Recorded Sessions

R1 - Dysphagia and Complex Decision Making for Medically Vulnerable Populations (4 Hours)

Paula Leslie, PhD, CCC-SLP, FRCSLT, MA, Bioethics, University of Central Lancashire

We will discuss the ethics of decision making and complex situations surrounding feeding that SLPs face when working with patients and caregivers. We will review the factors that cause burden to families and caregivers. We will discuss what is represented by the action we call “feeding” and how/why our best clinical intentions may be misaligned or possibly harmful to patients and families. We will formulate responses to case studies based on ethical concepts and clinical knowledge.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the differences between values, morals and ethics
  • Identify issues that cause burden to caregivers
  • Integrate frameworks that support robust and ethically sound decision-making

Time-Ordered Agenda:
Part One:

  • 20 minutes – Introduction: ethics and decisions
  • 20 minutes – Values, morals and ethics
  • 20 minutes – Medical ethical principles
  • 30 minutes – Evidence based practice
  • 20 minutes – Feeding tube considerations
  • 10 minutes – Conclusion

Part Two:

  • 10 minutes – Introduction: values and burdens
  • 20 minutes – What does it mean to feed?
  • 20 minutes – Caregiver burden
  • 15 minutes – The Seedhouse Grid
  • 20 minutes – Health care provider perceptions of eating and drinking
  • 15 minutes – Getting to the crux
  • 10 minutes – Conclusion

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Dysphagia

R2 - Empowering SLPs: Amplification and AR, New Tools and Updates (1 Hour)

Saneta Thurmon, CCC-A/SLP, Saint Louis University

The continuing innovation of hearing technology is demanding that SLPs are familiar with a wide variety of new and innovative options for their clients. I will discuss Resources for writing AR goals, Basic CI and hearing aid information and troubleshooting, as well as new recommendations and regulations related to OTC hearing aids and hybrid cochlear implants. Counseling on device use and troubleshooting, making appropriate referrals, and implementing AR strategies during treatment sessions will also be addressed. Armed with the information from this session, SLPs can assure their clients have access to updates in hearing technology and new auditory skills training programs.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify reliable resources for information on basic methods of hearing aid and CI troubleshooting
  • Formulate appropriate auditory training goals for children and adults when writing for IEPs and insurance reimbursement for adults from case studies presented in the course.
  • Discuss new regulations and applications of amplification devices such as Over-the-Counter Hearing aids and Hybrid Implants.

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Aural Rehab

R3 - Building the 'Village': Creating Inclusive Cultures With Autism and Differently-Abled (1 Hour)

Shannon Locke, CCC-SLP, Autism Outfitters LLC

Studies have shown that when employees see their company as committed to diversity with an inclusive culture they report more innovation, more team collaboration, and increased responsiveness to customer needs. 20% of all Americans are affected by disabilities, one in six children in the US have a developmental disability, and the prevalence of autism continues to climb at an alarming rate, now reported as high as 1 in 40. Organizations have and will continue to benefit from hiring individuals with autism spectrum disorder improving their workforce diversity and ultimately their bottom line. Autistic ways of thinking visually, with hyper-focused attention, and sense of routine are beneficial for any organization. This session will illustrate how, cover 5 most common misconceptions of interacting with individuals with disabilities, demystify autism, and offer a trail guide to successfully hiring and integrating individuals with ASD. The bottom line is that what is good for individuals with disabilities is good for everyone, this session will explain how!

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify how diversity makes a positive difference, specifically diversity built from differing abilities and ways of thinking.
  • Identify the 5 most common misconceptions of interacting with individuals with autism and other disabilities.
  • Recall what defines Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and devise ways to successfully integrate and retain employees and customers with autism and differing abilities through fostering an inclusive culture.
  • Identify the top 5 strategies for interviewing and hiring employees with ASD as well as the top 3 practical tips for serving individuals with ASD.

