Saturday’s Program

7:00 am – 8:00 am

Session 31 - Poster Presentations - Part II

Click here to view Poster Sessions – Part II

Track: Student, Multi-Interest Level: Various

8:00 am – 10:00 am

Session 32 - The Three Pillars of Pneumonia From Aspiration

John Ashford, PhD, CCC-SLP, SA Swallowing Services, PLLC

This presentation examines, with depth, the complexities and interrelationships of the three primary conditions, or the three pillars of pneumonia, necessary for the development of pneumonia associated with laryngeotracheal aspiration. Understanding the contributions each makes toward pneumonia development provides avenues for preventative intervention and management.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe and discuss the three primary causes attributed to the development of pneumonia from aspiration
• Utilize knowledge of the three primary causes attributed to pneumonia from aspiration development to better assess patients with dysphagia
• Identify elements of each cause of pneumonia from aspiration and plan better intervention strategies for reducing or preventing pneumonia occurrences.

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Advanced

Session 33 - Tips, Tricks and Tools to Bring LPAA Into Your Therapy

Sarah Baar, MA, CCC-SLP, Honeycomb Speech Therapy

The Life Participation Approach to Aphasia (LPAA) is consistent with a person-centered care treatment model in speech therapy. This presentation focuses on how the clinical SLP can use the LPAA in language therapy from day one, with a focus on treating the language impairment.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List two tools you could use during your Assessment to promote a Life Participation Approach.
• Identify five categories that could be used to develop personally-relevant stimuli for language therapy
• List three components a home program should contain to promote participation and improvement.

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Introductory

Session 34 - Vestibular Disorders and Diagnostic Guidelines

Julie Honaker, PhD, CCC-A, Cleveland Clinic

Historically, interpretation of vestibular disorders in the audiology clinic has fit within a peripheral versus central vestibulopathy categories. However, advances in our understanding of the complexities of the vestibular system, along with new diagnostic guidelines allow audiologists to provide more detailed descriptions of complex case histories and clinical testing, which should lead to improved management and patient outcomes. This presentation will provide a case-by-case approach to understanding typical and atypical vestibular disorders.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify clinical signs and symptoms associated with typical and atypical vestibular disorders
• Recognize vestibular assesssment patterns in typical and atypical vestibular disorders
• Reference diagnostic criteria for typical and atypical vestibular disorders

Track: Audiology Level: Intermediate

Session 35 - Increasing Effective Use of AAC Within the Self-Contained Classroom

Christina Loveless, MS, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University; Nicole Hartrum, MS, CCC-SLP, Francis Howell School District; Courtney Bingel, BS, Saint Louis University; Nicole Morgan, BS, Saint Louis University; Brittany Roberts, MA, Ed, Francis Howell School District

Many challenges are presented to the school-based SLP working with students using AAC in the self-contained classroom on a daily basis. Numerous treatment methods and techniques to address these AAC challenges in the classroom will be discussed. Effective collaborative strategies to support professionals and parents working with AAC implementation will be reviewed. This presentation will present a successful framework for AAC use in the self-contained classroom, including activities and checklists to improve natural use of AAC by students.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify treatment methods and techniques that will increase overall effective use of AAC within the self-contained classroom.
• Determine effective collaborative strategies to support professionals and parents working with AAC implementation.
• Formuate three activities to use within the classroom that will improve natural use of AAC.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

Session 36 - Pediatric Hearing Loss: Partnering With Parents to Optimize Outcomes

Karen Muñoz, EdD, Utah State University

Through effective provider-parent partnerships, audiologists and speech-language pathologists can help parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing recognize barriers to intervention and identify effective solutions. Parents can experience a variety of barriers. Many parents are unfamiliar with hearing loss and may have internal barriers (e.g., accepting the hearing loss diagnosis, feeling sad or lacking confidence about how to manage the technology) in addition to external barriers (e.g., financial concerns, lack of a support network). To effectively help parents, audiologists and speech-language pathologists need to counsel each family according to their unique needs by assessing for and addressing internal and external barriers that are interfering with the intervention process. Effective partnerships can help parents engage in shared decision-making and work through challenges that arise. This session will describe communication skills that support your ability to obtain a comprehensive understanding of parent values, goals and barriers. Resources will be shared to promote partnerships with parents.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe common barriers parents experience that interfere with treatment adherence
• Describe person-centered communication attitudes and skills to engage parents
• List three parent-professional partnership resources to help optimize child outcomes

