Convention Recordings

MSHA Convention Recordings

MSHA 2020 Convention Recordings available June 20 – September 20, 2020

Pricing: $97 for members | $177 for non-members | Free for students

By purchasing the package, you will have access to all recorded presentations. The recordings are separated into tracks for your ease of navigating which recordings you would like to watch.

Online Registration (with credit card payment)

 

Tracks

Clinical | Educational | Ethics | Student Technical Sessions | Student Poster Presentations | Continuing Education

Clinical Track

S1 - Ask MSHA

Patricia Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, MSHA President; Jacob Gutshall, MHS, CCC-SLP, MSHA Past President; Heather Lazarides, MHA, MS CCC-SLP, BCS-S, MSHA President-Elect and Vice President for Clinical Services; Julie Ann Palmer, MSHA Vice President for Professional and Public Relations; Jennifer Stevenson, MHS, Eds, CCC-SLP, MSHA Vice President for Communications; Kim Stewart, MS, CCC-SLP, MSHA Vice President for School Services; Saneta Thurmon, MA, CCC-SLP/A, MSHA Vice President for Audiology; Greta Hull, MHS, CCC-SLP, MSHA Vice President for Legislative Affairs; Brent Hemphill, MSHA Lobbyist; Julie Meyer, MSHA Graduate Student Board Member; Shannon Locke, MS, CCC-SLP, MSHA 2020 Convention Planning Team Chair; Marion Passalinqua, MSHA Account Manager

This session will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of MSHA Executive Board members and ASHA Advisory Council to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate level training programs, state licensure requirements and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s (DESE) implementer model. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Participants will be given an opportunity to ask questions and to contribute to the discussion.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Restate two main points from the presenter’s ideas or research
• Cite two resources for further research on the topics presented
• Articulate one way they could apply this new research or clinical practice in their work setting.

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Introductory

S2 - Advocacy, Leadership and Empowerment: Strategies for Member Success in Missouri

Theresa Rodgers, MA, CCC-SLP, ASHA-F, EdS (LD), SLP, Consulting Services

This session will focus on skill development in advocacy, leadership and volunteerism related to the professions of audiology and speech-language pathology. ASHA’s 2020 President will discuss strategies for successful advocacy and ways to become involved at various levels. Issues in ASHA’s Public Policy Agenda (PPA) including health care, schools, professional practice and workforce topics, will be highlighted. Mechanisms for utilization of ASHA resources to achieve favorable outcomes for members and consumers in Missouri will also be delineated.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Delineate three legislative and/or regulatory advocacy issues important to audiologists and speech-language pathologists
• Describe one method members can use to instantly take action on issues using the ASHA website as well as one additional advocacy strategy
• Discuss three components of the Practice Portal

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Introductory

S4 - SHORT COURSE: Keep it Practical: Developing Executive Function Skills in Adolescents and Adults

Sarah Ward, MS, CCC-SLP, Cognitive Connections, LLP

Do you have clients who are disorganized, may not have the materials they need or even turn in the work they have completed? Is their desk a black hole for papers and materials? Do you observe clients who struggle to stop and read the room and meet the demands of the situation? Or, clients who struggle to initiate complex academic assignments/tasks, procrastinate and then run out of time to do their best work? Are they constantly multitasking, so tasks/assignment take twice as long as they should? Does it seem they have an inability to breakdown the demands of an assignment and have a sense of how to start? Do you struggle with your own executive function-based challenges? When planning, we envision the future and then sequence, prioritize and organize the steps to achieve a future plan. Essentially, we do what is a called a ‘mental dress rehearsal’ to envision what the task will look like and to pre-experience how we will move through space and time to achieve this future goal. If clients struggle with executive function skills they often rely on a parent or teacher to talk them through the steps of the task and alert them to the time constraints. This is a 10 percent theory and 90 percent practical strategies presentation! Teach adolescents and adults how to independently break down and initiate tasks, see and sense the passage of time, manage long term projects, minimize procrastination and improve self monitoring to stay on task.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• State the functional working definition of what is meant by the term executive function skillsas it pertains to therapeutic interventions
• Develop an intervention program to foster a student’s ability to form more independent executive function skills by describing therapeutic activities to improve task planning, task initiation and transition within and between tasks
• State four interventions that can be used to teach a student to actively self-manage the factors related to the passage of time

3 hours | 0.30 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Intermediate

S5 - SHORT COURSE: From Play to Planning: Developing Executive Function Skills in Young Learners Pre-K - Grade 5

Sarah Ward, MS, CCC-SLP, Cognitive Connections, LLP

Executive function skills allow us to manage our attention, our emotions and our behavior in pursuit of our goals. Young children rely on these skills to follow a sequence of instructions for daily tasks while older children need these skills to break a task down into a sequence of steps and organize a timeline as the demands for independent learning increases. When children enter the academic arena, successful task execution requires students to be aware of task demands and set goals. Then, they must access forethought and hindsight to think in an organized way and to sustain their focus on the relevant features of the task. As students mature, they learn how to organize their time, space, materials and develop the reasoning skills to consider solutions to problems. This is a practical strategies seminar! First learn how to clearly define what the executive function skills are for the purpose of determining the most effective treatment interventions. Understand the development of the executive function skills and what is meant by the term executive dysfunction. You will learn dozens of functional, ready-to-use strategies for teaching students how to self-initiate, to transition to the next task and to control their impulses and emotions to successfully self regulate to complete a task. Teach students to sense the passage of time and carry out routines and tasks within allotted time frames. Learn how to use the Get Ready – Do – Done Model to turn the lesson/treatment plans into powerful tools to teach students executive control skills.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the product Cognitive Connections Time Tracker and Get Ready Do Done Materials.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• State the functional working definition of what is meant by the term executive function skillsas it pertains to therapeutic interventions.
• Identify what is the typical developmental course of the executive function skills.
• Describe at least four systematic ways to adapt play skills to teach students self-regulation, forethought, task planning and time management.
• List three interventions to teach a student how to visualize complex tasks and then sequence and plan the requisite steps to complete assigned work.

3 hours | 0.30 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

S7 - Hearing Aids: Addressing Barriers to Action to Improve Daily Management

Karen Muñoz, EdD, Utah State University

Challenges with daily hearing aid use and management can be experienced by patients of all ages. Patients’ appropriately strong emotions, fears and personal struggles are factors that may inadvertently interfere with their engagement with audiologists. Providing services within a person-centered care framework provides audiologists with the opportunity to comprehensively understand patient challenges, values and goals—essential for supporting patient ability to overcome challenges and improve daily management. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based approach and is commonly used in health care to support health-related behavior change (Rollnick, Miller & Butler, 2008). MI can be used to help patients and parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing address barriers to intervention including feelings of ambivalence they may be experiencing. MI is a style of communication that can be woven into provider-patient/parent interactions and is based on the conceptualization that people go through stages of change (i.e., precontemplative, contemplative, preparation, action, maintenance) when faced with chronic health concerns. A core feature of MI is tailoring intervention to stage of change. MI is a process and typically occurs over a period of months. This session will describe how audiologists can partner with patients/parents to address barriers to action to improve daily management. Attendees will have opportunities to learn through case-based scenarios.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe reasons audiologists need to identify and address internal barriers to hearing aid uptake and effective daily management
• Describe the benefits of incorporating motivational interviewing skills in audiology services
• Describe skills needed to conduct change-oriented interviews and to motivate action towards effective daily hearing health management

0.5 hours | 0.05 CEUs

Track: Audiology Level: Intermediate

S8 - Pediatric Hearing Loss: Partnering With Parents to Optimize Outcomes

Karen Muñoz, EdD, Utah State University

Through effective provider-parent partnerships, audiologists and speech-language pathologists can help parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing recognize barriers to intervention and identify effective solutions. Parents can experience a variety of barriers. Many parents are unfamiliar with hearing loss and may have internal barriers (e.g., accepting the hearing loss diagnosis, feeling sad or lacking confidence about how to manage the technology) in addition to external barriers (e.g., financial concerns, lack of a support network). To effectively help parents, audiologists and speech-language pathologists need to counsel each family according to their unique needs by assessing for and addressing internal and external barriers that are interfering with the intervention process. Effective partnerships can help parents engage in shared decision-making and work through challenges that arise. This session will describe communication skills that support your ability to obtain a comprehensive understanding of parent values, goals and barriers. Resources will be shared to promote partnerships with parents.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe common barriers parents experience that interfere with treatment adherence
• Describe person-centered communication attitudes and skills to engage parents
• List three parent-professional partnership resources to help optimize child outcomes

1.5 hours | 0.15 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest, Audiology Level: Intermediate

S9 - Speech Sound Disorder Treatment Implementation: Intensity and Effective Teaching Methods

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

Much of the research on treatment of speech sound disorders (SSD) focuses on how to select sounds for treatment so that maximum gains are made. However, learning in treatment is critical to the success of any intervention program, which raises practical questions: How much treatment is enough? What does good progress look like? How in the world am I going to teach this child to correctly articulate X (insert any terrifying late acquired sound, especially the dreaded /r/). This session will review the evidence on treatment intensity and treatment progress. In addition, various resources that provide guidance on teaching different complex sounds will be shared. The audience will be welcome to share their tips, too!