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: General Professional Affairs

R4- Implementing Best Practice for Childhood Apraxia of Speech (3 Hours)

Ruth Stoeckel, PhD, CCC-SLP, retired from Mayo Clinic

The current research is not conclusive on how best to assess or treat CAS, but there is sufficient evidence to guide clinical decision-making for most cases. This session will discuss specific strengths and weaknesses of different assessment protocols and treatment approaches/techniques to assist clinicians in making choices for children of a variety of ages and abilities. Specific techniques will be discussed and demonstrated. Videos examples and interactive activities will be used.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe assessment techniques most useful for different ages/abilities
  • Describe similarities and differences among current treatment approaches
  • Discuss modifications of therapy over time to address changing needs

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Speech/Language Pathology

R5 - Building the Village: Erasing Our Own Unconscious Bias (1 Hour)

Shannon Locke, CCC-SLP, Autism Outfitters LLC

The focus of this proposal is to increase an understanding of our own personal biases. Using the autism community as a culturally relevant minority group that may not be as emotionally charged as others today, we can self-reflect on our own unconscious bias in concrete examples while exploring ways to undo limitations caused by bias. We will discuss practical ways to advocate and support the autism community so that more people can embrace individuals with differences and even seek out more inclusive opportunities to expand diversity in our businesses, social groups, educational settings, and family gatherings. This conversation will provide a framework for additional conversations and ways to advocate for and support additional minority or oppressed groups such as Women, LGBTQ, Black, Hispanic, Indian, Native American, Asian, etc. individuals. Real evidence-based strategies to undo personal bias, that can be implemented anywhere will be presented to facilitate increased engagement and individual independence across settings, making a more diverse culture possible.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discover how diversity makes a positive difference, specifically diversity built from differing abilities and ways of thinking.
  • Learn a working definition of unconscious bias and the negative effects it has on an individual, a workplace, and the community.
  • An activity in self-reflection will be completed to provide participants with a personalized roadmap for action steps to support individuals with autism (or other minority groups) through their sphere of influence.
  • Explore our belief systems through the lens of individuals with disabilities as a minority group to eliminate harmful biases disguised as common practice or common knowledge that transfer across all minority groups.

 

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Multicultural Issues

R6 - Supporting the Success of Children Who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing (1 Hour)

Abby Zoia, LSLS Cert AVT MS, CED, Central Institute for the Deaf; Jessica Klein, MS, CCC-SLP, Central Institute for the Deaf

Today, many families choose a listening and spoken language (LSL) approach for their child who is deaf or hard of hearing. The goal of this approach is for children who are deaf and hard of hearing to develop listening and spoken language skills that match their hearing peers. When children have success with this approach, they enter school able to access auditory learning. They also enter school with a unique set of needs that their educational team needs to recognize. This session will focus on the information that educators need to know in order to help these students maintain success in the classroom.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the importance of understanding a student’s hearing loss and the technology available to and necessary for students learning listening and spoken language.
  • Describe the potential academic and social implications of hearing loss on students.
  • Identify classroom challenges and the supports and accommodations that can be put in place to alleviate these challenges.

 

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Management of Hearing Loss and Educational Issues

R7 - CAPD Mini-Seminar & Breakout Session (1 Hour)

Lisa Guillory, AuD, H.S. Truman Memorial Veterans’ Hospital

This breakout session will assist clinicians in starting to test, interpret, collaborate with other professionals, and treat. Case studies will be examined with regard to test result patterns in three auditory process areas (dichotic listening, temporal processing, and understanding stimuli of monaural low redundancy). There will be discussion of interpretations which guide the SLP to further testing and initiation of treatment. Case studies will include examples of treatments and outcomes.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • identify common interpretations of CAPD test results.
  • identify the associations between academic difficulties and CAPD test results
  • recall appropriate interventions for children and adults based on test results and reported functional problems.