Track: Multi-Interest, Audiology Level: Intermediate

Session 37- Finishing Strong: Clinical Fellowship Decision-Making - CEUs not available

Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri-Columbia

This presentation focuses on the importance of making good professional decisions when choosing a clinical fellowship practice setting. An overview of practice settings, the importance of the Clinical Fellow (CF)-Mentor relationship, how to find a job, how to vet Mentors, 2020 changes and common pitfalls to avoid will be explored. Understanding that the CF represents the final piece of a new clinician’s education with be emphasized.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe two CF practice settings
• Explain the 2020 changes in mentor requirements
• Discuss the elements of a successful CF-Mentor relationship
• Identify two positive and two negative signs when weighing a job offer

Track: Student Level: Introductory

Session 38 - Paired Treatment Approaches for Speech Sound Disorders: Minimal Pair, Maximal Opposition, Multiple Opposition

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

There are numerous evidence-based treatment approaches for preschool and school-age children with speech-sound disorders. This session will review three approaches to selecting and contrasting two or more sounds during speech-sound disorder treatment: minimal pair (misarticulated sound paired with its typical substitution), maximal opposition (two misarticulated sounds that differ greatly from one another) and multiple opposition (multiple misarticulated sounds that are all replaced within the same substitute). The evidence supporting each treatment approach will be reviewed. Sound selection will be illustrated using hypothetical clinical cases. Through these examples, clinicians will gain an understanding of what children each approach is appropriate for.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Develop a treatment plan based on a traditional minimal pair approach
• Develop a treatment plan based on a maximal opposition/empty set treatment approach
• Develop a treatment plan based on a multiple opposition treatment approach

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

8:15 am – 11:15 am

Session 39 - Trust as a Cornerstone of Communication: It All Starts Here!

Kim Gerth, MA, CCC-SLP, Rockwood School District; Kim Catau, MS, OTR/L, Rockwood School District; Cheryl Livingston, MS, CCC-SLP, Special School District of Saint Louis County

At the 2019 MSHA Convention, we presented Ensuring a Foundation for Communicative Competence: The Buck Stops Here! Rather than serving as a continuation of that presentation at the 2020 MSHA Convention, however, Trust as a Cornerstone of Communication will be a prequel to the information that we provided last year. It is difficult for students on the autism spectrum to develop into independent, effective communicators without the influence of trusted adults who encourage growth. Establishing a strong foundation, based on trust and motivation, will be presented as a key factor in the ability to move along a continuum towards independent use of functional communication in a variety of contexts. Use of best practices may not result in progress if the child does not fully trust the adults who are implementing the strategies. The implications of respecting the child’s sensory needs, recognizing intent and assisting in the development of functional motor planning for communication will also be discussed.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the role that trust may play in the development of independent, functional communication skills.
• Define intent and describe why it is necessary before true communication can take place.
• List the five general principles for interacting with students and how they are essential to the cornerstone of trust.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

10:15 am – 11:15 am

Session 40 - AAC Implementation Playground - Part 1 (This session is limited to 75 attendees. Attendance will be first come, first served.)

Amanda Hettenhausen, MA, CCC-SLP, PRC-Saltillo; Deanna Severson, MS, CCC-SLP, PRC-Saltillo

This session will be a playground for participants to explore a variety of tools offered by PRC-Saltillo to support AAC implementation. Given the advancements in and increased access to technology, a wide variety of AAC solutions are available. Although hardware and software are ever changing, the need for quality therapeutic and classroom support remains constant. Language learning activities within a classroom, as well as the routine opportunities to interact, are the most natural conditions for a student who uses an AAC system/device to learn. The challenge for the educational team is how to integrate classroom activities so that the student is able to learn academic skills, participate in conversational routines and learn to use their AAC system. Create implementation materials and begin to address the challenge of implementing AAC. Participants will have hands-on experience with implementation tools (e.g., ChatEditor, PASS Software, ExploreAAC and AAC Language Lab) to help address the challenges of implementing AAC.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss free product resources from PRC-Saltillo.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Utilize ChatEditor to create a variety of visual supports for WordPower.
• Utilize PASS software to create a variety of visual supports for Unity/LAMP.
• List at least five available tools to support AAC implementation in the classroom.
• Identify an implementation material to support AAC in the classroom.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

