Friday’s Program

Friday, April 8, 2022

7:00 am – 7:30 am

Session 4 - Small Group Discussions 1

  • Incorporating Gender Inclusive Language – Dr. Samantha Washington
  • Fluency Disorders (fear and avoidance in teens) – Dr. Greg Turner
  • Interprofessional collaboration in the school setting – Shannon Neier
  • Counseling Strategies across the lifespan – Karen Breeding

The purpose of this Small Group Discussion is to explore the perspectives of MSHA members regarding gender inclusive language, fluency disorders in teens, interprofessional collaborations in the school setting and counseling strategies. Four breakout discussion will be available to address each topic.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify ways to incorporate gender inclusive language into your practice.
• List ways fluency disorders invoke dear and avoidance issues in teens.
• Describe the importance of collaborating interprofessionally within the school.

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

8:00 am – 10:00 am

Session 5 - Respiratory Muscle Training (RMT): Clinical Decision Making and Treatment Planning

Kelly Crisp, MA, CCC-SLP, Barnes Jewish West County Hospital

Respiratory muscle training (RMT) is an exercise-based intervention that targets the inspiratory and expiratory muscles and the muscles of the upper airway. RMT can be used to improve inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength and endurance, swallow function, cough strength, airway patency and dyspnea in diverse patient populations. However, the speech-language pathologist (SLP) must individualize the RMT treatment plan to address patient-specific needs and goals. This session will provide a foundation for clinical decision-making and RMT treatment planning based on an in-depth understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system, therapeutic indications and treatment targets. Topics will include identifying appropriate patient populations and individualizing principles of training, including determining RMT dose, identifying therapy goals, selecting outcome measurements, progressing treatment and planning for maintenance. Learners will apply these concepts to inpatient and outpatient clinical scenarios to facilitate independent problem solving and application to real-world contexts.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify three potential therapeutic indications for RMT.
• List three potential RMT treatment targets.
• Modify RMT dose and intensity based on patient performance and treatment targets.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 6 - School Services Update

Angie DeMoss, MS, CCC-SLP, Lee’s Summit R7 School District
Pat Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty Public Schools
Kim Stewart, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri

This session will provide school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) with resources to: utilize ASHA’s workload calculator, review Missouri’s Handbook for school-based SLPs and update SLPs with current roles and topics. The School Services and Early Childhood Committees meet together every other month per Zoom meeting. Join our committee to receive current ASHA information, share successes and discuss concerns.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Use ASHA’s workload calculator efficiently and effectively.
• Locate and utilize Missouri’s Handbook for school-based SLPs
• Gain knowledge regarding the current roles and topics of school based speech-language pathologists.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:45 am – 4:45 pm

Short Course- Building Literacy Skills through Intentional Teaching and Therapy

Laura Justice, PhD, CCC-SLP, The Ohio State University

Children with speech-language disabilities are at heightened risk for reading difficulties. This seminar provides an overview of reading development, examines critical foundational literacy skills and presents evidence-based strategies for promoting literacy skills in young children.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the simple view of reading and its relevance to children with speech-language disabilities
• Identify major milestones in literacy development
• Use three evidence-based approaches in clinical practice to promote literacy development

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:15 am – 11:15 am

Session 7 - The Transition from SLP to Caregiver

Paola Brush, MS, CCC-SLP, Compleat Financial and Private SLP

The purpose of this presentation is to recall personal experiences involving the the use of various SLP skills in relations to my new role as a primary caregiver. Taking a pause from being an actively employed SLP, guided me to a better awareness and appreciation of how this profession helped me to be a better caregiver and advocate for both my now deceased parents. These experiences provided me with insight of what it felt like to be on the other side of the table. Through this presentation, it is my hope to enlighten future and current SLPs on the importance of communication with consumers and caregivers. Advocacy will be touched up0n as it relates to quality of life and end of life care.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List what professional skills were utilized in the role of caregiver
• Identify strategies implemented to improve communication between professionals and family members
• Identify skills used for successful interprofessional interactions with OT, PT, and ST.
• Identify issues which cause burdens on caregivers, recall strategies which incorporate caregiver wellness, and be able to specify the importance of advocacy in regards to overall quality

