Friday’s Program

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Session 4 - Dysphagia Management and Prevention in Head and Neck Cancer

Heather Lazarides, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, MHA, BJC Healthcare

Cancers of the head and neck (h/n) continue to be a common diagnosis for speech-language pathologists to manage. This presentation teaches how to complete a thorough h/n cancer evaluation, as well as implement a prophylactic dysphagia exercise program.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe current research for use of prophylactic swallowing exercises during radiation treatment.
  • Identify how to complete a swallowing evaluation for h/n cancer.
  • Describe changes common to head and neck cancer patients after radiation.
  • Implement swallowing rehab program for h/n patients.

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

8:00 am – 10:00 am

Session 5 - Maximizing Speech and Language Therapy For Preschoolers With Sensory Needs

Angela Adrian, MA, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University; Julie Hoffmann, MA, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

Come learn how to help your clients regulate their sensory needs and in turn optimize their participation, attention and success in therapy! Learn how to naturally infuse sensory tasks in your speech and language sessions. How can you encourage your sensory seekers and your sensory avoiders to be fully engaged in therapy? This session will provide simple ways you can modify your therapy tasks and/or the environment to enhance overall client progress.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify a variety of sensory inputs necessary for clients to participate more fully in therapy.
• Modify therapy tasks and environments for a variety of sensory needs (i.e. sensory seekers, sensory avoiders).
• Apply and integrate sensory strategies to current caseload in order to optimize progress.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

Session 6 - The Role and Function of Speech-Language Pathologists Within a School Multi-Tier System of Supports (MTSS)

Steven Beldin, MA, Independent Consultant

A Multi-Tier System of Supports (MTSS) in schools is a prevention-oriented framework intended to increase the likelihood that all students, including students with disabilities and special needs, will make expected progress toward curriculum standards and indicators. Speech-language pathologists have skills and competencies that can be applied effectively within the context of an MTSS to improve student outcomes. This presentation will provide a description and explanation of a viable MTSS structure and process, including the roles and functions of speech-language pathologists.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the essential components and processes of a viable Multi-Tier System of Supports (MTSS) framework.
• Describe the roles and functions of speech-language pathologists in an MTSS structure and process driven by response to instruction and intervention data.
• Identify and access resources and guidance for effective development and implementation of a viable MTSS,

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

Session 7 - Implementation of Instrumental Evaluations to Determine Swallowing Impairments

Katherine Hoener, MA, CCC-SLP, Choice Rehabilitation; Brooke Beilman, MS, CCC-SLP, Medical SLP Collective, Centerpoint Hospital HCA, Villages of Jackson Creek

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) over-diagnose dysphagia up to 70 pecent of the time at the bedside, while silent aspiration is often missed with the use of clinical swallow evaluations (Ramsey, Smithard & Kalra, 2003; Smiithard et al., 1998; Splaingard, Hutchins, Sulton & Chaudhuri, 1988). As a profession, we miss 14 to 20 percent of silent aspiration at bedside (Leder, 2002). PDPM surfaced in October 2019, further justifying the need to diagnose dysphagia with use of imaging in order to accurately identify impairments. The identification of impairments allows speech-language pathologists to create a treatment plan specific to physiological deficits. This has the potential to reduce unnecessary use of diet modifications, compensatory strategies, therapy sessions and hospital admissions. Subjective screens at bedside will not be enough to justify reimbursement from Medicare due to the inability of clinicians to accurately identify these impairments and/or aspiration without imaging. There is currently no screening protocol proven to provide adequate predictive value for aspiration (O’Horo, Rogus-Pulia, Garcia-Arguello, Robbins & Safdar, 2015). Types of screens in SNF/acute/outpatient include Masa/Mann, Yale Swallow Protocol, Clinical Bedside and SAFE. These protocols can be performed by anyone and therefore are technically screens. As a profession, we need to hold ourselves accountable to higher standards of care and change these statistics. Incorporation of gold standard instrumental evaluations improves credibility within our profession and takes the guesswork out of dysphagia care. Modified barium swallow and fiberoptic endoscopy evaluation are two gold standards of care to further diagnose and guide SLPs in identification of swallowing impairments. This allows appropriate recommendation for compensatory strategies, diet modifications and treatment plans specific for the impairments. The MBSIMP is a standardization for modified barium swallow studies, which assist SLPs in determining the severity of 15 components of a swallow with use of a Likert scale. Incorporation of instrumental evaluations in the dysphagia plan of care will greatly improve SLP clinical decision making, education and strategy incorporation to maximize outcomes for our patients.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define dysphagia screening and types of dysphagia screening tools for clinical bedside examinations.
• Identify Gold Standards in dysphagia evaluation and components of each
• Identify financials and mortality associated with overuse of thickened liquids.