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Other

R8 - Developmental and Acquired Auditory Processing Disorder - Clinician's Perspective (2 Hours)

Lisa Guillory, AuD, H.S. Truman Memorial Veterans’ Hospital

What is the state of clinical practice in CAPD in children and adults? What does current literature say regarding testing and treatment? Why is collaboration between audiologists and SLP’s important? What are the co-morbidities of children and adults who may have CAPD, and how do they affect diagnoses. What are the 3 primary auditory processes typically examined? What are the targets and goals of treatment? This presentation and several case studies will help the listener have a foundation in common etiologies, as well as evidence based testing and treatment.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • recall current clinical practices regarding appropriate assessment.
  • differentiate between development and acquired CAPD.
  • recall co-morbidities associated with CAPD in children and adults.
  • identify appropriate literature based treatments/therapies for CAPD.

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Other

R9 - Effective Writing Strategies for Secondary Students With Language Impairment (3 Hours)

Mitzi Brammer, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

For students in middle school and high school, showing what one knows is most often accomplished through writing. For a student with a language impairment, completing even simple writing tasks can be challenging, leading to feelings of self-doubt and frustration. Speech-language pathologists who work with students in secondary schools need evidence-based strategies they can share with students to allow them to write for a variety of purposes and a variety of audiences. This interactive session will address steps of the writing process, various purposes of writing, how to write in response to literature, and proofing techniques and strategies.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and use steps of the writing process so that secondary-level students can compose well-organized text
  • Identify various purposes for writing and audiences (genre) and implement appropriate therapeutic strategies for these
  • Use effective strategies for teaching students to write a response to literature showing an understanding of theme and characters (details from text should be used for support)
  • Identify and utilize proofing or revision/editing tools/checklists with students to help them self-assess their writing as well as peer-editing

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Literacy

R10 - Stop the Insanity! Developing Resilience for Overworked, Stressed-out CSD Professionals (2 Hours)

Mitzi Brammer, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

The constructs of student resilience and growth mindset have been studied in educational contexts for over twenty years. Only recently has this phenomenon been studied in the workplace. The COVID-19 global pandemic has added to existing stressors and lack of resilience among CSD professionals. Feeling exhausted, stressed, out of energy, and feeling unable to make it to the end are all too common among speech-language pathologists and audiologists who try to balance more and more items being put on their already full professional and domestic plates. This set of circumstances in which one finds oneself is more commonly known as burnout. Regardless of the professional setting (clinical or educational), resilience and having a growth mindset in a high-stress profession like communication science and disorders can be difficult to establish and maintain. Simultaneously, life can become more demanding as SLPs and AuDs make outreach connections in the communities, their parents age, and, for those with children, this can be a significant, albeit negative, tipping point. This engaging presentation will provide participants with useful tools and strategies for identifying and managing the stressors that bring on burnout. By addressing mindset and resilience, this can impact productivity and professional effectiveness with clients, patients and students.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and prioritize beliefs and values in order to effectively begin implementing resilience strategies for SLPs and AuDs
  • Identify and explain the bridge from research to practice as it relates to resilience in the workplace.
  • Develop action plans that include research-based methods for building and maintaining resilience in the workplace

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: General Professional Affairs

R11 - Research to Practice for Assessment and Treatment of CAS (3 Hours)

Ruth Stoeckel, PhD, CCC-SLP, retired

Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) is a complex disorder requiring specialized expertise for both diagnosis and treatment. The ASHA Technical Report on CAS in 2007 marked the beginning of a new stage in understanding this disorder and spurred new research studies that using the report as background to both increase consistency in diagnosis and further develop treatment techniques. This session will review current research as it relates to clinical practice. Discussion will include review of assessment procedures, including standardized tools and dynamic assessment, and evidence-based approaches to treatment that can be adapted to address changing needs over the course of therapy. Interactive activities and video examples will be used. Clinical decision-making to address the unique needs of a given child will be emphasized.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Interpret responses during assessment to support differential diagnosis in children with severe speech sound disorders.
  • Describe dynamic assessment as part of a protocol for confident diagnosis
  • Compare motor-based versus phonological approaches to treatment