Level of Learning: Introductory

10:15 am – 12:15 pm

Session 8 - The Language of Autism

The Language of Autism

Elizabeth Obrey, BS, STARS for Autism trainer, disability author, Famil, The Arc of the Ozarks
Angie Perryman, STARS for Autism trainer, Family Advocate, Parent, The Arc of the Ozarks

Students with an autism diagnosis are increasingly finding academic support in their mainstream classrooms, but may face a day of misunderstandings and social barriers. Friendships that form in the classroom and on the playground help build a solid educational foundation and are important in skill development. One of the biggest requests we hear as family advocates and autism trainers are parents asking how their children can make friends? Are there social groups and social skills training to enroll their child in? They don’t have friends, but need and want them. They are lacking the opportunity and the skills.
This presentation looks directly at inclusion within the classroom and the skills needed to be developed by all, not just children with a diagnosis. Students most often follow the lead of the teacher and the tone they set in a classroom as students interact with one another. This presentation teaches educators to recognize the social barriers commonly part of an autism diagnosis, analyze the needs of students struggling with social interaction skills and provide specific tools to teach inclusive language, communication and interaction within their classrooms. It is time to build on acceptance of a diagnosis and teach skills to all students who can in-turn generalize those skills over a lifetime. All while building friendships, relationship aptitude and soft skills for future employment. Every student can have the opportunity to benefit from instruction of inclusion, not just acceptance of a diagnosis.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify when social language is a barrier to classmates engaging with students who have an autism diagnosis.
• Analyze social communication needs of a student with an autism diagnosis.
• Demonstrate social interactions that consider an autism or other developmental diagnosis.
• Give examples of tools that can be used in the classroom to encourage inclusive language and social interactions among peers.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 9 - Making the Most of SLP Therapy Sessions for AAC Users

Kelly Moore, MS, CCC-SLP, Lee’s Summit School District

So your student has an AAC system, now what? Do you struggle to come up with lessons and activities to make the most of therapy time with AAC users? This session will demonstrate ideas for creating engaging lessons for your students while using early language development to guide AAC intervention. This session will also include ideas for how to involve teachers, paraeducators and peers in group sessions to build capacity in promoting AAC use in the classroom.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Explain aided language stimulation and identify examples of modeling versus prompting
• Apply knowledge of typical language development to AAC intervention
• Differentiate core versus fringe vocabulary
• Recall at least three different tools or strategies for promoting AAC use in the classroom

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Session 10 - Dementia in Your World…We Can Do This the Easy Way or the Hard Way!

Toni Fisk, CMDCP, CDP, CDM CFPP, DinnerWEARhc, Inc

One of every five households today is afflicted by some form of dementia. Is that your family? A staff member? A patient or their family member? Dementia can be scary. How is your inner circle trained to deal with dementia and the potential “episodes” that may arise-personally and professionally? Gain Dementia 101 knowledge and grasp what it is that WE often do that is the creator of the situations, the confusion and ultimately the depression and despair. Those frustrations apply to both the person living with dementia and that care partner interacting with them. There is HOPE…The presenter will then show you how to master the positive actions that YOU can take to reduce, prevent and redirect those negative feelings and behaviors. By changing ourselves, we can help others along the way.