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe treatment intensity
• Evaluate the evidence related to treatment intensity for children with SSD
• Identify key resources for effectively teaching complex speech sounds

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

S10 - The Complexity Approach to Speech Sound Disorder Treatment: Sound Selection

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

Children with speech-sound disorders make up a large portion of the caseload for school-based SLPs who work with students ages three to seven. But SLPs rarely use the complexity approach in treating these children due to a lack of familiarity with the approach, despite the evidence to support its use. This presentation will review the evidence demonstrating the efficacy of the complexity approach and will walk clinicians through sound selection within this approach. Specific elements of sound selection that will be reviewed are: characteristics of the sounds (i.e., developmental norms and language universals); characteristics of the child’s speech (i.e., accuracy and stimulability). The presenter will use case studies to illustrate how to select complex treatment targets. This presentation will build on the presenter’s open access tutorial on this same topic: https://doi.org/10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0082. Attendees do not need to read the tutorial in advance of attending the presentation.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the child and sound characteristics that make targets complex
• Assess these child and sound characteristics in children on their caseload
• Utilize assessment information to select complex targets for individual children

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

S11 - Paired Treatment Approaches for Speech Sound Disorders: Minimal Pair, Maximal Opposition, Multiple Opposition

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

There are numerous evidence-based treatment approaches for preschool and school-age children with speech-sound disorders. This session will review three approaches to selecting and contrasting two or more sounds during speech-sound disorder treatment: minimal pair (misarticulated sound paired with its typical substitution), maximal opposition (two misarticulated sounds that differ greatly from one another) and multiple opposition (multiple misarticulated sounds that are all replaced within the same substitute). The evidence supporting each treatment approach will be reviewed. Sound selection will be illustrated using hypothetical clinical cases. Through these examples, clinicians will gain an understanding of what children each approach is appropriate for.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Develop a treatment plan based on a traditional minimal pair approach
• Develop a treatment plan based on a maximal opposition/empty set treatment approach
• Develop a treatment plan based on a multiple opposition treatment approach

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs
Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

S12 - Selecting Treatment Words to Boost Learning of Speech Sounds

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

What do words have to do with it? Traditionally, we have thought of treatment words as just an unimportant vehicle for teaching sounds to preschool and school-age children with speech sound disorders: an inactive ingredient of therapy. Emerging evidence suggests that treatment words matter and can facilitate sound learning. This session will review the characteristics of words that seem to boost speech sound learning: word frequency, neighborhood density and age-of-acquisition of the word. In addition, will consider the role of nonwords in treatment of speech sound disorders. Resources for selecting real words and nonwords will be shared. This presentation will build on the presenter’s open access tutorial on this same topic: https://doi.org/10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0080. Attendees do not need to read the tutorial in advance of attending the presentation.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe real-word characteristics that influence speech sound learning
• Select real words or nonwords to facilitate speech sound learning
• Implement a nonword approach to speech sound treatment

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

S13 - More Than a Test Score: Functional Assessment and Goal-Setting

Sarah Baar, MA, CCC-SLP, Honeycomb Speech Therapy

Person-centered care is newly emphasized as a best practice in general health care as well as speech-language pathology. However, this approach contrasts significantly with the previously emphasized medical model and impairment-based testing and goals. Assessment and goal setting are fundamental steps in shaping a therapist’s treatment for a highly-meaningful and person-centered approach. This course uses best practices, evidence and practical ideas to describe a person-centered assessment model and functional goal-writing frameworks for the adult neurogenic population, with practical examples from speech-language pathology across settings, from acute care to home health to outpatient therapy.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List four person-centered outcomes (PCO’s) that can be used to measure participation/activity.
• Utilize three evidence-based frameworks to write person-centered, measureable goals.
• Describe three components of a person-centered assessment that comply with best practice and set the stage for a person-centered approach in speech therapy.

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs
Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Introductory

S14 - Vestibular Disorders and Diagnostic Guidelines

Julie Honaker, PhD, CCC-A, Cleveland Clinic

Historically, interpretation of vestibular disorders in the audiology clinic has fit within a peripheral versus central vestibulopathy categories. However, advances in our understanding of the complexities of the vestibular system, along with new diagnostic guidelines allow audiologists to provide more detailed descriptions of complex case histories and clinical testing, which should lead to improved management and patient outcomes. This presentation will provide a case-by-case approach to understanding typical and atypical vestibular disorders.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify clinical signs and symptoms associated with typical and atypical vestibular disorders
• Recognize vestibular assesssment patterns in typical and atypical vestibular disorders
• Reference diagnostic criteria for typical and atypical vestibular disorders

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs

Track: Audiology Level: Intermediate

S15 - Vestibular Assessment Across the Lifespan

Julie Honaker, PhD, CCC-A, Cleveland Clinic

VEMP, VNG, VHIT and more! This intermediate presentation will provide a comprehensive overview of the vestibular test battery and clinical practice guidelines for what measures to include and when. The importance of considering findings of the entire test battery to determine normal versus abnormal and peripheral versus central etiology will be presented. Case examples will be provided on patients across the lifespan.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify best-practice protocols for assessing patients in the vestibular clinic
• Discuss current trends in vestibular testing, including VEMP, VHIT and Risk of Falling Assessment
• Name essential componets of the vestibular test report

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs

Track: Audiology Level: Intermediate

S16 - President's Celebration: From Education to Invitation

Sarah Buffie, MSW, LSW, Soul Bird Consulting

How might we begin to see ourselves as co-creators versus care takers? How might we offer a felt sense of feeling safe, seen and heard? Sometimes our role as professionals leaves little room for the personal. In this session we will be exploring a lens that invites personalism over professionalism as a way to reimagine our role in the lives of those we support.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the services of Soul Bird Consulting.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the magitutde of social isolation for those with devalued labels.
• Recall Belonging as a central resilience factor.
• Differentiate between services/supports and roles/resilience.

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Introductory

S17 - Taking Care: Resilience for Professionals

Sarah Buffie, MSW, LSW, Soul Bird Consulting

We know that growing resilience mitigates the effects of trauma. However, supporting someone else without building your OWN resilience can be challenging. In this session participants will grow in their understanding of nourishing their own resilience. Together we will engage in activities that integrate the mind and the body. The experiential nature of the afternoon will invite introspection as well as connection with others as a way to foster nourishment and well-being.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify ways to grow their own resilience.
• Engage in interactive exercises that integrate the mind and body.
• Identify ways to return to a state of balance and calm to reach states of regulation.

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Intermediate

S18 - Literacy and Justice for ALL: Culturally Responsive Practices for SLPs in Literacy

Shurita Thomas-Tate, PhD, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University

In our increasingly diverse schools, culturally responsive practices support the achievement of ALL students by providing services that acknowledge and appropriately respond to the intersection of cultural needs that we and our students bring to interactions. One area that the speech-language pathologist (SLP) can make a huge impact in is literacy. Literacy is foundational to learning in the schools. Unfortunately, disparities in literacy outcomes has been a source of great educational disparity that directly correlates with future success and quality of life. However, literacy also has the potential to be a great source of equity when delivered in ways that values students’ cultures and identities. SLPs can and should be involved the prevention, assessment and intervention of literacy-based skills. SLPs can be agents of change for their students by helping student develop as readers, which can potentially change the trajectory of their lives. This presentation aims to provide participants with practical information about the context and nature of culturally responsive practices in literacy development.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the product Ujima Language and Literacy.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define cultural-responsiveness and associated terms
• Examine their cultural identities and stages of cultural responsiveness and develop a plan for growth
• Discuss the relationships between literacy and educational equity
• Apply culturally responsive practices to prevention, assessment and intervention of literacy skills

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

S19 - The SLP and Dyslexia: Principles, Content and Methods for Lesson Planning

Eva Trumbower, MS, CCC-SLP, Consultant, Center for Family Policy and Research, University of Missouri

It is clear that the SLP plays a critical role in the assessment and treatment for children with speech-language disorders and, more recently, there is evidence that the SLP has a significant role in assessment and intervention for children with written language difficulties including dyslexia. Knowledge of language systems and structure provides the SLP the opportunity to contribute to the improvement of literacy. In this session, the characteristics of dyslexia, comorbidity with disorders of speech and language and supporting principles, content and methods for intervention planning will be emphasized. Guidance from ASHA, the International Dyslexia Association, the International Literacy Association, the Center for Effective Reading Instruction, state and national standards for English Language Arts will be referenced.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• State the defining characteristics of written language disorders including dyslexia.
• Describe principles, content and methods of instruction for students with oral and written language disorders.
• Develop lesson plans for students based on the principles, content and methods for effective and supportive intervention for students demonstrating oral and written language disorders.
• Define the knowledge-base of the SLP in language and literacy learning and determine what additional knowledge is needed in the written modality.

3 hours | 0.30 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

S20 - Person-Centered Care: Mentoring Skill Development in the Clinic Environment

Karen Muñoz, EdD, Utah State University

Person-centered care (PCC) is considered a hallmark of quality healthcare. When individuals have autonomy in their care through joint decision-making that respects their values and priorities, they have better outcomes. Research shows that when professionals engage in PCC, individuals/families adhere better to healthcare recommendations, they are more satisfied with their health care and they engage in more consistent effective self-management. Providing PCC requires audiologists and speech-language pathologists to use counseling skills intentionally as they communicate with clients and their families; however, many practicing professionals have not had training in PCC limiting the extent PCC is intentionally integrated in clinical encounters. This session will discuss attitudes, knowledge and skills that support PCC communication and describe mentoring strategies that support implementation of PCC communication in practice.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the role person-centered care communication plays in clinical outcomes
• List three strategies to promote person-centered care during clinical encounters
• Describe performance feedback approaches to promote skill development

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

S21 - Tips, Tricks and Tools to Bring LPAA Into Your Therapy

Sarah Baar, MA, CCC-SLP, Honeycomb Speech Therapy

The Life Participation Approach to Aphasia (LPAA) is consistent with a person-centered care treatment model in speech therapy. This presentation focuses on how the clinical SLP can use the LPAA in language therapy from day one, with a focus on treating the language impairment.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List two tools you could use during your Assessment to promote a Life Participation Approach.
• Identify five categories that could be used to develop personally-relevant stimuli for language therapy
• List three components a home program should contain to promote participation and improvement.