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

Session 8 - Practicing at the Top of the License: Skills for Critically Appraising the Evidence

Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University; Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

This session will examine the diffusion of several controversial practices in CSD and engage participants in discussion on how to identify best practice, have scholarly discussions on controversial practices and develop skills needed to practice at the top of the license. This session will involve skills for critiquing research articles as well as discussing the Roger’s Diffusion of Innovation Theory. In this interactive session, participants will participate in literature evaluation and interpretation. This session is primarily geared towards students and early career professionals; however, all are invited to attend.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Assess the literature to ascertain best practices in assessment and intervention
• Participate in scholarly discussion on controversial topics in communication sciences and disorders
• Discuss the role of Diffusion of Innovation Theory in the spread of controversial practices

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Introductory

8:30 am – 9:30 am

Session 9 - The Power of Yes/No: Promoting Self-Advocacy in Early Language Learners

Kim Gerth, MA, CCC-SLP, Rockwood School District; Raeann Myers, MA, CCC-SLP, Orchard Farm R-V School District

Early language learners, especially those on the autism spectrum, often have difficulty developing independent, functional use of the words yes and no. By initially removing these words from the context of communicating likes and dislikes, however, the Yes/No Protocol teaches the meaning of yes and no through a series of fun and engaging activities. Stories and structured games are each paired with a song that includes both the question and the response. Children progress through the following five stages: experiential, discrimination, synthesis, comparison and preferences. Opportunities for generalization to play activities with peers are included as well. Early learners who develop the ability to independently respond yes/no to questions such as, Do you want…?, may be more successful in advocating for their own wants/needs and preferences. As a result, they may demonstrate less frustration when communicating than children who have not yet learned this skill to independence. Independent yes/no responses also appear to generalize well when the child transitions to another setting or grade level.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the role that an independent, functional yes/no response can play in a child’s overall ability to self-advocate.
• Describe the function of the protest no as a precursor to the use of yes/no in responding to questions.
• Discuss ways in which the various stages of the Yes/No Protocol can broaden the learner’s understanding of the meaning of the words yes and no within the context of daily activities.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

8:45 am – 12:00 pm

AM Short Course - Keep it Practical: Developing Executive Function Skills in Adolescents and Adults

Sarah Ward, MS, CCC-SLP, Cognitive Connections, LLP

Do you have clients who are disorganized, may not have the materials they need or even turn in the work they have completed? Is their desk a black hole for papers and materials? Do you observe clients who struggle to stop and read the room and meet the demands of the situation? Or, clients who struggle to initiate complex academic assignments/tasks, procrastinate and then run out of time to do their best work? Are they constantly multitasking, so tasks/assignment take twice as long as they should? Does it seem they have an inability to breakdown the demands of an assignment and have a sense of how to start? Do you struggle with your own executive function-based challenges? When planning, we envision the future and then sequence, prioritize and organize the steps to achieve a future plan. Essentially, we do what is a called a ‘mental dress rehearsal’ to envision what the task will look like and to pre-experience how we will move through space and time to achieve this future goal. If clients struggle with executive function skills they often rely on a parent or teacher to talk them through the steps of the task and alert them to the time constraints. This is a 10 percent theory and 90 percent practical strategies presentation! Teach adolescents and adults how to independently break down and initiate tasks, see and sense the passage of time, manage long term projects, minimize procrastination and improve self monitoring to stay on task.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• State the functional working definition of what is meant by the term executive function skillsas it pertains to therapeutic interventions
• Develop an intervention program to foster a student’s ability to form more independent executive function skills by describing therapeutic activities to improve task planning, task initiation and transition within and between tasks
• State four interventions that can be used to teach a student to actively self-manage the factors related to the passage of time