Ponder this…when the person living with dementia can’t verbally communicate or hear and comprehend what you are saying, how do you get them to eat and drink? What advice do you recommend to your patients? Poor nutrition leads to further decline. The presenter’s specialty is nutrition and dining; she will finish today’s session by providing tips on addressing these types of “unmet” needs. It is up to us, as these family members and friends manage the disease of dementia and brain change, to provide nutritional sustenance by consuming “real” food and beverages versus supplements. Be a part of the solution to remove the stigma of dementia and embrace these folks and their abilities for as long as we can.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Summarize Dementia 101 facts – What’s going on up there?
• Show and Tell – How to instantly recognize and correct OUR negative physical actions.
• List unique strategies to encourage proper nutrition for persons living with dementia.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

1:15 pm – 2:15 pm

Session 11 - Framework for Creating Successful Intervention for Preschool Aged Children

Rebecca Frisella, MS, CCC-SLP, St. Louis University
Christina Loveless, MS, CCC-SLP, St. Louis University

Many challenges are presented to the school-based and home-based SLP working with early intervention and preschool aged clients. Methods for increasing efficiency of therapy planning and achieving effective treatment outcomes will be discussed. Carryover strategies to support caregivers and teachers working with developmental skills will be reviewed. This session will present a successful framework for addressing many areas of development withing individual and group therapy sessions. Specific activities, strategies, checklists and charts will be used to improve the process of planning effective therapy sessions.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identifying treatment methods and techniques that will increase developmentally appropriate speech and language skills for individual and group sessions.
• Determine effective carryover strategies to support professionals and caregivers.
• Select three activities that will combine the use of the following developmental skills: play skills, fine/gross motor skills and language/literacy skills into a therapy session..

Level of Learning: Intermediate

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Session 13 - What to do When Phonics Fail: Tier 2 Reading Interventions

Laura Frye, MS, CCC-SLP, MA, SpEd, Private Practice

The National Reading Panel Report (NRPR; 2000) is a comprehensive publication that identifies and substantiates how critical phonemic discrimination is for literacy acquisition. In the past two decades, phonics curriculum has exploded in popularity, improving the overall quality of reading curriculum and practices across the US. Despite best practices, however, a significant number of students continue to struggle with phonics. These students may be identified for Tier 2 services which often includes more time and practice with traditional phonics, resulting in little or very slow progress. SLPs are qualified to identify missing phonological awareness (PA) skills that coincide with poor memory, maintenance, and carryover. At the same time, they would benefit from more information and evidence based strategies to identify and remediate missing PA skills that are the building blocks for phonemic discrimination. Effective practices must include ample opportunities combined with learning practices that reinforce development of phonological memory, repair of missing phonological awareness skills, improve delayed recall and carryover to orthography, vocabulary and grammar. Ideally, SLPs could facilitate and cooperate with educators and families if given access to cohesive, evidence-based phonics curriculum that remediate earlier developing PA skills. This session will describe procedures to identify persistent deficits in phonological and orthographic awareness and easy strategies (using existing SLP supplies) to address deficits at the syllable level will be presented. Onset rime with word families curriculum will be introduce, described in depth with relevant research.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify discrete skills along the phonological awareness continuum, distinguishing the developmental differences between onset rime and phonemic discrimination. .
• Identify components of word recognition and connections between and within components.
• Identify the phases of learning, from dual coding, attention, ST and working memory, consolidation and long term memory.
• Describe how onset rime instruction overlaps word family instruction and builds connections between phonological awareness and orthographic awareness

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 14 - Missouri's Clinical Services Update 2022

Michelle Vomund, MEd, CCC-SLP, Maryville University
Laura Randen, MA, CCC-SLP, Elite Therapy Wellness

Join MSHA’s VP of Clinical Services for the 2022 update. Attendees will have the opportunity to examine state legislative and regulatory issues impacting audiologists and speech-language pathologists in 2022. Attendees will also explore telepractice changes as a result of the public health emergency along with examining reimbursement issues impacting our members at large.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Examine the federal/state nature of Medicaid related to audiology and speech-language pathology.
• Identify related oversight mechanisms for Medicaid related to our fields.
• Identify the legal and regulatory policies that influence the reimbursement of services provided by speech-language pathologists and audiologists.
• Identify changes to telepractice regulation as the declared public health emergency ends in many states.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Session 15 - Social Communication Assessment Strategies and Materials for Students With Behavioral Challenges - WITHDRAWN