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Introductory

S22 - BPPV or What Could It Be?

Julie Honaker, PhD, CCC-A, Cleveland Clinic

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is notably the most common peripheral vestibular disorder in adults. What about atypical BPPV presentation? What variations are possible and what does not fit a pattern for BPPV? Are there central pathologies that mimic BPPV? This presentation aims to provide the range of BPPV presentation in order to understand what should and should not be included as a BPPV diagnosis. This presentation will also describe updated treatment techniques for atypical BPPV presentation. Hands-on instruction will be provided on how to diagnosis and treat BPPV.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify typical and atypical BPPV presentation patterns
• Identify central anomalies in patients presenting with positional vertigo
• Demonstrate techniques to diagnose and treat BPPV

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs

Track: Audiology Level: Intermediate

Educational Track

S1 - Ask MSHA

Patricia Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, MSHA President; Jacob Gutshall, MHS, CCC-SLP, MSHA Past President; Heather Lazarides, MHA, MS CCC-SLP, BCS-S, MSHA President-Elect and Vice President for Clinical Services; Julie Ann Palmer, MSHA Vice President for Professional and Public Relations; Jennifer Stevenson, MHS, Eds, CCC-SLP, MSHA Vice President for Communications; Kim Stewart, MS, CCC-SLP, MSHA Vice President for School Services; Saneta Thurmon, MA, CCC-SLP/A, MSHA Vice President for Audiology; Greta Hull, MHS, CCC-SLP, MSHA Vice President for Legislative Affairs; Brent Hemphill, MSHA Lobbyist; Julie Meyer, MSHA Graduate Student Board Member; Shannon Locke, MS, CCC-SLP, MSHA 2020 Convention Planning Team Chair; Marion Passalinqua, MSHA Account Manager

This session will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of MSHA Executive Board members and ASHA Advisory Council to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate level training programs, state licensure requirements and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s (DESE) implementer model. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Participants will be given an opportunity to ask questions and to contribute to the discussion.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Restate two main points from the presenter’s ideas or research
• Cite two resources for further research on the topics presented
• Articulate one way they could apply this new research or clinical practice in their work setting.

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Introductory

S2 - Advocacy, Leadership and Empowerment: Strategies for Member Success in Missouri

Theresa Rodgers, MA, CCC-SLP, ASHA-F, EdS (LD), SLP, Consulting Services

This session will focus on skill development in advocacy, leadership and volunteerism related to the professions of audiology and speech-language pathology. ASHA’s 2020 President will discuss strategies for successful advocacy and ways to become involved at various levels. Issues in ASHA’s Public Policy Agenda (PPA) including health care, schools, professional practice and workforce topics, will be highlighted. Mechanisms for utilization of ASHA resources to achieve favorable outcomes for members and consumers in Missouri will also be delineated.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Delineate three legislative and/or regulatory advocacy issues important to audiologists and speech-language pathologists
• Describe one method members can use to instantly take action on issues using the ASHA website as well as one additional advocacy strategy
• Discuss three components of the Practice Portal

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Introductory

S3 - The Role and Function of Speech-Language Pathologists Within a School Multi-Tier System of Supports (MTSS)

Steven Beldin, MA, Missouri Council of Administrators of Special Education (MO-CASE)

A Multi-Tier System of Supports (MTSS) in schools is a prevention-oriented framework intended to increase the likelihood that all students, including students with disabilities and special needs, will make expected progress toward curriculum standards and indicators. Speech-language pathologists have skills and competencies that can be applied effectively within the context of an MTSS to improve student outcomes. This presentation will provide a description and explanation of a viable MTSS structure and process, including the roles and functions of speech-language pathologists.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the essential components and processes of a viable Multi-Tier System of Supports (MTSS) framework.
• Describe the roles and functions of speech-language pathologists in an MTSS structure and process driven by response to instruction and intervention data.
• Identify and access resources and guidance for effective development and implementation of a viable MTSS

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

S4 - SHORT COURSE: Keep it Practical: Developing Executive Function Skills in Adolescents and Adults

Sarah Ward, MS, CCC-SLP, Cognitive Connections, LLP

Do you have clients who are disorganized, may not have the materials they need or even turn in the work they have completed? Is their desk a black hole for papers and materials? Do you observe clients who struggle to stop and read the room and meet the demands of the situation? Or, clients who struggle to initiate complex academic assignments/tasks, procrastinate and then run out of time to do their best work? Are they constantly multitasking, so tasks/assignment take twice as long as they should? Does it seem they have an inability to breakdown the demands of an assignment and have a sense of how to start? Do you struggle with your own executive function-based challenges? When planning, we envision the future and then sequence, prioritize and organize the steps to achieve a future plan. Essentially, we do what is a called a ‘mental dress rehearsal’ to envision what the task will look like and to pre-experience how we will move through space and time to achieve this future goal. If clients struggle with executive function skills they often rely on a parent or teacher to talk them through the steps of the task and alert them to the time constraints. This is a 10 percent theory and 90 percent practical strategies presentation! Teach adolescents and adults how to independently break down and initiate tasks, see and sense the passage of time, manage long term projects, minimize procrastination and improve self monitoring to stay on task.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• State the functional working definition of what is meant by the term executive function skillsas it pertains to therapeutic interventions
• Develop an intervention program to foster a student’s ability to form more independent executive function skills by describing therapeutic activities to improve task planning, task initiation and transition within and between tasks
• State four interventions that can be used to teach a student to actively self-manage the factors related to the passage of time

3 hours | 0.30 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Intermediate

S5 - SHORT COURSE: From Play to Planning: Developing Executive Function Skills in Young Learners Pre-K - Grade 5

Sarah Ward, MS, CCC-SLP, Cognitive Connections, LLP

Executive function skills allow us to manage our attention, our emotions and our behavior in pursuit of our goals. Young children rely on these skills to follow a sequence of instructions for daily tasks while older children need these skills to break a task down into a sequence of steps and organize a timeline as the demands for independent learning increases. When children enter the academic arena, successful task execution requires students to be aware of task demands and set goals. Then, they must access forethought and hindsight to think in an organized way and to sustain their focus on the relevant features of the task. As students mature, they learn how to organize their time, space, materials and develop the reasoning skills to consider solutions to problems. This is a practical strategies seminar! First learn how to clearly define what the executive function skills are for the purpose of determining the most effective treatment interventions. Understand the development of the executive function skills and what is meant by the term executive dysfunction. You will learn dozens of functional, ready-to-use strategies for teaching students how to self-initiate, to transition to the next task and to control their impulses and emotions to successfully self regulate to complete a task. Teach students to sense the passage of time and carry out routines and tasks within allotted time frames. Learn how to use the Get Ready – Do – Done Model to turn the lesson/treatment plans into powerful tools to teach students executive control skills.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the product Cognitive Connections Time Tracker and Get Ready Do Done Materials.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• State the functional working definition of what is meant by the term executive function skillsas it pertains to therapeutic interventions.
• Identify what is the typical developmental course of the executive function skills.
• Describe at least four systematic ways to adapt play skills to teach students self-regulation, forethought, task planning and time management.
• List three interventions to teach a student how to visualize complex tasks and then sequence and plan the requisite steps to complete assigned work.

3 hours | 0.30 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

S6 - Dyslexia Screening, the Science and the Next Steps

Kim Stuckey, MEd, Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE)

As of 2018, yearly dyslexia screenings for all students grades kindergarten to third grade are mandated. This session will review characteristics of dyslexia, what skills should be screened as most predictive of reading risk, what the latest brain research indicates about reading acquisition and how to use screening data to inform instructional decisions.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Review mandate requirements.
• Identify the language development centers of the brain necessary for skilled reading.
• Determine effective instructional needs for students at risk.