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Intermediate

9:15 am – 10:15 am

Session 10 - Voice and Communication Modification in Transgender and Gender Non-Binary People

Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri-Columbia

Speech-language pathologists working with transgender and gender non-binary individuals to modify voice and communication gender perception must take a multi-faceted, culturally-sensitive and individualized intervention approach. This session will explain techniques for modifying and habituating authentic, gender-congruent pitch and pitch range and fostering gender-influenced resonance, articulation, intonation, language and non-verbal communication.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Differentiate between perceptually masculine, feminine and gender-neutral vocal, speech, language and communication behaviors.
• Identify at least three areas other than pitch that should be targeted to promote gender-congruent voice, speech and communication.
• Discuss three functional generalization activities to promote habituation of the modified voice.

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Introductory

10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Session 11 - Autism & Apraxia: Assessment and Treatment From a PROMPT Perspective

PROMPT is an acronym for Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets. PROMPT-trained speech-language pathologists assess and treat individuals holistically by approaching communication as an interaction of the physical-sensory, cognitive-linguistic and social-emotional domains within the Conceptual Framework. This presentation will examine how children with autism and/or apraxia are assessed and treated from a PROMPT perspective.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the product Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets (PROMPT) .

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define autism and apraxia
• Explain key components of PROMPT assessment and treatment
• List ways to implement PROMPT with children who exhibit autism and/or apraxia

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Intermediate

10:15 am – 11:45 am

Session 12 - School Services Update

Kim Stewart, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri and Liberty Public Schools; Pat Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty Public Schools; Beth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District; Diane Cordry Golden, PhD, CCC-A, Association of Assistive Technology Act Programs, MO-CASE retired

This session will provide an overview and update of the proposed speech-language eligibility criterion changes to the Missouri State Plan. This session will provide background on the collaborative work and rationale for changes resulting from the workgroup of SLPs, special education administrators, DESE and other stakeholders.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Summarize the new eligibility criterion changes.
• Identify specific changes that will need to be made in local procedures used for speech-language eligibility determinations.
• Identify resources to assist in eligibility determinations.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

Session 13 - Dyslexia Screening, the Science and the Next Steps

Kim Stuckey, MEd, Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE)

As of 2018, yearly dyslexia screenings for all students grades kindergarten to third grade are mandated. This session will review characteristics of dyslexia, what skills should be screened as most predictive of reading risk, what the latest brain research indicates about reading acquisition and how to use screening data to inform instructional decisions.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Review mandate requirements.
• Identify the language development centers of the brain necessary for skilled reading.
• Determine effective instructional needs for students at risk.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

10:15 am – 12:15 pm

Session 14 - Effective Writing Strategies for Secondary Students With Language Impairment

Mitzi Brammer, PhD, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

By the time students reach middle and high school, they must show what they know via writing. The Missouri Learning Standards indicate that as early as first grade, students are expected to generate written products. However, not all students master the written language competencies even though they are working on them throughout elementary school. Speech-language pathologists often view our work in the area of written expression as ancillary. However, given our knowledge about vocabulary, syntactical and morphological develop as well as pragmatics (yes, pragmatics!). We offer unique skill sets that can assist students in the writing process. This engaging session will address evidence-based practices in written expression from an SLP point of view. While this session is geared toward working with secondary level students, SLPs who work with students in grades four and five can also derive benefit from the information presented.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify various purposes for writing and audiences (genre) and implement appropriate teaching strategies for these.
• Utilize evidence-based strategies for teaching students to write a response to literature showing an understanding of theme and characters.
• Identify and utilize proofing or revision/editing tools/checklists with students to help them self-assess their writing as well as peer-editing.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

