level in caring for tracheostomized and larygectomized patients; knowledge of the components of a tracheostomy (inner versus outer cannula, cuffed versus uncuffed); and, accessories used by laryngectomy patient such as lary tube, Heat Moisture Exchange cartridge, Tracheo-esophageal puncture. Data will be analyzed for patterns in how certain demographic variables relate to comfort level/competency level. If they have worked in other settings, perhaps their comfort level will be higher.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the anatomical difference between a tracheotomy and a laryngectomy, identify the reported level of comfort/competence among nurses regarding laryngectomy and tracheotomy in the SNF setting, understand the value of educating nursing staff in the SNF setting about swallowing and airway management in these populations.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

SP 72 - Does Teacher Knowledge Affect their Language Use in Preschool Classrooms?s

Ellen Cook, St. Louis University Supervisor: Sara Steele, PhD, CCC-SLP, St. Louis University

The purpose of this research was to determine if there were certain activities that college students participate in, which predict presence of glottal fry. Participants were asked to complete demographic surveys, items related to activities on a college campus, a survey related to vocal habits, and an informal personality quiz. (The first two tools were designed by the researchers while the second pair of tools were adapted from published works.) Conversational samples and reading samples for each participant were subjectively evaluated for presence of glottal fry. Data collected was evaluated for participation patterns and/or personality traits that best predicted presence of glottal fry. Data analysis was not available prior to this submission deadline, but will be completed before the convention. Results will be verbally and graphically portrayed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to discuss the importance of teacher language on children's language development, identify themes of teacher's knowledge of language and literacy development, express how teacher's educational level may affect their language use.

Level of Learning: Introductory

 
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