1.5 hours | 0.15 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

S7 - Hearing Aids: Addressing Barriers to Action to Improve Daily Management

Karen Muñoz, EdD, Utah State University

Challenges with daily hearing aid use and management can be experienced by patients of all ages. Patients’ appropriately strong emotions, fears and personal struggles are factors that may inadvertently interfere with their engagement with audiologists. Providing services within a person-centered care framework provides audiologists with the opportunity to comprehensively understand patient challenges, values and goals—essential for supporting patient ability to overcome challenges and improve daily management. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based approach and is commonly used in health care to support health-related behavior change (Rollnick, Miller & Butler, 2008). MI can be used to help patients and parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing address barriers to intervention including feelings of ambivalence they may be experiencing. MI is a style of communication that can be woven into provider-patient/parent interactions and is based on the conceptualization that people go through stages of change (i.e., precontemplative, contemplative, preparation, action, maintenance) when faced with chronic health concerns. A core feature of MI is tailoring intervention to stage of change. MI is a process and typically occurs over a period of months. This session will describe how audiologists can partner with patients/parents to address barriers to action to improve daily management. Attendees will have opportunities to learn through case-based scenarios.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe reasons audiologists need to identify and address internal barriers to hearing aid uptake and effective daily management
• Describe the benefits of incorporating motivational interviewing skills in audiology services
• Describe skills needed to conduct change-oriented interviews and to motivate action towards effective daily hearing health management

0.5 hours | 0.05 CEUs

Track: Audiology Level: Intermediate

S8 - Pediatric Hearing Loss: Partnering With Parents to Optimize Outcomes

Karen Muñoz, EdD, Utah State University

Through effective provider-parent partnerships, audiologists and speech-language pathologists can help parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing recognize barriers to intervention and identify effective solutions. Parents can experience a variety of barriers. Many parents are unfamiliar with hearing loss and may have internal barriers (e.g., accepting the hearing loss diagnosis, feeling sad or lacking confidence about how to manage the technology) in addition to external barriers (e.g., financial concerns, lack of a support network). To effectively help parents, audiologists and speech-language pathologists need to counsel each family according to their unique needs by assessing for and addressing internal and external barriers that are interfering with the intervention process. Effective partnerships can help parents engage in shared decision-making and work through challenges that arise. This session will describe communication skills that support your ability to obtain a comprehensive understanding of parent values, goals and barriers. Resources will be shared to promote partnerships with parents.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe common barriers parents experience that interfere with treatment adherence
• Describe person-centered communication attitudes and skills to engage parents
• List three parent-professional partnership resources to help optimize child outcomes

1.5 hours | 0.15 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest, Audiology Level: Intermediate

S9 - Speech Sound Disorder Treatment Implementation: Intensity and Effective Teaching Methods

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

Much of the research on treatment of speech sound disorders (SSD) focuses on how to select sounds for treatment so that maximum gains are made. However, learning in treatment is critical to the success of any intervention program, which raises practical questions: How much treatment is enough? What does good progress look like? How in the world am I going to teach this child to correctly articulate X (insert any terrifying late acquired sound, especially the dreaded /r/). This session will review the evidence on treatment intensity and treatment progress. In addition, various resources that provide guidance on teaching different complex sounds will be shared. The audience will be welcome to share their tips, too!

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe treatment intensity
• Evaluate the evidence related to treatment intensity for children with SSD
• Identify key resources for effectively teaching complex speech sounds

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

S10 - The Complexity Approach to Speech Sound Disorder Treatment: Sound Selection

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

Children with speech-sound disorders make up a large portion of the caseload for school-based SLPs who work with students ages three to seven. But SLPs rarely use the complexity approach in treating these children due to a lack of familiarity with the approach, despite the evidence to support its use. This presentation will review the evidence demonstrating the efficacy of the complexity approach and will walk clinicians through sound selection within this approach. Specific elements of sound selection that will be reviewed are: characteristics of the sounds (i.e., developmental norms and language universals); characteristics of the child’s speech (i.e., accuracy and stimulability). The presenter will use case studies to illustrate how to select complex treatment targets. This presentation will build on the presenter’s open access tutorial on this same topic: https://doi.org/10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0082. Attendees do not need to read the tutorial in advance of attending the presentation.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the child and sound characteristics that make targets complex
• Assess these child and sound characteristics in children on their caseload
• Utilize assessment information to select complex targets for individual children

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

S11 - Paired Treatment Approaches for Speech Sound Disorders: Minimal Pair, Maximal Opposition, Multiple Opposition

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

There are numerous evidence-based treatment approaches for preschool and school-age children with speech-sound disorders. This session will review three approaches to selecting and contrasting two or more sounds during speech-sound disorder treatment: minimal pair (misarticulated sound paired with its typical substitution), maximal opposition (two misarticulated sounds that differ greatly from one another) and multiple opposition (multiple misarticulated sounds that are all replaced within the same substitute). The evidence supporting each treatment approach will be reviewed. Sound selection will be illustrated using hypothetical clinical cases. Through these examples, clinicians will gain an understanding of what children each approach is appropriate for.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Develop a treatment plan based on a traditional minimal pair approach
• Develop a treatment plan based on a maximal opposition/empty set treatment approach
• Develop a treatment plan based on a multiple opposition treatment approach

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs
Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

S12 - Selecting Treatment Words to Boost Learning of Speech Sounds

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

What do words have to do with it? Traditionally, we have thought of treatment words as just an unimportant vehicle for teaching sounds to preschool and school-age children with speech sound disorders: an inactive ingredient of therapy. Emerging evidence suggests that treatment words matter and can facilitate sound learning. This session will review the characteristics of words that seem to boost speech sound learning: word frequency, neighborhood density and age-of-acquisition of the word. In addition, will consider the role of nonwords in treatment of speech sound disorders. Resources for selecting real words and nonwords will be shared. This presentation will build on the presenter’s open access tutorial on this same topic: https://doi.org/10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0080. Attendees do not need to read the tutorial in advance of attending the presentation.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe real-word characteristics that influence speech sound learning
• Select real words or nonwords to facilitate speech sound learning
• Implement a nonword approach to speech sound treatment

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

S13 - More Than a Test Score: Functional Assessment and Goal-Setting

Sarah Baar, MA, CCC-SLP, Honeycomb Speech Therapy

Person-centered care is newly emphasized as a best practice in general health care as well as speech-language pathology. However, this approach contrasts significantly with the previously emphasized medical model and impairment-based testing and goals. Assessment and goal setting are fundamental steps in shaping a therapist’s treatment for a highly-meaningful and person-centered approach. This course uses best practices, evidence and practical ideas to describe a person-centered assessment model and functional goal-writing frameworks for the adult neurogenic population, with practical examples from speech-language pathology across settings, from acute care to home health to outpatient therapy.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List four person-centered outcomes (PCO’s) that can be used to measure participation/activity.
• Utilize three evidence-based frameworks to write person-centered, measureable goals.
• Describe three components of a person-centered assessment that comply with best practice and set the stage for a person-centered approach in speech therapy.

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs
Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Introductory

S14 - Vestibular Disorders and Diagnostic Guidelines

Julie Honaker, PhD, CCC-A, Cleveland Clinic

Historically, interpretation of vestibular disorders in the audiology clinic has fit within a peripheral versus central vestibulopathy categories. However, advances in our understanding of the complexities of the vestibular system, along with new diagnostic guidelines allow audiologists to provide more detailed descriptions of complex case histories and clinical testing, which should lead to improved management and patient outcomes. This presentation will provide a case-by-case approach to understanding typical and atypical vestibular disorders.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify clinical signs and symptoms associated with typical and atypical vestibular disorders
• Recognize vestibular assesssment patterns in typical and atypical vestibular disorders
• Reference diagnostic criteria for typical and atypical vestibular disorders

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs

Track: Audiology Level: Intermediate

S15 - Vestibular Assessment Across the Lifespan

Julie Honaker, PhD, CCC-A, Cleveland Clinic

VEMP, VNG, VHIT and more! This intermediate presentation will provide a comprehensive overview of the vestibular test battery and clinical practice guidelines for what measures to include and when. The importance of considering findings of the entire test battery to determine normal versus abnormal and peripheral versus central etiology will be presented. Case examples will be provided on patients across the lifespan.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify best-practice protocols for assessing patients in the vestibular clinic
• Discuss current trends in vestibular testing, including VEMP, VHIT and Risk of Falling Assessment
• Name essential componets of the vestibular test report

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs

Track: Audiology Level: Intermediate

S16 - President's Celebration: From Education to Invitation

Sarah Buffie, MSW, LSW, Soul Bird Consulting

How might we begin to see ourselves as co-creators versus care takers? How might we offer a felt sense of feeling safe, seen and heard? Sometimes our role as professionals leaves little room for the personal. In this session we will be exploring a lens that invites personalism over professionalism as a way to reimagine our role in the lives of those we support.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the services of Soul Bird Consulting.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the magitutde of social isolation for those with devalued labels.
• Recall Belonging as a central resilience factor.
• Differentiate between services/supports and roles/resilience.

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Introductory

S17 - Taking Care: Resilience for Professionals

Sarah Buffie, MSW, LSW, Soul Bird Consulting

We know that growing resilience mitigates the effects of trauma. However, supporting someone else without building your OWN resilience can be challenging. In this session participants will grow in their understanding of nourishing their own resilience. Together we will engage in activities that integrate the mind and the body. The experiential nature of the afternoon will invite introspection as well as connection with others as a way to foster nourishment and well-being.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify ways to grow their own resilience.
• Engage in interactive exercises that integrate the mind and body.
• Identify ways to return to a state of balance and calm to reach states of regulation.