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Speech/Language Pathology

R12 - The Science of Reading: What SLPs Need to Know (1 Hour)

Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

Speech-language pathologists have specialized knowledge and expertise in language, reading, and writing. To provide evidence-based practice in assessment and intervention, what do SLPs need to know about the science of reading? The seminar will provide a summary of decades of research to answer questions about how children learn to read, the most effective approaches for teaching reading, and the characteristics of intense interventions for struggling readers. The seminar will focus on the evidence base that SLPs can use to understand and advocate for the important role that they play in reading and writing. We will discuss key findings and what those findings mean for how we identify struggling readers, deliver effective intervention, and collaborate with other educators. The seminar will include specific and practical examples of how SLPs can contribute to literacy efforts for all children.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the implications of the science of reading for SLP practice.
  • Describe key strategies in evidence based practice in reading and writing.
  • Discuss advantages of and challenges to SLPs involvement in literacy efforts.

 

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Speech/Language Pathology

R13 - Teaching New Words: Embedding Explicit Vocabulary Instruction in Storybook Reading (3 Hours)

Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

This interactive seminar will focus on explicit vocabulary instruction for preschool and early elementary school. Please bring a favorite children’s storybook for some hands-on practice choosing good words to teach, designing explicit instruction, and creating opportunities for interaction and engagement.

The seminar will begin with a brief overview of the evidence base for explicit vocabulary instruction embedded in storybooks and discuss the intervention research that has identified key components of effective vocabulary interventions. Next, participants will learn about a framework for the design of explicit, embedded vocabulary instruction in storybooks. Evidence-based guidelines will be presented for the selection of appropriate vocabulary targets and the design of systematic instruction. Sample lessons for preschool and early elementary school will be shared.

The seminar will include ways to maximize learning opportunities for children in the classroom and with parents. For example, ideas for including target vocabulary words in large and small group classroom activities will be provided. We will share strategies for differentiating instruction for children with a range of vocabulary skills. For example, recommendations for selection of vocabulary targets for children with very limited vocabulary. As well, the seminar will include techniques for assessment and progress monitoring to examine learning in response to vocabulary instruction.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize key strategies in evidence based practice in vocabulary instruction in preschool and early elementary school.
  • List criteria for choosing good words for explicit, embedded instruction in storybooks.
  • Describe ways to design effective, explicit instruction and learning opportunities for vocabulary.

 

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Speech/Language Pathology

R14 - Become an Influencer! How Supervisors can Affect Positive Change Through Feedback (1 Hour)

Jacob Gutshall, CCC-SLP, Walker Scottish Rite Clinic at Maryville University; Alison Manahan, CCC-SLP, Walker Scottish Rite Clinic at Maryville University

Feedback from seasoned professionals is essential for less experienced clinicians to achieve proficiency in therapeutic techniques in the fields of speech-pathology and audiology. Supervision is built into the preparation of our professions, and affects how and why supervisees conduct therapy in a variety of modalities. Continuing education requirements have become mandated by ASHA for supervisors to receive more training and excellent materials are now available for self study. However, a deeper look into the dynamic nature of feedback delivery and personality preferences can influence how effectively positive change can be achieved in an early career professional’s therapeutic abilities. The learner will better understand feedback methods to promote critical thinking and independent clinical methods.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify personality types in self and others.
  • Identify the effect of personality on communication and feedback preferences.
  • Perform data analysis to influence positive change.
  • Identify feedback methods to promote critical thinking and independence.