10:15 am – 12:15 pm

Session 41 - Understanding Oropharyngeal Swallowing Biomechanics and Their Application to Dysphagia Intervention

John Ashford, PhD, CCC-SLP, SA Swallowing Services, PLLC

This presentation examines anatomical, neurological and biomechanical factors relating to oropharyngeal swallowing peristalsis and airway protection and to the consequences of impairment to these systems. Better understanding of underlying unique anatomical, neurological and biomechanical functions leads to more concise diagnostic decisions and better implementation of effective therapeutic intervention.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the muscles of oropharyngeal deglutition and describe their functions and contributions to the swallowing event
• Describe and discuss specific biomechanical actions that are required for safe and efficient deglutition
• Idebtifty effective intervention strategies to address specific impaired biomechanical functions to improve swallowing safety and efficiency

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Advanced

Session 42 - More Than a Test Score: Functional Assessment and Goal-Setting

Sarah Baar, MA, CCC-SLP, Honeycomb Speech Therapy

Person-centered care is newly emphasized as a best practice in general health care as well as speech-language pathology. However, this approach contrasts significantly with the previously emphasized medical model and impairment-based testing and goals. Assessment and goal setting are fundamental steps in shaping a therapist’s treatment for a highly-meaningful and person-centered approach. This course uses best practices, evidence and practical ideas to describe a person-centered assessment model and functional goal-writing frameworks for the adult neurogenic population, with practical examples from speech-language pathology across settings, from acute care to home health to outpatient therapy.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List four person-centered outcomes (PCO’s) that can be used to measure participation/activity.
• Utilize three evidence-based frameworks to write person-centered, measureable goals.
• Describe three components of a person-centered assessment that comply with best practice and set the stage for a person-centered approach in speech therapy.

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Introductory

Session 43 - BPPV or What Could It Be?

Julie Honaker, PhD, CCC-A, Cleveland Clinic

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is notably the most common peripheral vestibular disorder in adults. What about atypical BPPV presentation? What variations are possible and what does not fit a pattern for BPPV? Are there central pathologies that mimic BPPV? This presentation aims to provide the range of BPPV presentation in order to understand what should and should not be included as a BPPV diagnosis. This presentation will also describe updated treatment techniques for atypical BPPV presentation. Hands-on instruction will be provided on how to diagnosis and treat BPPV.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify typical and atypical BPPV presentation patterns
• Identify central anomalies in patients presenting with positional vertigo
• Demonstrate techniques to diagnose and treat BPPV

Track: Audiology Level: Intermediate

Session 44 - Groups That Work

Michelle Vomund, MEd, CCC-SLP, Maryville University; Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri-Columbia

Individuals with aphasia and other acquired cognitive-communication or speech difficulties often receive 1:1 speech-language or cognitive-communication therapy during acute and subacute care or as outpatients. With the introduction of Medicare rules changes and as implementation of the Patient Driven Payment Model (PDPM) spreads across settings, each therapy discipline may be encouraged to employ concurrent and group therapy when treating their patients. Literature in our field on the use of group-based therapies demonstrates that it can provide a natural, social rehabilitation environment across populations and contexts. This presentation will look at the strong evidence base for provision of group therapy services and provide an introduction to small and large group therapy, group design and purpose, goal-setting for group members and development of appropriate activities.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the product LOUD Crowd(r).

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Integrate current research regarding group treatment and implementation for people with aphasia and related speech and cognitive-communication impairments
• Discuss documentation for group treatment sessions that is compliant with payer sources and best-practice
• Develop goals and generate group activities to address them

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Introductory

Session 45 - Ethical Dilemmas in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology: It’s Complicated!