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Intermediate

S18 - Literacy and Justice for ALL: Culturally Responsive Practices for SLPs in Literacy

Shurita Thomas-Tate, PhD, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University

In our increasingly diverse schools, culturally responsive practices support the achievement of ALL students by providing services that acknowledge and appropriately respond to the intersection of cultural needs that we and our students bring to interactions. One area that the speech-language pathologist (SLP) can make a huge impact in is literacy. Literacy is foundational to learning in the schools. Unfortunately, disparities in literacy outcomes has been a source of great educational disparity that directly correlates with future success and quality of life. However, literacy also has the potential to be a great source of equity when delivered in ways that values students’ cultures and identities. SLPs can and should be involved the prevention, assessment and intervention of literacy-based skills. SLPs can be agents of change for their students by helping student develop as readers, which can potentially change the trajectory of their lives. This presentation aims to provide participants with practical information about the context and nature of culturally responsive practices in literacy development.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the product Ujima Language and Literacy.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define cultural-responsiveness and associated terms
• Examine their cultural identities and stages of cultural responsiveness and develop a plan for growth
• Discuss the relationships between literacy and educational equity
• Apply culturally responsive practices to prevention, assessment and intervention of literacy skills

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

S19 - The SLP and Dyslexia: Principles, Content and Methods for Lesson Planning

Eva Trumbower, MS, CCC-SLP, Consultant, Center for Family Policy and Research, University of Missouri

It is clear that the SLP plays a critical role in the assessment and treatment for children with speech-language disorders and, more recently, there is evidence that the SLP has a significant role in assessment and intervention for children with written language difficulties including dyslexia. Knowledge of language systems and structure provides the SLP the opportunity to contribute to the improvement of literacy. In this session, the characteristics of dyslexia, comorbidity with disorders of speech and language and supporting principles, content and methods for intervention planning will be emphasized. Guidance from ASHA, the International Dyslexia Association, the International Literacy Association, the Center for Effective Reading Instruction, state and national standards for English Language Arts will be referenced.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• State the defining characteristics of written language disorders including dyslexia.
• Describe principles, content and methods of instruction for students with oral and written language disorders.
• Develop lesson plans for students based on the principles, content and methods for effective and supportive intervention for students demonstrating oral and written language disorders.
• Define the knowledge-base of the SLP in language and literacy learning and determine what additional knowledge is needed in the written modality.

3 hours | 0.30 CEUs

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

Ethics Track

S23 - Ethical Dilemmas in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology: It’s Complicated!

Theresa Rodgers, MA, CCC-SLP, ASHA-F, EdS (LD), SLP Consulting Services

The topic of ethics is a pervasive and sometimes challenging one, applicable to all professionals, practice settings and types of clients. Many ethical situations are complex with multiple factors and considerations that must be weighed to reach the best possible outcome. Applicable components of the Missouri Board of Registration for the Healing Arts Rules and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Code of Ethics will be highlighted and a decision-making model will be delineated which can be applied as practice issues are encountered. Ethical issues and applicable principles specific to health care, private practice, university and school-based settings, in addition to ethical use of social media, supervision and several other areas of practice will be discussed. Scenarios depicting potential ethical violations and dilemmas will be analyzed and deliberated by participants.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Delineate components of an ethical decision-making model
• Analyze scenarios that constitute potential ethical violations and dilemmas
• Implement the ASHA Code of Ethics as well as state regulations in the practice of audiology and speech-language pathology

2 hours | 0.20 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest, Ethics Level: Intermediate

S24 - An Introduction to Ethical Decision-Making in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology

Theresa Rodgers, MA, CCC-SLP, ASHA-F, EdS (LD), SLP Consulting Services

Delineating what is ethical in the practice of audiology and speech-language pathology may not always be obvious or clear; rather, most situations are complex requiring not only recognition of the dilemma, but various factors which must be considered in deriving an appropriate solution. The Missouri Board of Registration for the Healing Arts Ethical Standards (contained within the Rules) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Code of Ethics (2016) will be highlighted, ethical frameworks will be described and a decision-making model will be delineated which can be applied as audiology and speech-language pathology practice issues are encountered.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Delineate common themes of ethical inquiries and adjudications
• Describe key considerations in resolution of ethical dilemmas
• Identify ethics resources applicable to audiology and speech-language pathology

1 hour | 0.10 CEUs

Track: Multi-Interest, Ethics Level: Introductory

Student Technical Sessions

ST1 - Student Perception of Hearing Aids and Healthy Hearing Practices

Emily Goerlich, Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, Truman State University

Hearing aids make great changes for the better in the lives of people who use them. However, stereotypes and negative beliefs about hearing aids decrease the likelihood that those who are in need of hearing aids will wear them. This research interviews college students majoring in either communication disorders or music, both pursuits where good hearing is essential and emphasized. It seeks to find out the students’ general view of hearing aids and hearing aid users, in addition to which stereotypes are most prevalent and damaging and what measures students are taking (or not) to prevent needing amplification in the future.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the overall attitude of college students toward hearing aids and their willingness to wear them.
• Identify which negative beliefs about hearing aids are most prevalent and damaging.
• Identify trends in healthy hearing practices of and use of hearing protection by college students.

Introductory | Audiology

ST2 - Effect of Onset Age of Musical Lessons on Hearing in Background Noise

Natalie Seidl, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Maureen Fischer, MS, CCC-A, St. Louis University

As a part of learning to play an instrument, musicians develop skills in differentiating between pitches, distinguishing individual melodies from layered musical parts and recognizing differences in timing of rhythms. Because of the changes in the brain that come from being trained in an instrument, research shows that musicians have an advantage in understanding speech with background noise.1 However, does the age at which an individual learns to play the instrument affect these benefits? With language development, we know that there is a critical period in which developing language is easier. Similar to this, scientists have predicted that there is a sensitive period for music training that lasts until children are seven years old.2 To study the effect that the age of onset of music training has on an individual’s hearing, the study will look to see whether subjects who started private lessons in music before the age of seven perform better in hearing speech in noise than those that learned an instrument after. Participants will be divided into groups based on their years of musical experience and their age of onset of training. Data will be collected through testing participants with speech in noise testing to determine if there is a difference in results between those that were trained in music during the sensitive period and those that were trained after. 1 Parbery-Clark, A., Skoe, E., & Kraus, N. (2009). Musical Experience Limits the Degradative Effects of Background Noise on the Neural Processing of Sound. Journal of Neuroscience, (45), 14100. 2 Steele, C. J. (1,2), Bailey, J. A. (1), Penhune, V. B. (1), & Zatorre, R. J. (3). (n.d.). Early musical training and white-matter plasticity in the corpus callosum: Evidence for a sensitive period. Journal of Neuroscience, 33(3), 1282–1290.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Discuss if the results of our study indicated that early music training results in improved scores on speech in noise testing.
• Identify two ways that music training affects the central auditory nervous system and related CNS structures.
• Describe the difference between a critical and sensitive period.

Intermediate | Audiology

ST3 - College-Aged Students’ Perceptions of Personal Characteristics Based on Voice

Emma Zimmer, Truman State University
Molly McGrady, Truman State University
Supervisor: Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

The purpose of this project was to determine how college students perceive the vocal quality known as glottal fry. The reason the researchers chose to look at this is because glottal fry usage is becoming a trend, especially among young women. Participants included students enrolled in a public speaking course in order to control the level of understanding of public speaking skills. The participants listened to three different voice recordings of varying levels of glottal fry (minimal, some, excessive) and were given a questionnaire regarding perceptions of speaker characteristics (confidence, competence, likability and likeliness to value input in a group project) following each recording. The questionnaire also included a demographic survey, including age, year in school, gender, race/ethnicity, Myers-Briggs personality type (American Psychological Association, 2010, p. 179), hometown and parents’ level of education. The end goal of this project was to learn how college-aged listeners perceive glottal fry and to find if there are any trends among these perceptions based on demographics of the students. Current literature within this area of study is mostly performed using adult listeners, which is why the researchers chose to look at the perceptions specifically among college-aged students. Data will be collected in January of 2020 and will be analyzed and presented at the Missouri Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in April of 2020.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the differences between how adult listeners and college aged listeners perceive speakers who use glottal fry.
• Describe how a listener’s demographics affect their perceptions of speakers who use glottal fry.
• Describe how perceptions of individuals are affected by their amount of glottal fry usage in speech.

Introductory | Multi-Interest

ST4 - Training Program Addressing Glottal Fry Severity and Vocal Self-Perception

Thea Cornwell, Truman State University
Supervisor: Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

The purpose of this research was to determine if a vocal training program would impact female college-aged students’ severity of glottal fry and their self-perception of voice. If so, how are these factors impacted? Participants were asked to read the Grandfather Passage which was audio recorded by the researcher. These recordings were later analyzed and rated by the researcher and the mentor on a severity scale of 0-5, where 0 is the absence of glottal fry and 5 is a severe amount of glottal fry. Participants then completed a survey regarding their self-perception of voice (e.g., self-rating of confidence, professionalism and kindness). Participants were then asked to attend six weekly group sessions where the researcher provided education regarding the glottal fry register and the literature relating to the perception of glottal fry. In addition, voice facilitating therapy approaches (e.g., chant speech, focus, and semi-occluded vocal tract exercises) were implemented. The participants were asked to complete the approaches at least twice a week for 10 minutes outside of weekly sessions. The participants then read the Grandfather Passage aloud and completed the self-perception survey again. The glottal fry severity of the participants and the self-perception surveys prior to and after the training sessions were analyzed to determine the impact the training program had on the participants. Data analysis was not available prior to the submission deadline but will be completed before the convention. Results will be verbally and graphically portrayed.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the current perception of glottal fry in the professional world.
• Identify how education regarding glottal fry along with vocal training impacts vocal self-perception.
• Identify how education regarding glottal fry along with vocal training impacts glottal fry severity.

Intermediate | SLP-Clinical Topic

Student Poster Presentations

SP1 - Are Finances a Limitation to Hearing Loss Treatment in the Middle Class Population?