Robin Murphy, MS, CCC-SLP; Morgan Kaess, BS; Erin Losin, BS, Saint Louis University

Session 16 - Supporting Families and Teachers Through Culturally Diverse Service Delivery

Michelle Vomund, MEd, CCC-SLP, Maryville University
Laura Randen, MA, CCC-SLP, Elite Therapy Wellness

Join MSHA’s VP of Clinical Services for the 2022 update. Attendees will have the opportunity to examine state legislative and regulatory issues impacting audiologists and speech-language pathologists in 2022. Attendees will also explore telepractice changes as a result of the public health emergency along with examining reimbursement issues impacting our members at large.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Examine the federal/state nature of Medicaid related to audiology and speech-language pathology.
• Identify related oversight mechanisms for Medicaid related to our fields.
• Identify the legal and regulatory policies that influence the reimbursement of services provided by speech-language pathologists and audiologists.
• Identify changes to telepractice regulation as the declared public health emergency ends in many states.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

3:45 pm – 4:45 pm

Session 17 - Theory of Mind: Perspective for Assessment and Intervention

Laura Crites, MA, CCC-SLP, MA-Education-Reading, Special School District of St Louis County

Perspective taking, context, mental states and comprehension are central components of theory of mind. From early development, nonverbal skills relay information about a person’s ability to initiate and reciprocate in communicative exchange. These skills become refined as they mature into communicating and comprehending subtleties of language e.g. sarcasm, anger and empathy. When development is delayed or halted, complex language deficits can be a measure that suggest autism, emotional disturbance, intellectual deficits and language impairment. Researchers debate the value of theory of mind measures in the process of assessment. This presentation considers the arguments for and against using theory of mind tasks for assessment. It further discusses their use and value in programming.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify developmental age ranges associated with theory of mind skills.
• Identify tests and tasks used to assess theory of mind.
• Distinguish the diagnostic value of theory of mind tests and tasks.
• Identify how theory of mind skills can be targeted in therapy.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

3:45 pm – 5:45 pm

Session 18 - Best Practices in Aphasia Management: A Quick Guide

Jacqueline J. Hinckley, PhD, CCC-SLP, Nova Southeastern University

Person-centered care is more than just asking our clients if they understand or agree with the goals we’ve established for them. In this session, we’ll start by discussing the 10 International Best Practices for Aphasia. Those best practices will be reflected in case-based discussions of how to gather the priorities of clients who have aphasia, including specific tools. We’ll describe a framework for matching assessments to those priorities, and how you can collaborate with clients to create goals and assess progress in an evidence-based way. We’ll finish by talking about intervention techniques that cut across type and severity of aphasia

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define person-centered care.
• List three elements of a functional, person-centered goal statement for aphasia
• Describe one example of a functional assessment for aphasia
• Discuss at least two evidence-based interventions that work for all types and severities of aphasia

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 19 - Supervising Today's Students

Kim Ireland, MS, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University
Lauren Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Missouri State University

Overwhelmingly, students in both SLP and audiology graduate programs are part of a new generation: Generation Z. These students possess characteristics that might impact response to supervision in a supervisor/supervisee relationship. This session will provide types of feedback all learners need to grow and develop skills. Additionally, obstacles to receiving/providing feedback and how to address them will be discussed within the supervisor/supervisee relationship.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Label and identify characteristics of own generation.
• Identify characteristics of Generation Z and how these might impact response to supervision.
• Identify three kinds of feedback student learners need.
• Describe some obstacles to receiving feedback within the supervisory relationship and how to address them.

Time Ordered Agenda:
5 Minutes – Welcome, Initial Instructions and Speaker Disclosures
55 Minutes – Generations in the Workplace/Meet iGen
50 Minutes – The Art and Science Behind Providing Great Feedback for Student Learners
10 Minutes – Q & A

Level of Learning: Intermediate

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Session 20 - Poster Presentations - Part I