Session 15 - Person-Centered Care: Mentoring Skill Development in the Clinic Environment

Karen Muñoz, EdD, Utah State University

Person-centered care (PCC) is considered a hallmark of quality healthcare. When individuals have autonomy in their care through joint decision-making that respects their values and priorities, they have better outcomes. Research shows that when professionals engage in PCC, individuals/families adhere better to healthcare recommendations, they are more satisfied with their health care and they engage in more consistent effective self-management. Providing PCC requires audiologists and speech-language pathologists to use counseling skills intentionally as they communicate with clients and their families; however, many practicing professionals have not had training in PCC limiting the extent PCC is intentionally integrated in clinical encounters. This session will discuss attitudes, knowledge and skills that support PCC communication and describe mentoring strategies that support implementation of PCC communication in practice.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the role person-centered care communication plays in clinical outcomes
• List three strategies to promote person-centered care during clinical encounters
• Describe performance feedback approaches to promote skill development

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

10:30 am – 11:30 am

Session 16 - Interprofessional Education in a University Setting: Sharing Experiences

Anna Campbell, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Molly Cuffe, MA, AT, LAT, University of Central Missouri; Brian Hughes, EdD, ACT, LAT, University of Central Missouri; Swarna Mandali, EdD, RDN, CSSD, LDN, University of Central Missouri; Bonnie Slavych, PhD, CCC-SLP, ACUE, University of Central Missouri; Greg Turner, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Greg Williams, PhD, ATC, CSCS, University of Central Missouri

The accreditation bodies of healthcare provider training programs within the university are encouraging/mandating interprofessional education (IPE) to support interprofessional collaborative practice (IPP). The purpose of this presentation is to provide the audience with a description of IPE practice activities undertaken by dietetics, athletic training and speech-language pathology. The presenters will share successes and challenges toward the development of a model for training core competencies of IPP and encourage discussion with the audience surrounding their experiences in this endeavor.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define the difference between interprofessional education (IPE) and Interprofessional collaborative practice (IPP)
• List the four main core competencies of Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (values and ethics, roles and responsibilities, interprofessional communication, team and teamwork)
• Describe two methods adopted in the training of collaborative practices across the disciplines
• Identify several successes and challenges surrounding the implementation of IPE in a university setting

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Session 17 - Lunch 'N Learn Focus Group Discussion

Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

The purpose of the Lunch ‘N Learn Focus Group Discussion is to explore the perspectives of MSHA members regarding ethics training, clinical education and mentoring. Three groups will be asked to discuss a minimum of 3-4 scenario-based questions on each topic. Each group will consist of at least 10-12 members. The moderator will collect data from each group, seek verbal consent of group members and facilitate inter-group discussions. The content gathered from the groups will be used to write an article for publication in the MSHA Link newsletter.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify solutions to various ethic-based problem scenarios.
• Describe strategies for solving clinical education-based problems.
• Describe strategies for enhancing positive outcomes in mentoring students and entry-level professionals in various clinical settings.

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Intermediate

1:15 pm – 3:45 pm

Session 18 - Student Technical Session I

Click here to view Student Technical Sessions I

Track: Student, Multi-Interest Level: Various

1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

Session 19 - Mentoring Young Professionals: Strategies and Resources

Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University; Pat Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty Public Schools; Beth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District

Focusing on the shared objective of creating successful mentoring programs, the purpose of the workshop-based presentation is to embark discussion on unique aspects of various mentoring programs/models. The attendees (entry-level professionals, graduate students, clinical educators) will discuss various parameters of mentoring programs to ensure a standardized or informal experience to better meet the needs of individual mentees. The discussion will also include strategies to increase commitment of both mentors and mentees to foster the next generation of professionals. The session will also focus on mentoring and supervision strategies related to various work settings, including documentation, licensure, ethical issues and other areas that impact the entry-level professionals and supervisors. During this session, the project titled, MSHA Mentoring Young Professionals Program (MMYP) will be discussed. The program provides mentoring services to graduate students as well as clinical fellows via web-based meetings, webinars and face-to-face roundtable meetings at the Convention. Finally, strategies for mentoring will also be addressed along with current resources.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify practice-based issues in various employment settings.
• Describe specific strategies to achieve their professional and personal goals pertaining to work in various settings.
• Locate and gather information/resources on mentoring as well as useful work setting-based strategies.