Jenna Sorensen, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Maureen Fischer, MS, CCC-A, St. Louis University

Everyday, people of all ages get diagnosed with a variation of hearing loss. Whether the loss is mild or profound, there is some kind of treatment that can be done to mitigate the negative consequences of hearing loss. However, why are many of these individuals declining treatment? This study is to show the detrimental effects that high cost of hearing aids and no to minimum insurance coverage on a middle income class family and how it can create limitations to receiving treatment. Hearing loss may be accompanied by many negative feelings felt by the individual with the loss as well as his or her loved ones. Feelings of anger, guilt, frustration, isolation and even depression are side effects of not being able to hear environmental noise or participate in an effective communication. Many studies have shown that if someone with a severe hearing loss does not wear a hearing aid, there is an increased chance of getting dementia. Hearing aid can cost upwards of $7,000 and must be replaced every three to five years. Most insurance do not cover hearing aid because they are not deemed medically necessary; however, when a person loses their hearing they miss out of crucial elements of their life. Because of this lack of insurance coverage, middle-income families are not able to afford hearing aids and experience the negative outcomes of the lack of treatment.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Recall four negative consequences of not receiving needed hearing loss treatment.
• Describe two reasons to why the lack of insurance coverage on hearing aids most strongly affects the middle income SES families.
• Perform three advocacy efforts to increase coverage on hearing aids.

Intermediate | Audiology

SP2 - Cues-Pause-Point Procedure for Treating Echolalia in Autism

Alyssa Armijo, BS, Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University

Approximately three quarters of verbal children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate echolalia, a form of verbal imitation in which an individual will repeat the words or phrases of others (Violette & Swisher, 1992). While some believe that echolalia may be a functional aspect of language development which leads to generative communication, others view it as functionless and strive to decrease the behavior (Steigler, 2015). Literature regarding echolalia is limited, outdated and inconclusive regarding definitions and views and best approaches to treating echolalia (Steigler, 2015). One approach which has been successful in remediating echolalia and aiding in language training efforts for individuals with ASD is the cues-pause-point (CPP) procedure (Al-Dawaided, 2014; Foxx, Schreck, Garito, Smith & Weisenberger, 2004; Valentino, Shillingsburg, Conine & Powell, 2012). This study is designed to strengthen the evidence regarding the effectiveness of CPP for treating immediate echolalia in English-speaking, school-aged children with ASD.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define the term echolalia and describe the two types, immediate and delayed.
• Identify one procedure which may be used to treat echolalia in children with autism.
• Summarize the cues-pause-point procedure.

Intermediate | SLP-Educational Topic

SP3 - The Perceptions of Missouri Speech-Language Pathologists Regarding the Response-to-Intervention Program and Speech Sound Delays

Claire Wernig, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

The response-to-intervention (RtI) program is a multi-tiered system that is widely used amongst school speech-language pathologists (SLP). Duties of the SLP include RtI involvement in Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3 student support teams (ASHA, 2010). In this descriptive study, the perceptions of SLPs’ regarding the RtI program and speech sound delays will be identified. A focus group of school-based SLPs evaluated questions relevant for this research project. An anonymous survey was developed and will be sent to SLPs identified through public-school websites in Missouri. The survey link was sent to each identified SLP and a request for their participation was included in the email-message. A follow-up email was sent two weeks after the initial request. The survey consisted of twelve questions. Results from this research project will reveal how many SLPs are serving students through RtI programs, their perceptions, structure of RtI programs, collaboration techniques and breaks or dismissal criteria used for the RtI programs regarding speech sound delays.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the perceptions of school-based speech-language pathologists regarding the RtI program.
• Identify what structure Missouri SLPs are using to treat speech sound delays for students in the RtI programs.
• Recall what collaboration techniques are used and are most successful in the RtI programs regarding speech sound delays.

Intermediate | SLP-Educational Topic

SP4 - Culinary Professionals' Knowledge of How to Accommodate Customers With Swallowing Disorder

Lauren Williams, BS, Missouri State University
Supervisor: Klaas Bakker, PhD, Missouri State University

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) model, the ability to participate in social activities, such as eating out, is crucial to one’s quality of life. Some people with dysphagia may feel deterred from eating at restaurants due to lack of safe options for them to consume. This study will involve surveys given to culinary professionals regarding customers with swallowing disorders in restaurants in the southwest Missouri (Springfield) area. This will give insight into the amount of knowledge culinary professionals have about how they could improve the restaurant experience for those with swallowing disorders and analyze questions that these professionals may have about these types of customers as well. This study is essential for the field of speech-language pathology because it may indicate the importance and need for the education of culinary professionals about certain accommodations needed for customers with dysphagia. Providing education on this topic to hospitality workers could improve the quality of life of those who have swallowing disorders.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe themes found in answers from culinary professionals regarding how they modify food to accommodate dysphagia patients.
• Understand how the fields of speech-language pathology and hospitality could collaborate to improve the lives of people with swallowing disorders.
• Identify three common questions culinary professionals have about customers with swallowing disorders.

Introductory | SLP-Educational Topic

SP5 - Client Versus Clinician’s Perception of Student Clinician’s Clinical Confidence

Lauren Lewis, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Ashton Eastin, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

During the first year as a graduate student in a speech-language pathology program, students are required to complete a clinical practicum. This clinical experience often leaves many students feeling incompetent as they are not confident in their knowledge and application of skills learned in undergraduate classes. While previous studies have compared the perception of clinical confidence of graduate students and their supervisors, there is a lack of evidence regarding clinical confidence of student-clinicians compared to the perceptions of clients (Larson, 2007). Finch, Fleming, Brown, Lethlean, Cameron and McPhail (2013) found that even though students had coursework addressing various methods of treatment, their anxiety was not reduced when beginning treatment during the first year of graduate school, leaving students with a feeling of incompetence. The current study utilized a survey to investigate the perceptions of confidence level of 18 first year graduate students and 26 clients. The student-clinician survey included ten questions developed to assess perception of clinical confidence. The client survey included eight questions developed to assess perception of the student-clinician’s clinical confidence by clients and caregivers. Results will be presented and a discussion of the results will be provided.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Explain reasons as to why first-year speech-language pathology graduate students lack clinical confidence.
• Describe current research regarding clinical confidence of speech-language pathology graduate students.
• Analyze their own performance in a clinical setting based on their schooling, experience and knowledge of research.

Intermediate | SLP-Clinical Topic

SP6 - Effect of Acute Stress on Listening Comprehension in College Students

Rania Daoud, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Maureen Fischer, MS, CCC-A, St. Louis University

College students experience a great amount of stress, especially during exam time. Students are expected to attend class and continue to learn while studying for and taking exams. We are going to explore the effect of acute stress from exams on listening comprehension in college students. We are hoping to explore the implications of possible decrease in listening comprehension on the effectiveness of attending class during midterm and final exams. The question we are aiming to answer is how does acute stress affect listening comprehension in college students? In order to answer this question, college students will fill out questionnaires to determine stress levels before and during exam time. Students will participate in auditory processing assessment to test listening comprehension. The staggered spondaic word assessment will be used to determine listening comprehension ability during period of acute stress.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Differentiate between attention and listening comprehension.
• Identify factors of stress for college students.
• Identify an assessment of listening comprehension.

Intermediate | Audiology

SP7 - Knowledge and Perceptions Among Beginning College Students Regarding Speech-Language Pathology

Brooke Picou, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

There is a need for more speech-language pathologists throughout Missouri in a variety of settings. Although more professionals are needed, the Southeast Missouri State University Department of Communication Disorder’s undergraduate enrollment numbers are not increasing. The aim of this survey was to determine the knowledge and perceptions of first-year college students regarding speech-language pathology and the Department of Communication Disorders at Southeast Missouri State University. Beginning college student’s knowledge and perceptions about the field will help to better recruit undergraduate and graduate students to the department. The long-term goal is to create awareness for potential students and create interest to declare a major and become a speech-language pathologist.
This study surveyed more than 130 first-year students at Southeast Missouri Students in fall 2019. It included questions about what they knew and how they perceived speech-language pathology. Demographic information was also collected to determine how it influenced their knowledge and perceptions of the field. Results and conclusions are ongoing and will be available at the time of the presentation.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe first-year student’s knowledge and perceptions of speech-language pathology and the Department of Communication Disorders at Southeast Missouri State University.
• Summarize variables that contribute to first-year student’s knowledge and perceptions of speech-language pathology and the Department of Communication Disorders at Southeast Missouri State University.
• Apply the findings regarding first-year students knowledge and perceptions of the field and department for future recruitment efforts.

Intermediate | SLP-Educational Topic

SP8 - Effects of Animal Assisted Therapy in the Speech-Language Clinic

Kaitlin Seabourne, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Susan Fulton, AuD, Southeast Missouri State University

Animal assisted therapy (AAT) is a technique which incorporates animals into therapy sessions to promote and improve specific goals. AAT has shown benefit in a variety of settings (e.g. emotional and behavioral, intellectual, neurogenic disorders and language disorders), however limited data is available regarding effects on goal achievement, motivation and clinicians’ perceptions of AAT in the speech-language clinic. This study focused on the use of AAT in pediatric articulation therapy sessions. Five participants, three to nine years of age, participated. Participants were divided into two groups. Out of a 10-week trial, each group received five weeks of AAT once a week and five weeks of no AAT. Two therapy dogs, certified through Pet Partner’s and Therapy Dogs International, participated in this study. Percent increase in therapy goals, with and without the dogs present, were measured, as well as administration of a small questionnaire regarding the clinicians’ and participants’ perceptions of AAT. Results are currently being analyzed and will be presented at the time of presentation.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the effects of Animal Assisted therapy on speech therapy goals.
• Describe the perceptions of supervisors and animal handlers after using Animal-Assisted therapy.
• Identify limitations associated with Animal Assisted therapy.