 

Time-Ordered Agenda:

  • 5 Minutes – Preparation for Supervision
    • Sharing Expertise
    • Active Learning
  • 5 Minutes – Supervisory Skill Development
    • Parallel Skills
    • The Science of Teaching
    • Adult Learning Theory
    • Multicultural Competence
  • 10 Minutes – ASHA Guidelines
    • Supervision Requirements
  • 10 Minutes – Supervisory Process
    • Expectations and Trust
    • Self-Awareness and Personality Types
    • Learning Styles
  • 20 Minutes – Communication and Feedback
    • Personal Goals and Data Documentation
    • Critical Thinking
    • EBP Decision Making
    • Self-Assessment
    • Reflection
    • Competency Evaluation
    • Assessment of Supervisor
  • 5 Minutes – Additional Training/Resources
  • 5 Minutes – Questions/Discussion

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Education and Training

R15 - Language and Literacy (L2) A Model for Early Literacy Assessment and Intervention (2 Hours)

Meaghan Goodman, PhD, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

This session with share an example response to intervention program, Language and Literacy (L2), utilized in the graduate speech-language pathology clinic at Maryville University. This program is offered to preschool children between the ages of four to five who could be at risk for future reading deficits. The author will review profiles for preschool children to first graders who are at risk for reading deficits. The evidence based components of this language and literacy program, which include the assessment and progress monitoring measures and the products and processes of the intervention approach will be discussed. Outcome measures from past participants of the L2 group will be shared. The author will discuss assessment and intervention tools that can be used to plan an effective early literacy program for the speech-language pathologist participant’s clinical setting.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss assessment and progress monitoring measures (freely & commercially available) that predict word reading outcomes.
  • Identify components of an effective two part early literacy program grounded in strong evidence base.
  • Discuss and plan an effective early literacy program for your clinical setting.

 

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Literacy

R16 - Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder (ANSD)- A Review of the Diagnosis, Etiology and Intervention Related Speech, Language and Hearing (1 Hour)

Abdullah Jamos, PhD, AuD, CCC-A, Missouri State University; Sarah Jones, AuD, CCC-A, Missouri State University

The diagnosis of Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder is defined by a condition in which the function of the hair cells in the cochlea is preserved however, the neural activity in the brainstem is disrupted. ANSD is confirmed by a multi-disciplinary team in which results obtained from diagnostic and behavioral evaluations are interpreted that may include medical imaging and genetic counseling. The audiological protocol recommended to confirm a bilateral or unilateral ANSD includes evoked potential testing of the outer hair cell function in the cochlea and identifying the presence of a cochlear microphonic and interpretation of the morphology and latency responses of the Eighth cranial nerve with rarefaction and condensation polarities. Due to the nature of maturational or permanent ANSD, the degree of hearing, speech recognition and development of speech and language varies significantly, and ongoing electrophysiological and behavioral assessments of speech and hearing development is essential as part of the intervention program. Parents and caregivers of children with ANSD should be enrolled in an aural rehabilitation program staffed by Audiologists, Speech Language Pathologists, and teachers of the deaf that focus on empowering the family with information about communication options and embraces multicultural considerations. Candidacy for amplification and/or cochlear implantation is considered as well as outcomes associated with these interventions. Possible outcomes after amplification or cochlear implantation may include improvements in detection and speech discrimination, however performance may be variable and investigation of performance in noise should be monitored. It is critical the Aural Rehabilitation Specialist is collaborating with the Intervention Team to monitor auditory perception and the development of speech and language.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe what is ANSD and what are the key clinical indicators leading to a differential diagnosis of ANSD.
  • Describe how is candidacy determined for amplification and cochlear implantation for an individual with ANSD.
  • Describe what assessments are utilized by the Aural Rehabilitation Specialist to evaluate and monitor auditory, speech and language development for an individual with ANSD.

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Aural Rehab

R17 - Improving Speech Intelligibility for Individuals With Down Syndrome (2 Hours)

Julie Hoffmann, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

Most children with Down Syndrome (DS) experience years of speech therapy. They often present with motor speech difficulties, whether from Childhood Apraxia of Speech, Dysarthria, or a mixed motor speech disorder. They are often diagnosed with a speech sound system disorder, due to articulation delays/errors and phonological processes. No matter, children with DS have compromised speech intelligibility due to poor articulation skills, motor speech involvement, oral-motor issues, slurring of speech, and limited self-awareness or self-monitoring—even after years of speech therapy. Progress is often slow and very gradual and overall speech intelligibility is a continued concern. Speech is often one of many areas that require therapy, besides language, cognition, learning, behaviors, occupational therapy, vision issues, medical issues, self-help, and more. So, what does the most current research tell us about speech and individuals with DS and the complexity of their speech disorders? What are the most effective approaches and techniques used to help these individuals with their speech? How can you better help your clients with DS who have continued speech issues? What special considerations do you need to think about as related to your therapy planning for these clients? How can we continue to make speech intelligibility a priority through adolescence and young adulthood?