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Intermediate

Session 20 - Clinical Swallowing Evaluation for the Medical SLP

Andrea Vaughan, MS, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

This session is designed for those who wish to refine or gain the skills necessary to evaluate swallowing and swallowing disorders in adult and geriatric patients. The important components required to complete a comprehensive clinical swallowing evaluation will be discussed including case history and interview, cranial nerve assessment, cognitive-communication functioning and oral intake. Evaluation components and scoring for the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability will be reviewed for both stroke and head and neck cancer populations. Participants will learn the benefits and limitations of the clinical swallowing evaluation as well as to determine when to pursue an instrumental swallowing evaluation. Instrumental swallowing evaluations (modified barium swallow and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing) will be reviewed and compared, providing the participant with the skills to determine the appropriate evaluation based on the clinical swallow evaluation.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify components of a comprehensive clinical swallowing evaluation.
• Identify the evaluation and scoring components included in the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability for both stroke and head and neck cancer patients.
• Identify and compare the various instrumental swallowing evaluation procedures.

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Session 21 - Hearing Aids: Addressing Barriers to Action to Improve Daily Management

Karen Muñoz, EdD, Utah State University

Challenges with daily hearing aid use and management can be experienced by patients of all ages. Patients’ appropriately strong emotions, fears and personal struggles are factors that may inadvertently interfere with their engagement with audiologists. Providing services within a person-centered care framework provides audiologists with the opportunity to comprehensively understand patient challenges, values and goals—essential for supporting patient ability to overcome challenges and improve daily management. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based approach and is commonly used in health care to support health-related behavior change (Rollnick, Miller & Butler, 2008). MI can be used to help patients and parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing address barriers to intervention including feelings of ambivalence they may be experiencing. MI is a style of communication that can be woven into provider-patient/parent interactions and is based on the conceptualization that people go through stages of change (i.e., precontemplative, contemplative, preparation, action, maintenance) when faced with chronic health concerns. A core feature of MI is tailoring intervention to stage of change. MI is a process and typically occurs over a period of months. This session will describe how audiologists can partner with patients/parents to address barriers to action to improve daily management. Attendees will have opportunities to learn through case-based scenarios.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe reasons audiologists need to identify and address internal barriers to hearing aid uptake and effective daily management
• Describe the benefits of incorporating motivational interviewing skills in audiology services
• Describe skills needed to conduct change-oriented interviews and to motivate action towards effective daily hearing health management

Track: Audiology Level: Intermediate

Session 22 - AAC on the Fly: Simple Strategies to Support Communication

Melanie Schwartz, PhD, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

Patients in medical settings benefit from AAC on the fly to support communication. Strategies using paper, markers and common objects help people with neurological diseases, aphasia, dementia and other conditions. Cases will be presented with hands-on practice and discussion so participants can use these strategies with a range of patients

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Utilize simple strategies to assess and treat clients with severe speech and language deficits
• Provide augmented input to increase comprehension
• Identify appropriate communication strategies for video cases

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

1:30 pm – 4:45 pm

PM Short Course - From Play to Planning: Developing Executive Function Skills in Young Learners Pre-K - Grade 5