The topic of ethics is a pervasive and sometimes challenging one, applicable to all professionals, practice settings and types of clients. Many ethical situations are complex with multiple factors and considerations that must be weighed to reach the best possible outcome. Applicable components of the Missouri Board of Registration for the Healing Arts Rules and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Code of Ethics will be highlighted and a decision-making model will be delineated which can be applied as practice issues are encountered. Ethical issues and applicable principles specific to health care, private practice, university and school-based settings, in addition to ethical use of social media, supervision and several other areas of practice will be discussed. Scenarios depicting potential ethical violations and dilemmas will be analyzed and deliberated by participants.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Delineate components of an ethical decision-making model
• Analyze scenarios that constitute potential ethical violations and dilemmas
• Implement the ASHA Code of Ethics as well as state regulations in the practice of audiology and speech-language pathology

Track: Multi-Interest, Ethics Level: Intermediate

Session 46 - The Complexity Approach to Speech Sound Disorder Treatment: Sound Selection

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

Children with speech-sound disorders make up a large portion of the caseload for school-based SLPs who work with students ages three to seven. But SLPs rarely use the complexity approach in treating these children due to a lack of familiarity with the approach, despite the evidence to support its use. This presentation will review the evidence demonstrating the efficacy of the complexity approach and will walk clinicians through sound selection within this approach. Specific elements of sound selection that will be reviewed are: characteristics of the sounds (i.e., developmental norms and language universals); characteristics of the child’s speech (i.e., accuracy and stimulability). The presenter will use case studies to illustrate how to select complex treatment targets. This presentation will build on the presenter’s open access tutorial on this same topic: https://doi.org/10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0082. Attendees do not need to read the tutorial in advance of attending the presentation.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the child and sound characteristics that make targets complex
• Assess these child and sound characteristics in children on their caseload
• Utilize assessment information to select complex targets for individual children

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Session 48 - AAC Implementation Playground - Part 2 (This session is limited to 75 attendees. Attendance will be first come, first served.)

Amanda Hettenhausen, MA, CCC-SLP, PRC-Saltillo; Deanna Severson, MS, CCC-SLP, PRC-Saltillo

This session will be a playground for participants to explore a variety of tools offered by PRC-Saltillo to support AAC implementation. Given the advancements in and increased access to technology, a wide variety of AAC solutions are available. Although hardware and software are ever changing, the need for quality therapeutic and classroom support remains constant. Language learning activities within a classroom, as well as the routine opportunities to interact, are the most natural conditions for a student who uses an AAC system/device to learn. The challenge for the educational team is how to integrate classroom activities so that the student is able to learn academic skills, participate in conversational routines and learn to use their AAC system. Create implementation materials and begin to address the challenge of implementing AAC. Participants will have hands-on experience with implementation tools (e.g., ChatEditor, PASS Software, ExploreAAC and AAC Language Lab) to help address the challenges of implementing AAC.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss free product resources from PRC-Saltillo.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Utilize ChatEditor to create a variety of visual supports for WordPower.
• Utilize PASS software to create a variety of visual supports for Unity/LAMP.
• List at least five available tools to support AAC implementation in the classroom.
• Identify an implementation material to support AAC in the classroom.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

12:30 pm – 2:15 pm

Session 49 - President's Celebration - From Education to Invitation

Sarah Buffie, MSW, LSW, Soul Bird Consulting

How might we begin to see ourselves as co-creators versus care takers? How might we offer a felt sense of feeling safe, seen and heard? Sometimes our role as professionals leaves little room for the personal. In this session we will be exploring a lens that invites personalism over professionalism as a way to reimagine our role in the lives of those we support.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the services of Soul Bird Consulting.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the magitutde of social isolation for those with devalued labels.
• Recall Belonging as a central resilience factor.
• Differentiate between services/supports and roles/resilience.

