Saturday’s Program

Saturday, April 9, 2022

7:00 am – 7:30 am

Session 21 - Small Group Discussions 2

  • Animal Assisted Therapy – Dr. Samantha Washington and Dr. Susan Fulton
  • Fluency Disorders (tx developmental disabilities) – Dr. Greg Turner
  • Clinical Supervision – Amy Herren, Emily Obergoenner
  • Minimally Verbal Children with Suspected Childhood Apraxia of Speech – Julie Hoffman
  • Cancer and the SLP – Jennifer Lehr

The purpose of this Small Group Discussion is to explore the perspectives of MSHA members regarding animal assisted therapy, fluency disorders, clinical supervision, childhood apraxia of speech and cancer issues. Five breakout discussion will be available to address each topic.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List animals that can be used successfully in animal assisted therapy
• Summarize treatment methods for fluency disorders
• Describe therapy methods for children with suspected childhood apraxia of speech.

Level of Learning: Introductory

7:00 am – 8:00 am

Session 22- Poster Presentations - Part II

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Session 23 - Yoga Breathing in Speech Therapy: Application for Patients With Parkinson’s and Progressive Neurological Conditions

Jennifer Lane Lehr, MS, CCC-SLP, Aspire Therapy LLC

This presentation will shed light on the possible translation of research on the benefit of yoga breathing (pranayama) to the practice of speech-language pathology specifically for patients with Parkinson’s Disease and other progressive neurological conditions. Research on changes in patient’s resting breath patterns, lung volume and psychological and cognitive functioning will be discussed. Discussion and demonstration of yoga breathing techniques will give the participant tangible instruction and experience with these techniques for possible “Monday morning” application to their speech therapy sessions.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Summarize three key points from research supporting the use of yoga breathing techniques in speech therapy sessions with patients with Parkinson’s and other progressive neurological conditions.
• List at least three benefits of the use of yoga breathing as shown by research.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 24 - Equity Considerations for School Based SLPs

Joan Turner, MS, CCC-SLP, Special School District of St. Louis County
Klaire Brumbaugh, SLPD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

There is a growing research on the benefits of equity training and equity considerations within the school setting. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have a unique opportunity to ensure their instruction is based on the needs of each individual student as they plan IEPs and programming, but equity extends beyond speech and/or language therapy sessions. This session will include additional equity considerations for SLPs within the school setting.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define equity
• State three ways to ensure equity for students
• State three barriers to equity for students

Level of Learning: Introductory

8:00 am – 10:00 am

Session 25 - A Comprehensive Approach for Head and Neck Cancer, Part 1

Brooke Beilman, MS, CCC-SLP, Tactile Medical
Katherine Hoener, MA, CCC-SLP, Fox Rehabilitation

In this presentation you will learn about the importance of early intervention, instrumental evaluations with standardized assessments and the role of the speech-language pathologist in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with head and neck cancer. We will discuss the importance of baseline imaging, the benefits and differences between the use of FEES and VFSS/MBS, and the role of imaging to continue to monitor changes over time. The role of the interdisciplinary team as well as protocol development for improved patient outcomes will also be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List the benefits of early intervention with speech pathology and HNC
• Describe the components of interdisciplinary collaboration
• Describe the impact of lymphedema for communication and swallowing
• List acute and chronic challenges associated with head and neck cancer

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 26 - Addressing Speech Sound Production Issues with Toddlers: A Clinical Conundrum