Intermediate | SLP-Clinical Topic

SP9 - Life Participation Approach to Aphasia and Communication Disorders Students and Incorporating Technology

Amanda Webb, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of the life participation approach to Aphasia (LPAA) on individuals who have a diagnosis of aphasia, along with investigating what knowledge students have of communicating with this population. This study modified a recent study that was done by Erin Allen, MA, CCC-SLP, in 2018. The original study piloted the LPAA program at Southeast Missouri State University; however, the current study was modified for the communication, trainings and tests with the student volunteers by incorporating and utilizing technology. The Life Participation Approach to Aphasia program supports individuals and their caregivers by providing them with the opportunity for community reintegration. To engage with the adult, three student volunteers were assigned to meet within the Cape Girardeau community, provided that they would be the ones to interact with the adult with aphasia for a minimum of 30 minutes, two times a month, over the course of four months. The researcher gathered data to investigate the quality of life outcomes of the adults participating in the program based on the results of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 which was administered at the beginning and end of the study. Student perspectives were investigated regarding their knowledge of aphasia, along with how to communicate with an individual who has aphasia. These perspectives were analyzed using pre- and post-tests. Student volunteers also completed subjective weekly logs of strategies used to communicate, location and duration of activity.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the life participation approach to aphasia.
• Summarize the approach, methods and outcomes of the study.
• Apply their knowledge of the life participation approach to aphasia and how it affects those involved in the approach.

Intermediate | SLP-Educational Topic

SP10 - Effects of MIT and Tactile-Kinesthetic Cues on Broca's Aphasia and AoS

Angela Mann, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Misty Tilmon, MA, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

Melodic intonation therapy (MIT) is an intervention program used to remediate and improve the expressive communication abilities of individuals who have experienced trauma to the left-hemisphere of the brain. Several studies have indicated a necessity for more information regarding specific benefits of MIT. For this study, the traditional approach to MIT was adapted to the meet the needs of the participant. Specific techniques, such as left-handed tapping, intoning and humming were utilized during intervention. Tactile-kinesthetic cues are primarily used to remediate articulatory errors in children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and limited information exists regarding its efficacy on adults with apraxia of speech (AoS) and related disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of MIT techniques and tactile-kinesthetic cues on a 55-year old male, 10-years post-stroke with chronic acquired apraxia of speech and Broca’s aphasia. Pre- and post-test data were collected to determine the impact of intervention on expressive communication ability. Several factors which impact an individual’s ability to expressively communicate were analyzed including: (a) the participant’s perceived quality of life related to communication ability, (b) articulatory precision in structured, multi-syllabic speech tasks and (c) intelligibility of conversational speech as perceived by an unfamiliar listener. Results are currently being analyzed and will be completed by the time of presentation. Data collected in this study will add to literature regarding the efficacy of MIT techniques and tactile-kinesthetic cues on expressive language and perceived quality of life of an individual with AoS and Broca’s aphasia.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Summarize the effects of melodic intonation therapy techniques and tactile-kinesthetic cues on the communicative quality of life of an individual with co-occurring Broca’s aphasia and acquire.
• Describe the effects of melodic intonation therapy techniques and tactile-kinesthetic cues on the intelligibility of an individual with co-occurring Broca’s aphasia and acquired apraxia of Sp.
• Identify the effects of melodic intonation therapy techniques and tactile-kinesthetic cues on the articulatory precision of an individual with co-occurring Broca’s aphasia and acquired apraxi.

Intermediate | SLP-Clinical Topic

SP11 - New Generation of AAC: Are SLPs Prepared?

Erin Losin, BS, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Saneta Thurmon, MA, CCC-SLP/A, St. Louis University

As the number of people who require augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is growing and as technology is evolving, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) must be up to date on current practices surrounding AAC. Communicating with one’s family, friends and peers is a basic need for every human person. However, not everyone is able to verbally communicate with others. People with complex communication needs are typically unable to communicate with others via oral communication and therefore rely on AAC to communicate with those around them. Since almost four million people within the United States have complex communication needs, it is crucial that all SLPs have taken an AAC course and obtained clinical competencies within this discipline to be knowledgeable on how to provide intervention to clients who use AAC. If SLPs are unfamiliar with how to treat clients who utilize AAC, their clients will not be receiving services they are entitled to. SLPs can help give a voice to those who are voiceless and restore someone’s confidence to communicate with others, so it should be required that all SLPs are trained on how to treat clients who utilize AAC. The results from a survey will be discussed to identify the extent of knowledge SLPs have on AAC.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the growing need for all speech-language pathologists to be trained on how to provide intervention to clients who utilize Augmentative and Alternative Communication.
• Evaluate if current speech-language pathologists are adequately prepared to provide intervention for clients who use AAC.
• Identify various resources that speech-language pathologists can utilize to prepare them to work with their clients who use AAC.

Intermediate | SLP-Educational Topic

SP12 - Quality of Life Changes Following Constraint-Induced Auditory Therapy (CIAT)

Alison Theobald, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Susan Fulton, AuD, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Misty Tilmon, MA, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

The purpose of this research project was to determine if auditory comprehension deficits associated with Wernicke’s aphasia are improved after receiving constraint-induced auditory therapy (CIAT). This research project also aims to determine if CIAT is an efficacious treatment program for improving auditory comprehension in Wernicke’s aphasia. CIAT is an auditory training program using dichotic digits to strengthen auditory processing skills in an individual’s deficit ear. Dichotic digits are presented in each ear simultaneously, so the individual hears a different number in each ear. The individual is then instructed to identify the number presented in the deficit ear. This study involved one male in his seventies with Wernicke’s aphasia and persistently severe auditory deficits. Over the period of the study, March 2019 to December 2019, the participant received CIAT intervention biweekly. Withdrawal periods were dependent on the schedule of the clinic where services were offered. The outcome measures of this study were obtained via the following pre- and post-test measures: the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39), the Quality of Communication Life Scale (ASHA QCL), the Communication Confidence Rating Scale for Aphasia (CCRSA), the Left Hemisphere Inventory of the Burns Brief Inventory of Communication and Cognition (Burns Inventory), the Competing Environmental Sound (CES) Test and Dichotic Digits. The data collected as a result of post-testing measures were compared to the pre-intervention measures administered after the withdrawal periods. Data is currently being analyzed and will be available during the Convention.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify whether constraint-induced auditory therapy has an effect on the quality of life of a person with aphasia.
• Identify whether constraint-induced auditory therapy will improve auditory comprehension as measured by the Burns Brief Inventory of Communication and Cognition (Burns Inventory).
• Identify whether constraint-induced auditory therapy improved the client’s scores on competing environmental sounds (CES) and dichotic digits.

Intermediate | SLP-Clinical Topic

SP13 - Perception of Vocal Health by Elementary and Middle School Teachers

Gabrielle Aultman, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Jacqueline Aultman, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

Previous studies focusing on the high prevalence of voice disorders in teachers have suggested that vocal loading and lack of knowledge of vocal health might lead to vocal disorders. Voice disorders can occur over the course of a teacher’s career and can impact their quality of life and overall ability to communicate both in and out of the classroom. There is limited research on how elementary and middle school teachers perceive their vocal problems and overall vocal health. The purpose of this qualitative survey study was to investigate how elementary and middle school teachers perceive their voice problems, vocal health status and the impact of their voice problems on their teaching career. The participants included 10 elementary and 10 middle school teachers. Procedures included a brief survey on voice problems and vocal health created by the researchers followed by a video conference call during which the researchers provided education on vocal health. Preliminary results indicated that the teachers were aware of their vocal problems and overall vocal health impacted by their profession; however, they were unsure of implementing vocal strategies to ensure the maintenance of optimum professional voice. Future studies are needed to facilitate vocal health-based education and screening in teachers who experience high vocal loading during work.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe voice problems in elementary and middle school teachers.
• Describe vocal health-based problems in elementary and middle school teachers.
• Identify vocal health strategies to maintain optimum voice for professional voice users.

Intermediate | SLP-Educational Topic

SP14 - Perceptions of Communication Disorders, Dietetics and Nursing Students Toward IPE

Eilish Overby, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Jeffrey Damerall, JD, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Misty Tilmon, MA, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

Although interprofessional education (IPE) is considered a crucial element in the preparation of health professionals, a model of best practices has not been established. This study was designed to add to the literature base and assist graduate programs in evaluating the perceptions of students regarding a collaborative learning experience among undergraduate nursing and dietetic students and graduate speech-language pathology students. Students from the three disciplines participated in an experiential learning event in which foods and liquids were prepared according to the standards of the International Dysphagia Diet Standardization Initiative (IDDSI). From the recruited participants (n=49), 33 completed a pre-survey and 29 completed post-survey and 14 participants completed a pre- and post-interview. The survey and interview evaluated student perceptions and knowledge of allied professionals’ roles in the management of swallowing disorders. Quantitative and qualitative responses were analyzed to compare students’ knowledge and perceptions before and after the collaborative lab. This study provides some evidence that students who participate in an IPE gain a better understanding of their own roles and the roles of future health care team members.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the roles of a speech-language pathologist, nurse, and dietitian in the management of swallowing disorders.
• Describe the importance of interprofessional education in managing the care of patients with swallowing disorders.
• Evaluate the success of the interprofessional lab on swallowing management described in the study.

