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MSHA Convention Recordings 2017

(available until April 1, 2018)

Cleft Palate and Resonance Disorders: Myths, Legends, Best Practices

Feeding the Medically Complex Pediatric Patient

Building Bridges Through Collaboration: Effective Practices for Speech-Language Pathologists and Behavior Analysts

What Variables Predict Social Communication and What Can We Do?

Cleft Palate and Resonance Disorders: Myths, Legends, Best Practices - 2 hours

Presented by Lynn Marty Grames, MA, CCC-SLP, St. Louis Children's Hospital, Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Institute; Mary Blount Stahl, MA, CCC-SLP, St. Louis Children's Hospital, Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Institute

Among practicing speech-language pathologists, there exists a wide range of beliefs and practice patterns concerning individuals with resonance disorder, or those born with cleft lip/palate or craniofacial differences. This is likely related to variability in the education of speech pathologists in these areas, and to limited practicum experiences available for clinicians-in-training. This session presents a variety of beliefs and practices that have been encountered at a cleft palate treatment center treating patients from a large geographic area. Two cleft palate speech specialists will discuss the veracity of each belief or practice. The evidence to support or refute the ideas and current best practice standards will be reviewed. Evaluation and therapy techniques that can easily be adapted to school, private practice or early intervention settings will be reviewed. Collaboration with the treating medical team will be discussed and encouraged.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe conditions which can be treated with therapy, and those which cannot be treated with therapy, identify at least three common misconceptions regarding care for individuals with cleft lip/palate, describe a method for distinguishing articulation disorder from resonance disorder.

 

Webinar fee is $25

Register


Continuing Education

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This program is offered for .2 CEUs
(Intermediate level, Professional area)

Speaker Disclosure:

Financial Disclosure: Lynn Marty Grames draws salary from St. Louis Children's Hospital, Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Institute in part through the provision of evaluation and treatment for individuals with cleft palate and resonance disorders.
Non-Financial Disclosure: Lynn Marty Grames has no relevant non-financial relationships to disclose.

Financial Disclosure: Mary Blount Stahl has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.
Non-Financial Disclosure: Mary Blount Stahl has no relevant non-financial relationships to disclose.

Feeding the Medically Complex Pediatric Patient - 2 hours

Presented by Brenda Sitzmann, MA, CCC-SLP, Children's Mercy Hospital

Feeding difficulties are often the result of multiple factors including medical concerns, feeding skill deficits and behavioral concerns. During this session we will explore the impact of medical concerns such as NG/g-tube/j-tube feedings, eosinophilic esophagitis, tracheostomy, laryngomalacia, tracheomalacia and laryngeal cleft on oral intake in the pediatric population. Clinical feeding evaluation and feeding therapy techniques to address these concerns will be discussed and demonstrated.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify five medical conditions that may impact oral feedings in the pediatric population, discuss the impact of non-oral feedings on oral intake, demonstrate knowledge of five evaluation and therapy techniques to improve feeding skills in medical complex pediatric patients.

 

Webinar fee is $25

Register


Continuing Education

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This program is offered for .2 CEUs
(Intermediate level, Professional area)

Speaker Disclosure:

Financial Disclosure: Brenda Sitzmann is receiving an honorarium from the Missouri Speech Language Hearing Association for this presentation. She is also employed by Children's Mercy Hospital which will be mentioned during the presentation.
Non-Financial Disclosure: Brenda Sitzmann has no relevant non-financial relationships to disclose.

Building Bridges Through Collaboration: Effective Practices for Speech-Language Pathologists and Behavior Analysts - 2 hours

Presented by Nancy Champlin, MS, BCBA, ACI Learning Centers

Professionals collaborate to improve the long-term outcomes of their mutual clients. This collaboration across disciplines is often viewed as a requirement, rather than mutual consent. Speech-language pathologists and behavior analysts, as well as other professionals, can and should build solid and enduring bridges of professional collaboration. The issue does not stem from what information is distributed, but rather the how and why of the dissemination. This presentation will highlight the instructor’s successful professional relationships across multiple disciplines. In an effort to formulate a reproducible action plan for effective collaboration, the presenter also interviewed several prominent speech-language pathologists to seek out their professional opinions on the aspects of what has made collaboration ineffective. These inadequacies dictate what should become our stepping stones to building solid bridges of collaboration.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to differentiate effective and ineffective communication strategies during collaboration, recall 10 points that can make collaboration ineffective, identify positive talking points to make collaboration across all disciplines effective.

 

Webinar fee is $25

Register


Continuing Education

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This program is offered for .2 CEUs
(Introductory level, Professional area)

Speaker Disclosure:

Financial Disclosure: Nancy Champlin is receiving an honorarium and travel support from the Missouri Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Non-Financial Disclosure: Nancy Champlin has no relevant non-financial relationships to disclose.

What Variables Predict Social Communication and What Can We Do? - 1 hour

Presented by Deborah Hwa-Froelich, PhD, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

Social communication involves interpretation of facial expressions, identification of mental and emotional states and recognition/expression of pragmatic language. Several researchers have documented that children with language delay or impairment have difficulty with emotion identification, social understanding and pragmatic language. For example, in longitudinal studies of children with a history of language impairment, poorer language competence was related to behavioral, emotional and social problems. More specific research found that children with language impairment had difficulty with identifying emotions from facial expressions and knowing when to disclose or hide their feelings. In addition, research with children described as late talkers indicated they also have difficulty with pragmatic language. While language competence is an important skill for social communication, exposure to social interactions with adults and older children is also important. The literature is unequivocal that social interactions with adults and older siblings are important for the development of social understanding. Researchers have also found that children who were exposed to adverse early care have difficulty with behavior and emotion regulation as well as emotion identification and social understanding. Practitioners serving children with language delay/impairment and social communication problems need to address both needs. Given the limited time available for practitioners to serve their ever-growing caseloads, a language and social-based intervention model would be most efficient. In this session, predictive variables for social communication competence and an evidence-based language and social communication intervention model will be described.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to understand the relationship between language competence and social communication, describe the importance of early social interactions with adults and older siblings in developing social communication competence, plan language-and social-based interventions for individuals with social communication needs.

 

Webinar fee is $25

Register


Continuing Education

logo
This program is offered for .1 CEU
(Introductory level, Professional area)

Speaker Disclosure:

Financial Disclosure: Deborah Hwa-Froelich receives royalties from Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company and Psychology Press for two books, Supporting development in internationally adopted children and Social communication development and disorders. She also receives a salary from Saint Louis University.
Non-Financial Disclosure: Deborah Hwa-Froelich has no relevant non-financial relationships to disclose.

 

 

 

Page last updated July 6, 2017

 
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