Shari DeVeney, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Although speech-language pathologists (SLPs) treat many communication disorders with children under the age of three years, rarely do we assess and treat speech sound production as the primary concern for early intervention services. It’s a challenging area to address! Even though early therapeutic consideration of speech sound production skills appears to be warranted based on empirical and theoretical support, clinical challenges remain that affect both assessment and intervention practices. The assessment challenges include issues such as irregularities in available normative data for referencing speech sound development/mastery and limited information about the reliability of diagnostic measures when used with young children. For intervention, although there are numerous speech sound production treatment approaches appropriate for the pediatric population, a much smaller proportion are proposed to be appropriate for children under the age of three years. Of these, very few have empirical evidence supporting their use with children under the age of three years. In this presentation, we’ll explore challenges related to assessment and intervention approach selection. We’ll specifically focus our intervention discussion on five approaches – core vocabulary, cycles, naturalist recast, stimulability and psycholinguistic intervention – because these approaches can be used to treat functional speech sound disorders produced by toddlers and none require additional clinician training for implementation. We’ll also consider clinical action steps to navigate existing challenges because, despite limitations, SLPs working with toddlers have some tools and resources available to facilitate diagnostic procedures that allow for authentic decision-making as well as options for providing appropriate therapeutic services.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Discuss limitations in assessing speech sound productions of toddlers.
• Identify speech sound intervention approaches that have at least some available empirical support for use with toddlers.
• Describe opportunities to improve evidence-based practice in speech sound production assessment and intervention for children younger than three years of age.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:30 am – 10:00 am

Session 27 - Leveraging Peers in Language Intervention

Laura Justice, PhD, The Ohio State University

Peers provide important linguistic input to children with developmental language disorder (DLD). This session describes the ‘peer-effects’ phenomenon and how SLPs can cultivate this to enhance the impacts of language intervention.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the peer-effects phenomenon.
• Describe ways in which peers can be used to improve therapy efficacy.
• Identify evidence-based strategies to engage peers in therapy.

Level of Learning: Introductory

9:15 am – 10:15 am

Session 53 - Counseling for Adults and Children Who Have Hearing Loss

Saneta Thurmon, MA, CCC-SLP, CCC-A, Saint Louis University

Throughout our various work experiences within this profession, we have all wished we knew more about the “right thing to say” to our patients. Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent health conditions in the US with over 39 million adults having hearing loss and over 1.4 million children. With this high incidence, it is likely that most speech and hearing professionals will interact with someone who has a hearing loss at some point in their careers. Because the initial contact with adult patients or with parents may involve delivering “bad news” the therapeutic relationship often begins on a somber note. Aural rehabilitation/habilitation requires not only professional expertise, but empathy, sensitivity, an insight into human nature. The purpose of this session is to present a variety of counseling techniques that can be used by both SLPs and AuDs for effective counseling when working with patients with hearing loss. The session will help participants apply solution-centered interventions while teaching communication strategies to patients.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the benefits of counseling techniques from both informational counseling and personal adjustment counseling to use in aural rehabilitation/habilitation.
• List different strategies to improve psychosocial adjustment for children and adults with hearing loss through counseling techniques.
• Identify solution-centered interventions, along with auditory training and teaching communication strategies to patients with hearing loss.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 28 - Monitoring Social Competencies: Literature Review and Practical Application

Nargiza Buranova, MEd, University of Missouri – Columbia
Shannon Locke, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri – Columbia
Janine Stichter, PhD, University of Missouri – Columbia

Research continues to highlight the necessity to address, and progress monitor social competence of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Deficits in social skills have been associated with a higher risk for school dropout, bullying (Zablotsky et al., 2014) and poor after-school outcomes (MrPartland et al., 2014). Progress monitoring of students’ social competence allows practitioners to plan, adjust and design appropriate interventions for students to support them in improving their social skills. The purpose of this session is to provide evidence for the importance of monitoring progress of student social competence, describe one measure used in research, the General Social Outcome Measure (GSOM, Stichter et al., 2012), which was designed to progress these skills in students with ASD, and provide practitioners with examples and instructions on how to implement the same constructs and measurement methods in their practice.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Discuss the importance of progress monitoring of social skills of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).
• Define important components of social competency to monitor.
• Apply strategies to monitor social competence skills.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:15 am – 11:15 am

Session 29 - Breaking Barriers of Effective AAC Implementation in the Elementary and Preschool Classrooms