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Introductory

2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Session 50 - An Introduction to Ethical Decision-Making in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology

Theresa Rodgers, MA, CCC-SLP, ASHA-F, EdS (LD), SLP Consulting Services

Delineating what is ethical in the practice of audiology and speech-language pathology may not always be obvious or clear; rather, most situations are complex requiring not only recognition of the dilemma, but various factors which must be considered in deriving an appropriate solution. The Missouri Board of Registration for the Healing Arts Ethical Standards (contained within the Rules) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Code of Ethics (2016) will be highlighted, ethical frameworks will be described and a decision-making model will be delineated which can be applied as audiology and speech-language pathology practice issues are encountered.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Delineate common themes of ethical inquiries and adjudications
• Describe key considerations in resolution of ethical dilemmas
• Identify ethics resources applicable to audiology and speech-language pathology

Track: Multi-Interest, Ethics Level: Introductory

2:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Session 51 - Fun Time for the Non-FEES Clinician

John Ashford, PhD, CCC-SLP, SA Swallowing Services, PLLC

This presentation introduces basic FEES administration procedures, provided practice in recognizing pharyngeal and laryngeal landmarks as seen through a nasoendoscope and learning fundamental analysis schemes for both pharyngeal peristalsis and laryngeal airway protection. Audience participate in reviewing, scoring and analyzing video clips of swallowing impairments and determined intervention approaches based upon analyzed results.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the FEES administration protocol and discuss its rationale
• Describe and apply scoring schemes to quantify normal and abnormal behaviors discovered using the FEES procedure
• Analyze patterns of abnormal swallow behaviors identifying aberrant biomechanical actions and determining more appropriate intervention

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

Session 52 - Supervising From the Crossroads: The Intersection of Clinical Instruction, ASHA Standards and Ethics

Emily Buxbaum, MS, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University; Lauren Wright-Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

This session will define clinical education, its role in the graduate educational training program and how knowledge and skills in the area of are an integral component to successful completion of clinical practica across settings. Through case-based learning, the instructors will also define how ethical issues and student training may intersect and review examples of both ethical and questionable decisions and the outcomes of those decisions with respect to best practices in supervising and training graduate student clinicians.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify ASHA standards for certification and differing methods of evaluation/rating students in those standards.
• Describe at least two methods of supervision (SQF, reflective practice, strategic questioning)
• Identify ethical issues relevant to student supervision and describe resources to find information on how to address ethics issues with students

Track: Multi-Interest, Supervision Level: Introductory

Session 53 - Education is Power! Helping AAC Users Access School Curriculum

Shawna Dunnaway, MLS, OTR/L, ATP, Forbes AAC

As an AAC industry, we so often focus on what gets paid by funding sources sometimes losing focus on goals that take our AAC users to the next level. In this session, we will look at advancing students through the lifespan from early childhood through high school and into secondary education or transition into adulthood beyond basic face to face communication. How do we take advantage of features that we already may have access to improve a student’s access to their educational curriculum? Making use of advanced educational and global media extras can be used as a modality to teach improved access to language, education and global communication. This becomes increasingly important for individuals with alternative access needs such as switch scanning, headpointing, eyegaze and use of power wheelchair controls. Once we open this door of opportunity for our students, technology can lead way to maximizing opportunity and give students full access to life skills that they can take with them for life. This session will focus on educational extra features that can be integrated into Grid 3 software to improve curricular access for students as they move through early childhood, K-12 education, life skills transitioning and global communication into adulthood.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the product Grid 3 Integration of Tech.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify three extras to use with early childhood students to improve phonetic reading and writing skills for the nonverbal student.
• Identify three ways to access student curriculum through use of Grid 3.
• Identify three modalities to improve access to life skills through Grid 3.
• Distinguish how customization and use of global media will transition a student out of this role and into adulthood.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

Session 54 - Vestibular Assessment Across the Lifespan

Julie Honaker, PhD, CCC-A, Cleveland Clinic

VEMP, VNG, VHIT and more! This intermediate presentation will provide a comprehensive overview of the vestibular test battery and clinical practice guidelines for what measures to include and when. The importance of considering findings of the entire test battery to determine normal versus abnormal and peripheral versus central etiology will be presented. Case examples will be provided on patients across the lifespan.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify best-practice protocols for assessing patients in the vestibular clinic
• Discuss current trends in vestibular testing, including VEMP, VHIT and Risk of Falling Assessment
• Name essential componets of the vestibular test report

Track: Audiology Level: Intermediate

Session 55 - Navigating MTSS: Lessons Learned

Beth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District; Becky Szczesny, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District; Michelle Krahenbuhl, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District; Kelly Smith, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District