Sarah Ward, MS, CCC-SLP, Cognitive Connections, LLP

Executive function skills allow us to manage our attention, our emotions and our behavior in pursuit of our goals. Young children rely on these skills to follow a sequence of instructions for daily tasks while older children need these skills to break a task down into a sequence of steps and organize a timeline as the demands for independent learning increases. When children enter the academic arena, successful task execution requires students to be aware of task demands and set goals. Then, they must access forethought and hindsight to think in an organized way and to sustain their focus on the relevant features of the task. As students mature, they learn how to organize their time, space, materials and develop the reasoning skills to consider solutions to problems. This is a practical strategies seminar! First learn how to clearly define what the executive function skills are for the purpose of determining the most effective treatment interventions. Understand the development of the executive function skills and what is meant by the term executive dysfunction. You will learn dozens of functional, ready-to-use strategies for teaching students how to self-initiate, to transition to the next task and to control their impulses and emotions to successfully self regulate to complete a task. Teach students to sense the passage of time and carry out routines and tasks within allotted time frames. Learn how to use the Get Ready – Do – Done Model to turn the lesson/treatment plans into powerful tools to teach students executive control skills.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the product Cognitive Connections Time Tracker and Get Ready Do Done Materials.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• State the functional working definition of what is meant by the term executive function skillsas it pertains to therapeutic interventions.
• Identify what is the typical developmental course of the executive function skills.
• Describe at least four systematic ways to adapt play skills to teach students self-regulation, forethought, task planning and time management.
• List three interventions to teach a student how to visualize complex tasks and then sequence and plan the requisite steps to complete assigned work.

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Intermediate

2:45 pm – 3:45 pm

Session 23 - Collaborating on Providing Services for Student Athletes With Concussion

Anna Campbell, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Molly Cuffe, MA, AT, LAT, University of Central Missouri; Rebecca David, MS, ATC, LAT, University of Central Missouri; Brian Hughes, EdD, ATC, LAT, University of Central Missouri; Crystal Meeks, MS, ATC, LAT, University of Central Missouri; Greg Turner, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Greg Williams, PhD, ATC, CSCS, University of Central Missouri

The purpose of this presentation is to describe the collaborative model adopted by athletic training and speech-language pathology programs at the University of Central Missouri in providing services to concussed collegiate athlete. The athletic training colleagues will describe their role in return to play and speech-language pathology colleagues will share their focusing on return to learn. The presenters will allow time for participants to share their experience, including those speech-language pathologists working with middle school and high school students.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Analyze the collaborative model adopted between athletic training and speech-language pathology in providing clinical services for concussed student athletes.
• Identify the role of the athletic trainer in supporting the concussed student athlete in returning to play.
• Analyze the role of the speech-language pathologist in supporting the concussed student athlete in returning to learn.

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

Session 24 - FEES Rating Form and Analysis

Andrea Vaughan, MS, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University

This session will discuss the development and application of a fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) rating form based on previously researched objective scales. This form can be utilized to develop consistent interpretation and documentation among multiple clinicians as well as to document change over time. Rating scales include scoring parameters for secretions (Murray et. al, 1996), swallow initiation, pharyngeal residue (Neubauer et. al., 2015) and penetration/aspiration (Rosenbek et. al, 1996) will be discussed. The participant will gain skills to implement this form in their clinical practice. Benefits and limitations of the FEES will be reviewed. Participants will develop skills to determine swallowing impairment based on scales from this form. This session will also include case studies and videos for participants to rate and practice utilizing this form. FEES interpretation and therapeutic strategies will also be discussed.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Utilize research based objective scales to rate parameters of swallowing performance during fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing.
• Assess the benefits and limitations of the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing.
• Analyze fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing videos to discuss swallow function and determine therapeutic strategies.

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

3:15 pm – 4:15 pm

Session 25 - Speech Sound Disorder Treatment Implementation: Intensity and Effective Teaching Methods

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

Much of the research on treatment of speech sound disorders (SSD) focuses on how to select sounds for treatment so that maximum gains are made. However, learning in treatment is critical to the success of any intervention program, which raises practical questions: How much treatment is enough? What does good progress look like? How in the world am I going to teach this child to correctly articulate X (insert any terrifying late acquired sound, especially the dreaded /r/). This session will review the evidence on treatment intensity and treatment progress. In addition, various resources that provide guidance on teaching different complex sounds will be shared. The audience will be welcome to share their tips, too!