Kristen Ponce, MS, CCC-SLP, Park Hill School District

Effective AAC implementation is only as successful as the teams that are in place. There can be many barriers in the classroom that can negatively impact not only a students’ but also a teachers’ success with AAC implementation. In order for students to be successful with their AAC devices, teachers also must be successful. The job of a good speech-language pathologist is to recognize the barriers that may exist, not only for the students, but also for the teachers and then collaborate with the whole team to overcome those obstacles so that everyone is successful. Some of the obstacles that may arise could be in relation to what teachers have access to in their classroom. It could also be related to the number of AAC systems in place or what a teacher is feasibly able to implement due to the dynamic aspects of her classroom make up. Some barriers that may occur for students could be related to the actual AAC system itself; but quite often, are more related to outside behaviors such as the quality of the instruction or therapy or the lack of modeling or opportunities to explore their systems. This session will address each of the barriers that could exist for both teachers and students and explore options on how to overcome those barriers.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify at least three barriers that exist for teachers to successfully implement AAC within the classroom.
• Identify at least three barriers that exist for students to successfully use AAC.
• Apply at least three strategies to address both teacher and student barriers to successful AAC implementation.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 30 - Recruitment and Retention of Ethnic Minority Students in CSD

Kylie Helm, MA, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas
Karina Saechao, MA, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

Diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) efforts are on the rise in academia. However, the ASHA Leader reports that 92 percent of SLPs identify as White, non-Hispanic and just over half of these SLPs work in the school setting (A Demographic Snapshot of SLPs, 2019). According to the latest Census data, less than half of non-Hispanic White residents (49.9 percent) are under the age of 15. The implications of this suggests that most students in the United States now belong to a minority race or ethnic group. The gap in this area of speech-language pathology is that only approximately 8 percent of practitioners identify as a race other than White, Non-Hispanic, however, most students served by speech-language pathologists identify as people from racial and ethnic backgrounds other than White. The call to action is the need for increased racial, ethnic and linguistic diversity within the field to better serve these ever-growing populations. Additionally, recent research suggests that college students from minority ethnic backgrounds are more likely than their White peers to drop out of college. Specifically, Black students have the highest dropout rate followed by Hispanic students (College Dropout Rates, 2021). The purpose of this presentation is to provide evidenced-based knowledge to educators on how to recruit, support, advocate for, and retain students of minority race and ethnic groups in post-baccalaureate and graduate degree programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify at least one recruitment strategy for students from ethnic minority backgrounds.
• Identify at least one retention strategy for students from ethnic minority backgrounds.
• Support students of ethnic minority backgrounds for graduate school studies and demands.
• Support students of ethnic minority backgrounds through their program’s coursework and clinical work.

Level of Learning: Introductory

10:15 am – 12:15 pm

Session 31 - Ethics, Competence and Critical Thinking: A Big Pill to Swallow

Ed Bice, MEd, CCC-SLP, IOPI Medical, LLC

The word pathology refers to the study of disease in general, incorporating a wide range of research fields and evidence-based practices. The title “speech-language pathologist” suggests clinicians spend their careers studying and learning. However, a chart to direct therapy is much easier than critical thinking. But is it ethical? This session examines the principles of competence, ethics and the role of critical thinking. Practical examples of how critical thinking can promote ethical, evidence-based practice will be explored.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Recall four statements from the ASHA Code of Ethics
• Name four components of competence
• Summarize the role of questions in critical thinking
• List four essential areas of knowledge needed for competence in managing swallowing

Time-Ordered Agenda:
10 minutes – The role of ethics fit in evidence-based practice
25 minutes – The ethics of competence
25 minutes – Patient autonomy
20 minutes – Self-assessment tools
30 minutes – Practical application of ethical principles
10 minutes – Q and A

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 32 - Pediatric Speech Sound Disorder Intervention Approaches and Target Selection