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify factors related to DS and motor speech difficulties/speech issues that impact overall speech intelligibility.
  • Apply current research and learned speech therapy considerations, techniques and approaches for individuals with DS.
  • Implement self-monitoring techniques to improve speech intelligibility of individuals with DS.

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Motor Speech

R18 - Increasing Effective Use of AAC Within the Self-Contained Classroom (2 Hours)

Christina Loveless, MS, CCC-SLP, St. Louis University; Nicole Hartrum, MS, CCC-SLP, Francis Howell School District; Brittany Roberts, MA, Ed, Francis Howell School District; Courtney Bingel, MA, CFY-SLP, Select Rehabilitation

Many challenges are presented to the school-based SLP working with students using AAC in the self-contained classroom on a daily basis. Numerous treatment methods and techniques to address these AAC challenges in the classroom will be discussed. Effective collaborative strategies to support professionals and parents working with AAC implementation will be reviewed. This seminar will present a successful framework for AAC use in the self-contained classroom, including activities and checklists to improve natural use of AAC by students.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify treatment methods and techniques that will increase overall effective use of AAC within the self-contained classroom.
  • Determine effective collaborative strategies to support professionals and parents working with AAC implementation.
  • Select 3 activities to use within the classroom that will improve natural use of AAC.

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)

R19 - Persistent Misconceptions in Evaluation and Treatment of Adult Dysphagia (1 Hour)

Kristina Davis, MS, CCC-SLP, OSF Healthcare

Within the world of dysphagia ever evolving, Speech Language Pathologist (SLPs) are looking for sound methods for identification and treatment. SLPs learn from their foundational education, mentors, peers and evidence-based means, among others. Unfortunately, some outdated ideas continue to be utilized as common practice. Persistent misconceptions were identified via informal surveys by practicing Speech Language Pathologists serving adult dysphagia populations. The clinical focus of this systemic literature review summarizes the current evidence to enhance clinical decision making and promote patient advocacy.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • The learner will be able to list at least three persistent misconceptions SLPs use in identification and/or treatment of dysphagia.
  • The learner will be able to justify use of evaluation and/or treatment methods in clinical practice.
  • The learner will be able to identify credible evidence to prove/disprove two common dysphagia practices.

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Dysphagia

R20 - SLPs in Schools: Maximizing Educational Impact by Targeting Academic Language (1 Hour)

Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP, PhD, University of Missouri

Language lays the foundation for academic success across domains including reading and writing, mathematics, and science. To maximize impact, school based SLPs should apply their expertise to target language skills that are educationally relevant and improve students’ academic success. In this seminar, participants will learn about feasible and effective strategies for school-based SLPs to target educationally-relevant academic language. Highlights of recent research and educational policy on the importance of academic language will be presented. We will define and describe academic language targets, make connections with state learning standards, and share sample goals. Next, a framework for providing language intervention that is contextualized using academic curriculum and meaningful, educationally-relevant activities will be presented. We will share examples of intervention activities and provide resources and strategies to help SLPs address academic language.