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe treatment intensity
• Evaluate the evidence related to treatment intensity for children with SSD
• Identify key resources for effectively teaching complex speech sounds

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

3:45 pm – 5:45 pm

Session 26 - Close The Game Closet: Evidence and Tools for Treatment of Neurogenic Disorders

Sarah Baar, MA, CCC-SLP, Honeycomb Speech Therapy

Person-centered care is emphasized as a best practice in general health care as well as speech-language pathology. However, for a variety of reasons, current therapy practices continue to use games and workbooks as a primary therapy tool without clearly emphasizing a link to functional needs of the patient. How can we choose more meaningful therapy tools and interventions, practicing at the top of our license, using what research tells us about adult rehab? This presentation will describe evidence-based and personalized interventions for the SLP to use in therapy for cognitive-communication treatment for adults, across the continuum of care.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe four evidence-based cognitive interventions that can be integrated with personally-relevant stimuli.
• List four categories that can be used to discover functional needs in various settings.
• Recognize therapy approaches that stem from a medical model approach in comparison to a person-centered care approach.

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Introductory

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Session 27 - Missouri’s Clinical Services Update

Heather Lazarides, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, MHA, BJC Healthcare

The world of healthcare is always changing. During this session, MSHA’s vice predient of clinical services will discuss current and proposed changes, answer questions and listen to MSHA’s membership concerns about clinical services.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe key concepts and theory of Medicare changes as it relates to speech-language pathologist and audiologist
• Describe key concepts and theory of Medicaid changes as it relates to speech-language pathology and audiology
• Identify at risk areas and populations related to speech-language pathology and audiology due to Medicaid and Medicare changes.
• Describe key roles of Missouri’s STAR and StAMP

Track: SLP-Clinical Level: Intermediate

4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

Session 28 - Empowering SLPs: Amplification and AR, New Tools and Updates

Saneta Thurmon, MA, CCC-SLP/A, Saint Louis University; Maureen Fischer, MS, CCC-A, Saint Louis University

The continuing innovation of hearing technology is demanding that SLPs are familiar with a wide variety of new and innovative options for their clients. We will discuss resources for writing AR goals, basic CI and hearing aid information and troubleshooting, as well as new recommendations and regulations related to OTC hearing aids and hybrid cochlear implants. Counseling on device use and troubleshooting, making appropriate referrals and implementing AR strategies during treatment sessions will also be addressed. Armed with the information from this session, SLPs can assure their clients have access to updates in hearing technology and new auditory skills training programs.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify reliable resources for information on basic methods of hearing aid and CI troubleshooting
• Formulate appropriate auditory training goals for children and adults when writing goals for IEPs and insurance reimbursement for adults from case studies presented in the course
• Discuss new regulations and applications of amplification devices such as over-the-counter hearing aids and hybrid implants

Track: Multi-Interest Level: Intermediate

Session 29 - Selecting Treatment Words to Boost Learning of Speech Sounds

Holly Storkel, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas

What do words have to do with it? Traditionally, we have thought of treatment words as just an unimportant vehicle for teaching sounds to preschool and school-age children with speech sound disorders: an inactive ingredient of therapy. Emerging evidence suggests that treatment words matter and can facilitate sound learning. This session will review the characteristics of words that seem to boost speech sound learning: word frequency, neighborhood density and age-of-acquisition of the word. In addition, will consider the role of nonwords in treatment of speech sound disorders. Resources for selecting real words and nonwords will be shared. This presentation will build on the presenter’s open access tutorial on this same topic: https://doi.org/10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0080. Attendees do not need to read the tutorial in advance of attending the presentation.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe real-word characteristics that influence speech sound learning
• Select real words or nonwords to facilitate speech sound learning
• Implement a nonword approach to speech sound treatment

Track: SLP-Educational Level: Introductory

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Session 30 - Poster Presentations - Part I

Click here to view Poster Sessions- Part I

Track: Student, Multi-Interest Level: Various