Shari DeVeney, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Speech sound disorders (SSDs) represent one of the most common communication impairments across pediatric populations. Even so, SSDs are often considered to be of minor concern in a child’s development. On the contrary, children with SSD are at substantial risk for long-term negative literacy, language and social outcomes. Because of this, it’s critical we implement evidenced-based treatment and have varied SSD intervention strategies we can utilize with proficiency and confidence. What we do and how we do it matters to children with SSD and their future. To that end, two of the most important decisions speech-language pathologists (SLPs) make when treating children with SSD are the approach to use in intervention and the appropriate speech sound targets to address. In this session, I will review evidence-based treatment approaches best suited for different subtypes of SSD and present factors SLPs could consider when selecting treatment targets in therapy. For each target selection factor, I will discuss both research and clinical considerations (e.g., for stimulability, should stimulable sounds be targeted or not?). The main objective of this seminar is to arm clinicians with current and evidence-based information about intervention approaches and target selection strategies so they can match the right intervention and speech sound targets with each child’s needs. Additionally, I hope to motivate SLPs to use a variety of SSD intervention approaches in their clinical practice and connect them with resources they can use to learn more about different approaches.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Discuss the importance of matching appropriate speech sound disorder intervention approaches with the needs and profile of the child.
• Describe key considerations in target selection.
• Identify resources to support implementation of varied intervention approaches for treating pediatric SSD.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:30 am – 11:30 am

Session 33 - Investigating the Use of A Dichotic Music Task

Susan Fulton, PhD, CCC-A, Southeast Missouri State University

Dichotic listening tasks are a standard part of an auditory processing evaluation and are used to evaluate selective attention and lateralization of brain function. Typically, listeners are presented with two different auditory stimuli in each ear simultaneously. Depending on the task, listeners are asked to pay attention to one or both stimuli. Typically, stimuli are comprised of syllables, words, or sentences. Although non-linguistic stimuli are encouraged as part of an auditory processing evaluation, few non-linguistic dichotic measures are clinically available. This study investigated the use of simple nursery songs as dichotic stimuli in 68 young adult listeners (18-40 years of age). Digital piano recordings of songs (e.g., Itsy Bitsy Spider, BINGO) were generated by a professional musician and composer. The songs were then organized randomly into a dichotic task, with 10 trials for each ear. Participants completed a hearing screening to ensure normal hearing, the Dichotic Music task, the SCAN-C Dichotic Sentences Task and a two-digit dichotic numbers task. Two different runs were used for each dichotic task, targeting each ear individually. The generation of the stimuli and study results will be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe benefits of using dichotic stimuli in an auditory processing evaluation.
• Discuss the creation of a dichotic music listening task.
• Describe study results and outcomes.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Session 34 - Stuttering is Verbal Diversity: What SLPs Need to Know

Nina Reeves, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-F ASHA Fellow, Frisco Independent Schools

As our understanding of the diversity of our students with communication challenges grows, SLPs need to know how to assess their own biases and how to help their students deal with societal stigma. This session will help SLPs more mindful of how they talk about stuttering and the messages they send in therapy. Following an expanded FAQ section, you will walk away feeling prepared and more comfortable and confident in your therapy planning and use your new (or validated) knowledge to the benefit of your students who stutter and their families.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Name at least four microagressions that can occur during the course of stuttering therapy
• Identify three shifts in therapy practices that create a supportive environment for students who stutter
• List three ways to enhance outcomes by helping students learn to deal with potential societal stigma of stuttering

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Session 35 - Implementing Speech Perception Intervention in Children With SSD

Elizabeth Roepke, PhD, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

Many children with articulation and phonology disorders also have deficits affecting speech perception. In this session, practical strategies for assessing speech perception skills and for implementing speech perception intervention are presented. Intervention approaches covered include ear training, error detection, and minimal pair approaches. Participants will be introduced to tablet-based and online perception intervention resources. In addition, research has found that incorporating phonological awareness intervention may improve the literacy outcomes of children with SSD. Practical strategies for assessing and targeting phonological awareness during articulation tasks are presented, including one-minute phonological awareness drills.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Summarize the research on speech perception and phonological awareness deficits in children with speech sound disorders.
• Name three approaches to assessing speech perception in children with speech sound disorders.
• Identify three approaches for implementing speech perception and phonological awareness activities during intervention.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