The SLP’s most difficult challenge in getting involved in MTSS is often getting started and keeping momentum in the process. This panel of district SLPs and coordinator will provide tips and techniques for getting started in MTSS, crucial skills for successful collaboration among the school team, methods for implementing speech and language interventions within an MTSS model, progress monitoring, incorporation of speech and language interventions into considerations for Missouri’s updated speech and language eligibility criteria and associated documentation methods and other lessons learned from one district’s perspective.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• State roles and responsibilities for an SLP’s role in MTSS.
• Describe a framework for structuring speech and language interventions within an MTSS model.
• Identify data based decision making strategies for students receiving interventions across tiered support systems.
• Summarize ideas for successful documentation of interventions when considering IDEA eligibility.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

2:30 pm – 5:30 pm

Session 56 - Literacy and Justice for ALL: Culturally Responsive Practices for SLPs in Literacy

Shurita Thomas-Tate, PhD, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University

In our increasingly diverse schools, culturally responsive practices support the achievement of ALL students by providing services that acknowledge and appropriately respond to the intersection of cultural needs that we and our students bring to interactions. One area that the speech-language pathologist (SLP) can make a huge impact in is literacy. Literacy is foundational to learning in the schools. Unfortunately, disparities in literacy outcomes has been a source of great educational disparity that directly correlates with future success and quality of life. However, literacy also has the potential to be a great source of equity when delivered in ways that values students’ cultures and identities. SLPs can and should be involved the prevention, assessment and intervention of literacy-based skills. SLPs can be agents of change for their students by helping student develop as readers, which can potentially change the trajectory of their lives. This presentation aims to provide participants with practical information about the context and nature of culturally responsive practices in literacy development.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the product Ujima Language and Literacy.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define cultural-responsiveness and associated terms
• Examine their cultural identities and stages of cultural responsiveness and develop a plan for growth
• Discuss the relationships between literacy and educational equity
• Apply culturally responsive practices to prevention, assessment and intervention of literacy skills

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

Session 57 - The SLP and Dyslexia: Principles, Content and Methods for Lesson Planning

Eva Trumbower, MS, CCC-SLP, Consultant, Center for Family Policy and Research, University of Missouri

It is clear that the SLP plays a critical role in the assessment and treatment for children with speech-language disorders and, more recently, there is evidence that the SLP has a significant role in assessment and intervention for children with written language difficulties including dyslexia. Knowledge of language systems and structure provides the SLP the opportunity to contribute to the improvement of literacy. In this session, the characteristics of dyslexia, comorbidity with disorders of speech and language and supporting principles, content and methods for intervention planning will be emphasized. Guidance from ASHA, the International Dyslexia Association, the International Literacy Association, the Center for Effective Reading Instruction, state and national standards for English Language Arts will be referenced.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• State the defining characteristics of written language disorders including dyslexia.
• Describe principles, content and methods of instruction for students with oral and written language disorders.
• Develop lesson plans for students based on the principles, content and methods for effective and supportive intervention for students demonstrating oral and written language disorders.
• Define the knowledge-base of the SLP in language and literacy learning and determine what additional knowledge is needed in the written modality.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

2:30 pm – 6:00 pm

Session 58 - Student Technical Session II

Click here to view Student Technical Sessions II

Track: Student, Multi-Interest Level: Various

3:45 pm – 5:45 pm

Session 59 - Taking Care: Resilience for Professionals

Sarah Buffie, MSW, LSW, Soul Bird Consulting

We know that growing resilience mitigates the effects of trauma. However, supporting someone else without building your OWN resilience can be challenging. In this session participants will grow in their understanding of nourishing their own resilience. Together we will engage in activities that integrate the mind and the body. The experiential nature of the afternoon will invite introspection as well as connection with others as a way to foster nourishment and well-being.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify ways to grow their own resilience.
• Engage in interactive exercises that integrate the mind and body.
• Identify ways to return to a state of balance and calm to reach states of regulation.