Intermediate | SLP-Educational Topic

SP15 - Hearing Assistive Technology in the Classroom

Kendall Werhane, BS, Student, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Maureen Fischer, MS, CCC-A, St. Louis University

Hearing assistive listening devices (HAT) are more common in special education classrooms and special school districts, but their use can expand beyond these classrooms. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has implemented guidelines and standards for background noise in unoccupied classrooms, but previous studies have found that no matter the child’s hearing abilities acoustics in many current classrooms are not conducive for an optimal learning environment. In my research, I hope to understand how we can inform teachers and institutions that HAT can be helpful for all students not just those who are hard of hearing or those who have a hearing impairment. Teachers and administrators will be asked a series of questions regarding their experiences in classrooms and with assistive technology. These survey questions will answer questions regarding two different aims. Aim one is to conclude if teachers and/or administrators are aware of the benefits of using HAT in the classroom. Aim two focuses on how many schools are using HAT and to discover the major barriers to implementing HAT into the classroom. Once data is collected and percentages from responses are reported, I hypothesize that from aim one it is to be expected that many teachers and administrators will not know many benefits to HAT. From aim two, I hypothesis that it is to be expected that there will be less than 10percent of schools who are using HAT and that the common barrier will be the financial burden or a lack of education about the deceives.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the benefits of hearing assistive technology in the classroom.
• Know the number of schools using hearing assistive technology.
• Know the common barriers with hearing assistive technology being used in the classroom.

Intermediate | Audiology

SP16 - Perceptual and Acoustic Analysis of Voice in Daycare Teachers

Karley Smith, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

There is a high prevalence of voice disorders in teachers; however, there are limited studies regarding perceptual and acoustic characteristics of voice disorders in daycare teachers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptual, acoustic and self-perceptual characteristics of voice in daycare teachers. In this study, ten participants (N=10), ages 22 to 52 who work in daycare centers, were recruited to participate in the study. The Consensus auditory-perceptual evaluation of voice (CAPE-V) and an interview were completed to garner subjective data. The PRAAT program was used to collect acoustic data pertaining to jitter, shimmer, harmonic-noise ratio, frequency and amplitude from various voice samples. The participants completed the Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10) to provide data on psychosocial consequences of voice disorders. The results indicated a relationship between the perceptual, acoustic and self-perceptual characteristics of the voice of daycare teachers. The results of this study are likely to benefit daycare teachers by increasing their knowledge and self-perception of vocal discomfort or voice problems.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe acoustic voice characteristics in daycare teachers.
• Describe perceptual voice characteristics in daycare teachers.
• Identify the level of awareness and psychosocial consequences of voice problems in daycare teachers.

Intermediate | SLP-Clinical Topic

SP17 - Transgender Communication Therapy: Knowledge and Perceptions of Speech-Language Pathology Students

Kathryn Dinsmore, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

Introduction: With an increase of awareness of transgender individuals and their needs involving communication therapy, speech-language pathologists are now required to have cultural competence with this population. There is a paucity of literature that analyzes the readiness of future speech-language pathologists regarding transgender communication therapy. Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to determine if communication disorders graduate programs in Missouri are preparing future clinicians to be competent in the treatment of transgender individuals and to identify any biases or misconceptions that communication disorder graduate students in Missouri have regarding transgender communication therapy. Method: An online survey was distributed to graduate students currently enrolled in communication disorders programs in Missouri containing questions about the LGBTQ+ community and transgender communication therapy. Results: Results will be included following data collection.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify patterns of preparation of students from graduate programs in Missouri in the area of transgender communication therapy
• Identify three misconceptions about the LGBTQ+ community that are prevalent among the participants in the study
• Describe the relationship between exposure to transgender communication therapy and perceived knowledge of transgender communication therapy

Introductory | SLP-Educational Topic

SP18 - The Impact of iCST on Cognition and Quality of Life

Lydia Cameron, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

Cognitive stimulation therapy is a group treatment for people with mild to moderate dementia that has been shown to improve both their cognition and quality of life (Spector et al., 2003). Its individual counterpart, individual cognitive stimulation therapy (iCST), does not have the same evidence base. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of iCST on cognition, quality of life and social functioning in older adults with mild to moderate dementia. A convenience sample of two participants with a diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia was recruited from assisted living facilities in Southeast Missouri. Participants participated in iCST sessions twice a week for eight weeks. Baseline measures and post-treatment measures were obtained using the Saint Louis mental status exam (SLUMS), the social functioning in dementia scale (SF-Dem) and the quality of life-Alzheimer’s disease scales (QoL-AD). Data analysis showed that cognition improved but quality of life and social functioning did not.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe cognition, quality of life and social functioning in people with dementia.
• Identify the different treatment components of iCST.
• Discuss the potential mechanisms of change underlying cognitive improvement due to iCST.

Intermediate | SLP-Clinical Topic

SP19 - Phonological Awareness Intervention of Low Socioeconomic Preschoolers

Emily Fischer, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Lillian Bull, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

Studies have shown that phonological awareness skills of preschoolers from lower socioeconomic status (SES) families were significantly lower than those of children from average/upper-SES. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of phonological awareness training on the pre-literacy skills of four- and five-year-old preschoolers from low-SES backgrounds. The research questions addressed in this study included the following: 1) Is there a significant difference in pre-literacy skills of low-SES preschoolers who participate in phonological awareness intervention when compared to low-SES preschoolers who received no phonological awareness intervention; 2) Is there significant improvement in the syllable segmentation, sound segmentation, sound manipulation, rhyming and/or syllable/sound blending skills of low-SES preschoolers who have participated in a phonological awareness intervention program? Participants attend a Head Start program in Missouri. The control and experimental groups each consisted of seven participants. In this experimental single subject design, participants were assessed prior to and following intervention using the Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processes-2nd Edition (CTOPP-2) and the Test of Preschool Early Literacy (TOPEL). The experimental group received six weeks of phonological awareness intervention. The intervention program included six classic children’s literature stories, one story per week. Intervention activities included syllable deletion, sound matching and blending sounds in words. The control group participated solely in arts and crafts activities related to the children’s story. Results included comparisons of pre- and post-test results of the experimental and control groups. The results confirmed the importance of phonological awareness skill training for developing adequate reading abilities.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the deficits in phonological awareness in children with low socioeconomic status.
• Identify specific phonologic awareness interventional tasks for four- and five-year-old preschoolers.
• Compare the outcomes of the phonological awareness intervention between the control group and experimental group.

Introductory | SLP-Clinical Topic

SP20 - Pulse Rate Recovery after Physical, Swallowing and Speech Tasks in Healthy College Students

Naomi Raible, Truman State University
Samantha Smith, Truman State University
Supervisor: Julia Edgar, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

Pulse oximetry is often used in the clinical setting to monitor oxygen saturation in patients with dysphagia. Anecdotally, speech-language pathologists have successfully used changes in oxygen saturation and pulse rate, measured with finger pulse oximetry, to gauge the work of eating. However, there is little normative data available on heart rate changes during a meal, or more importantly, changes in response to compensatory strategies for enhancing swallowing safety. Such information would be helpful when working with patients with dysphagia, especially if they experience cardio-pulmonary issues, such as COPD, in tandem. The purpose of this study was to use finger pulse oximetry to determine changes in pulse rate associated with various swallowing tasks in healthy, young adults as a foundation data pool. Swallowing tasks included hard swallow, double swallow, the 100 ml water swallow test and consecutive solid food swallows. Speech and physical fitness tasks were also conducted with pulse rates measured as supplemental information regarding the overall health of the individual and as data to be compared to in future studies of older populations, those with COPD and ultimately those with dysphagia.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe how to correctly and efficiently hard swallow.
• Interpret pulse oximetry data in tandem with physical, speech and swallowing tasks.
• Determine high, moderate or low level of fitness based on responses to the long version of the international physical activity questionnaire.

Intermediate | SLP-Clinical Topic

SP21 - The Comps Process

Taylor Reinsch, Truman State University
Abby Moore, ABD, Truman State University
Supervisor: Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

The purpose of this research project is to compare the masters level comps processes utilized between different speech-language pathology programs. A survey was sent out to the programs in Missouri, its bordering states, as well as Colorado and Indiana. The participants of this survey included each of the speech-language pathology graduate program directors from these universities. ASHA completed a study about 23 years ago that compared different comps processes throughout the country (Cunningham, Purvis, Baker, & Windmill, 1996). At that time, 73 percent of speech-language pathology graduate programs used written only or written and oral methods of comps for evaluating their students. The desired result was to find if any other graduate schools do not use comps and use another method, like Truman State University. Questions in the survey revolved around the methods used for comps, time investment, reasoning behind graduate requirements and the timeline of any changes to the comps process that have been seen throughout the history of the graduate level programs. First, the survey was created and was sent out to the program directors in January 2020. Once the data was collected through the survey sent out, the results were analyzed to see how the comps process has evolved throughout the past 25 years or so. The results will be reported at the MSHA Convention as well as Truman State University’s Student Research Conference.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Explain and understand how the comps process has evolved in the past 25 years.
• Describe different forms of comps in Midwestern universities.
• Describe the program directors’ perceptions of the comps process.

Introductory | SLP-Clinical Topic

Continuing Education

This course is offered for up to 4.10 ASHA CEUs (Various levels; Professional area).
The ethics sessions (23 and 24) are offered for up to 0.3 ASHA CEUs (Various levels; Professional area).

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MSHA is approved by the American Academy of Audiology to offer Academy CEUs for this activity. The program is worth a maximum of 1.6 CEUs. Academy approval of this continuing education activity is based on course content only and does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products, or clinical procedure, or adherence of the event to the Academy’s Code of Ethics. Any views that are presented are those of the presenter/CE Provider and not necessarily of the American Academy of Audiology.

Presenter Disclosures