12:30 am – 2:15 pm

Session 36 - President's Celebration and Keynote - Murphy's Don't Quit

Colleen Murphy, BA, and Lauren Murphy, MA, authors, Murphys Don’t Quit, 5 Keys to Unlocking Hope When Life Seems Hopeless

After being struck by a car, Lauren Murphy, suffered severe brain damage. She remained in the hospital unidentified for several hours, the doctors referred to her injuries as catastrophic, she was not expected to survive. Doctors suspected that if she did survive, she would most likely never be able to feed herself, walk, talk or understand spoken words. Through hard work and determination and over 2,000 hours of speech therapy ,Lauren battled severe aphasia and regained the ability to verbally communicate. Today, with the help of her mother Colleen, she travels throughout the country sharing her story of grit, perseverance and never giving up!

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the benefits of thinking outside the box and finding creative ways to motivate.
• Determine that impossible is often possible.
• Distinguish the benefits of family involvement.
• Identify the effectiveness of hope and perseverance.

Level of Learning: Introductory

2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Session 37 - A Comprehensive Approach for Head and Neck Cancer, Part 2

Brooke Beilman, MS, CCC-SLP, Tactile Medical
Katherine Hoener, MA, CCC-SLP, Fox Rehabilitation

In this presentation you will learn about the importance of early intervention, instrumental evaluations with standardized assessments and the role of the speech-language pathologist in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with head and neck cancer. We will discuss the importance of baseline imaging, the benefits and differences between the use of FEES and VFSS/MBS, and the role of imaging to continue to monitor changes over time. The role of the interdisciplinary team as well as protocol development for improved patient outcomes will also be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List the benefits of early intervention with speech pathology and HNC
• Describe the components of interdisciplinary collaboration
• Describe the impact of lymphedema for communication and swallowing
• List acute and chronic challenges associated with head and neck cancer

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Session 38 - What Schools Need From Audiologists

Laura Scott, MS

Students in Missouri are served in different ways. Some come from families with Deaf experience, yet others have never even met a person who has hearing loss. Some families live within more populated areas with more services convenient to them. Others live in very rural areas and availability of services is often limited. The audiologist is usually the first point of contact for these families. The second contact is typically the school through their Early Childhood and Outreach programs. What can audiologists do to make sure that the family and the school have enough information to provide the best possible services for each child?

Questions will be addressed to think outside the box. What is the best way to communicate with the family and the school? Who should you speak with at the school? How can you be involved in educational decisions? What ideas and suggestions can the audiologist offer to boost the child’s success? Documents and resources will be shared. Discussions will be held to problem solve difficult situations. School representatives and audiologists are invited to join this learning opportunity.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Effectively communicate with school professionals concerning the impact to education of a child’s hearing.
• Perform the role of audiologist as part of the IEP process.
• Problem solve solutions for unique issues concerning students and parents as support to schools.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Session 39 - Representation More Than Matters: It’s Essential and Should Be HIGHLY Valued

Meaghan Goodman, PhD, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

The field of speech-language pathology practitioners is overwhelmingly white. White bias influences how we decorate our therapy spaces and the therapy materials we utilize in those spaces. But not everyone we serve is white. How do we, as practitioners, demonstrate dedication to inclusion and representation? This session will review the importance of recognizing one’s own racial bias, discuss the importance of representation in our spaces and in our therapeutic materials and share resources for diversifying space and materials.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Name steps to identify their own racial bias.
• Discuss the importance for children of all ethnicities to see diversity in therapeutic spaces and in therapy materials.
• Reflect on their own therapeutic space and consider what materials need more representation.
• Access resources to diversify therapy spaces and materials.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 40 - Screening for and Understanding Reading Disabilities