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Intermediate

4:45 pm – 5:45 pm

Session 60 - Become an Influencer! How Supervisors Can Affect Positive Change Through Feedback

Jacob Gutshall, MHS, CCC-SLP, Walker Scottish Rite Clinic at Maryville University; Alison Manahan, MA, CCC-SLP, Walker Scottish Rite Clinic at Maryville University

Feedback from seasoned professionals is essential for less-experienced clinicians to achieve proficiency in therapeutic techniques in the fields of speech-language pathology and audiology. Supervision is built into the nature of our professions and affects how and why supervisees conduct therapy in a variety of modalities. Continuing education requirements have become mandated by ASHA for supervisors to receive more training and excellent materials are now available for self study. However, a deeper look into the dynamic nature of feedback delivery and personality preferences can influence how effectively positive change can be achieved in a mentee’s therapeutic abilities. The learner will better understand feedback methods to promote critical thinking and independent clinical methods.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify personality types in self and others.
• Identify the effect of personality on communication and feedback preferences.
• Perform data analysis to influence positive change.
• Identify feedback methods to promote critical thinking and independence.

Track: Multi-Interest, Supervision Level: Intermediate

Session 61 - The Relationship of the Oral Pharyngeal and Esophageal Swallow

Brett Nickisch, MA, CCC-SLP, Kansas City VA Medical Center

This presentation will address the inter-relationship between the oral pharyngeal and esophageal swallow. Various esophageal disorders will be discussed including assessment and intervention for esophageal dysphagia. The role that the speech-language pathologist has in assessing dysphagia in the context of the entire swallow including an esophageal sweep during modified barium swallow studies will be addressed.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify various esophageal diagnoses and how they can impact the oral pharyngeal swallow.
• Define the speech-language pathologist’s role in assessment of esophageal function.
• Identify signs and symptoms that may indicate a referral to GI for further assessment of esophageal dysphagia.

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

Session 62 - Therapeutic Jurisprudence: Effect on Traditional Approaches to Cognitive Remediation in Elder Adults

Colleen Stewart, MS, CCC-SLP, JD, Therapy Management; Kim Oda, MS, CCC-SLP, Speak Out Loud, Brookdale Senior Living

Therapeutic jurisprudence as the study of the role of law as a therapeutic agent on the emotional/psychological function of society will be reviewed as well as the consequences of elder mystique upon traditional memory care. Remedial recommendations, functional assessment tools and evidenced based functional treatment and educational techniques will be reviewed. The purpose of the session will focus on how to preserve patient rights, dignity and choice, maintaining quality of life and reducing burden of care for family, caregivers and medical professionals, while demonstrating how speech therapists can complete formalized cognitive staging to reduce undesired behaviors while reducing the need for pharmacological interventions. Evidence-based alternative approaches will be reviewed through case study.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify three societal effects of nonintended therapeutic jurisprudence as related to cognitive function in adults
• Recall ways to overcome the elder mystique permeating our healthcare systems
• Differentiate between use of standardized cognitive testing and functional performance assessment
• Distinguish purpose and name evidence-based techniques of preserving cognitive care in aging adults

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

Session 47 - NSSLHA Share Session - NEW TIME

Kaitlyn Laughlin, BS, University of Central Missouri; Anna Backs, Maryville University; Kimberly Stewart, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Michelle Vomund, MEd, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

The NSSLHA Share Session will comprise of NSSLHA members and advisors from eight universities in Missouri. The members will share their chapter’s successes and ideas, as well as gain information from other chapters to improve their NSSLHA meetings, membership, philanthropic events and participation with National NSSLHA.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Increase knowledge related National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association chapter organizations.
• Share ideas related to dues, philanthropic events and professional advocacy.
• Improve NSSLHA Executive Board meetings to improve overall organization of the chapter.
• Improve knowledge of benefits with membership of National NSSLHA.

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Introductory

6:30 pm – 7:15 pm

Praxis Tailgate Party - CEUs not available

7:15 pm – 8:15 pm

Session Q - Quest for the Cup

University teams comprised of top-notch students compete in a quiz bowl format to see which team can answer the most Praxis practice questions correctly! This session is designed for students preparing to take the Praxis examination, as well as professionals who want to refresh their basic knowledge skills while learning in a fun, interactive and competitive environment. The Quest for the Cup is one of the MSHA Convention’s most anticipated annual events. Let the games begin!

Track: Student, Multi-Interest Level: Intermediate