This seminar is interactive; we will practice applying the strategies by writing academic language goals, identifying academic language targets, and developing intervention activities contextualized in academic curriculum. At the end of the seminar, SLPs will have learned feasible and effective strategies, ready to play an important role as language experts who can contribute to improve academic outcomes for students.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the connection between language intervention and academic outcomes.
  • Define academic language and list several types of academic language.
  • Describe a process for contextualizing language intervention in academic curriculum

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Speech/Language Pathology

R21 - Implementation of Instrumental Evaluations to Determine Swallowing Impairments (1 Hour)

Katherine Hoener, MA, CCC-SLP,

Speech language pathologists over diagnose dysphagia up to 70% of the time at the bedside, while silent aspiration is often missed with the use of clinical swallow evaluations (Ramsey, Smithard, & Kalra, 2003; Smiithard et al., 1998; Splaingard, Hutchins, Sulton, & Chaudhuri, 1988). As a profession we miss 14-20% of silent aspiration at bedside (Leder, 2002). PDPM surfaced in October 2019, further justifying the need to diagnose dysphagia with use of imaging in order to accurately identify impairments. The identification of impairments allows speech pathologists to create a treatment plan specific to physiological deficits. This has the potential to reduce unnecessary use of diet modifications, compensatory strategies, therapy sessions, and hospital admissions. Subjective screens at bedside will not be enough to justify reimbursement from Medicare due to the inability of clinicians to accurately identify these impairments and/or aspiration without imaging. There is currently no screening protocol proven to provide adequate predictive value for aspiration (O’Horo, Rogus-Pulia, Garcia-Arguello, Robbins, & Safdar, 2015). Types of screens in SNF/acute/outpatient include Masa/Mann, Yale Swallow Protocol, Clinical Bedside, and SAFE. These protocols can be performed by anyone, and therefore, are technically screens. As a profession, we need to hold ourselves accountable to higher standards of care and change these statistics. Incorporation of gold standard instrumental evaluations improves credibility within our profession and takes the guesswork out of dysphagia care. Modified barium swallow and Fiberoptic Endoscopy Evaluation are two gold standards of care to further diagnose and guide SLPs in identification of swallowing impairments. This allows appropriate recommendation for compensatory strategies, diet modifications, and treatment plans specific for the impairments. The MBSIMP is a standardization for Modified Barium Swallow Studies, which assist SLPs in determining the severity of 15 components of a swallow with use of a Likert scale. Incorporation of instrumental evaluations in the dysphagia plan of care will greatly improve SLP clinical decision making, education, and strategy incorporation to maximize outcomes for our patients.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define dysphagia screening and types of dysphagia screening tools for clinical bedside examinations.
  • Identify Gold Standards in dysphagia evaluation and components of each.
  • Understand financials and mortality associated with overuse of thickened liquids.

 

R22 - Dysphagia Management in Times of COVID-19: Challenges to Clinical Practice (3 Hours)

Luis F. Riquelme, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S

Dr. Riquelme will share his experiences at a large acute care hospital in Brooklyn, NY where he and his team of 8 speech-language pathologists provide direct care in all hospital units, acute rehabilitation and outpatient settings. The pandemic reached its height in NYC during March and April 2020, a time where given an initial shortage of protective equipment, he and his team provided frontline services to patients with COVID-19. Much was learned during this time and many clinical protocols were challenged. This session will address the evidence-base utilized by the Barrique SLP Team to guide dysphagia services and management to this complex population. Preliminary results from ongoing data review on services provided to this population will be shared. Focus on interdisciplinary care will also be provided.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe appropriate PPE for working with patients with COVID-19
  • Outline 3 protocols challenged by differing recovery patterns in patients with COVID-19
  • Mention 2 forms of evidence to inform clinical practice for this population

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate

R23 - A Smile Can Change the World: Inclusion at its Best (2 Hours)

Connecting to people who are different can be challenging, especially if you don’t know what to say or how to interact. Yet, we all share a desire for human connection and belonging. This session will give background on legislation on inclusion, education on appropriate conversations, and guidance on words and actions with dignity to be used with people who are differently abled. In addition, this session will educate on an individual’s personal and career journey while living with a disability

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate appropriate words and action to be used with differently abled people.
  • Describe current and past legislation efforts for people with disabilities.
  • Identify appropriate actions to take to support inclusion efforts in your work setting.

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multicultural