Elizabeth Norton, PhD, Northwestern University

Early identification and intervention for reading disabilities such as dyslexia are associated with better outcomes for children and more efficient use of school resources. SLPs are ideally suited to support literacy screening because of their knowledge of language development, which is at the heart of many pre-reading measures that predict later reading ability. This session reviews the scientific date on when and how to effectively screen for reading problems. We will discuss evidence-based practice for the constructs to include in screening, as well as how to select specific instruments/measures to implement. SLPs can use this information to advocacte for and participate in screening for reading disabilities.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Explain the need and rationale for early literacy screening.
• Describe the possible roles of the SLP in screening practices.
• Describe the scientific evidence for components of an effectice screening battery.
• Identify measures appropriate for early literacy screening.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 42 - Student Technical Session

2:30 pm – 5:45 am (15 minute break included)

Session 41 - Practical FUN Autism Intervention and Resources

Belinda Worley, MS, CCC-SLP, Bootheel Pediatric Therapy LLC, author, An Autism Journey of Hope

This session will take you on a journey through autism that will help you understand the importance of movement and early intervention for this growing population. Not only is movement essential, it is fun as well. It is time to get up from your therapy table and get creative in your home, classroom, and therapy settings to utilize cost-effective therapy solutions. Therapy tools and supplies can be costly, but with a little creativity your children will enjoy therapy like never before. Participants will be provided with practical techniques and strategies to use in their next therapy session. Participants will be provided with practical resources that will be beneficial to the therapist as well as the teachers and families served.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Recognize the primary characteristics and patterns of development in infants and toddlers who have or are at risk for developing autism spectrum disorders.
• Identify the various treatments and resources available to children with autism spectrum disorder.
• Implement sensory integration strategies through problem solving to improve visual, auditory and motor development in young children with autism.
• Select fun, practical, inexpensive items that be be used in therapy sessions to help engage the young child with autism.

Level of Learning: Introductory

3:45 pm – 5:45 pm

Session 43 - Documentation to Drive Patient Care

Ed Bice, MEd, CCC-SLP, IOPI Medical, LLC.

Documentation is often the least favorite part of the day. The problem is often compounded by the feeling that click boxes and required fields in the electronic medical record dictate clinical practices. This session will challenge clinicians to develop documentation that drives evidence-based practice using meaningful language and quantitative measures.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List five pieces of information to include in a clinical swallow evaluation and how to document them.
• Name three types of imaging and the results should be documented.
• List four questions that should be considered to develop a functional goal.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

4:45 pm – 5:45 pm

Session 44 - AAC Supported Literacy Instruction

Meaghan Goodman, PhD, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

This session will review the importance of literacy instruction for preschool to school-age children who utilize Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). Evidence-based literacy strategies and activities will be presented. Lastly, participants will be invited to interact with low, mid, and high tech AAC devices to trial through activities and to better understand what considerations should be made based on how language is organized within a device.
*This session is limited to 30 participants.*

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Discuss strategies for incorporating the AAC user in early literacy instruction.
• Identify alternative and augmentative options to engage children in literacy instruction.
• Practice strategies and alternative & augmentative options to engage children in literacy instruction.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 45 - NSSHLA Share Session

The NSSLHA Share Session will comprise of NSSLHA members and advisors from eight universities in Missouri. The members will share their chapter’s successes and ideas, as well as gain information from other chapters to improve their NSSLHA meetings, membership, philanthropic events and participation with National NSSLHA.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Increase knowledge for events related to the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association
• Students/advisors will return to their university with ideas related to dues, philanthropic events, and professional advocacy.
• Improve NSSLHA Executive Board meetings to improve overall organization of the Chapter.
• Improve Knowledge of benefits with membership of National NSSLHA Update.

Level of Learning: Introductory

6:30 am – 8:15 pm

Quest for the Cup and Tailgate Party

University teams comprised of top-notch students compete in a quiz bowl format to see which team can answer the most Praxis practice questions correctly! This session is designed for students preparing to take the Praxis examination, as well as professionals who want to refresh their basic knowledge skills while learning in a fun, interactive and competitive environment. The Quest for the Cup is one of the MSHA Convention’s most anticipated annual events. Let the games begin!

0.1 ASHA CEU available for the Quest for the Cup Competition (7:15 pm – 8:15 pm)

Level of Learning: Intermediate